Program Focus

Dedicated to preparing leading healthcare management professionals

The Master of Health Administration is a dynamic program with a rigorous curriculum, expert faculty and an emphasis on values-based, competency-driven and experiential learning.

 

Values-Based Education

As part of a faith-based institution, the MHA program provides a values-based education that develops exceptional healthcare leaders. Students work to grow into effective collaborators motivated by their commitment to the healthcare profession and a genuine compassion for others.

Mission

The mission of the Master of Health Administration program is to educate and develop early career healthcare leaders who are able to positively impact the wellness of the communities they serve.

The program focuses on preparing individuals to serve in public, private and federal healthcare settings including hospitals, integrated delivery systems, medical groups and insurance providers.

Delivered in an evening, cohort-based format, the program offers the opportunity for both working and non-working students to complete their degree in less than two years.

Vision

To be the preeminent education program in health administration for developing leaders capable of transformative response to a continuously evolving healthcare environment, positively shaping and impacting the health of the communities they serve.

Values

The program draws upon the rich history of the University of the Incarnate Word. This relationship guides program direction and provides the value foundation on which the Master of Health Administration program was developed. The defining program values are drawn from the institution but manifest themselves in all aspects of the program.

  • Integrity: The program seeks to develop students with strong moral character and an unwavering commitment to honesty in all actions.
  • Excellence: Program excellence is measured by our student’s ability to make a significant and lasting contribution to the profession of healthcare management.
  • Faith: The program is committed to educational excellence in a context of faith in Jesus Christ, the Incarnate Word of God.
  • Service: The program curriculum includes a global perspective and an emphasis on social justice and community service.
  • Innovation: The program is open to thoughtful innovation that serves ever more effectively the spiritual and material requirements of those in need.
  • Truth: The faculty and students support one another in the search for and the communication of truth.
  • Education: The program aims to educate men and women who will become concerned and enlightened citizens who seek to make a difference in the healthcare management profession.
 

Competency-Driven Curriculum

Using a curriculum built upon a nationally recognized and locally approved competency model, the MHA program strives to produce complex thinkers who are able to conceptualize, critically analyze and compellingly communicate a course of action that is in the best interests of those they serve.

The following 23 core curriculum domains and competencies serve as the foundation of the UIW Master of Health Administration program.

Domain 1: Knowledge of the Healthcare Environment

  • Healthcare Environment: Ability to explain issues and advancements in the healthcare industry.
  • Policy and Advocacy: Ability to effectively participate in discussions relating to health policy at the local, state and federal levels.

Domain 2: Critical Thinking and Analysis

  • Critical Thinking and Analysis: The ability to assess the authenticity, accuracy and worth of knowledge claims, beliefs, or arguments and reaching sound conclusions based on observation and information.
  • Innovative Thinking: Ability to apply complex concepts, develop creative solutions, or adapt previous solutions in new ways.
  • Process Management and Organizational Design: Ability to analyze and design, or improve, an organizational process, including incorporating the principles of patient safety, quality and continuous improvement.
  • Strategic Orientation: Ability to consider the business, demographic, ethno-cultural, political, and regulatory implications of decisions and develop strategies that continually improve the long-term success and viability of the organization.

Domain 3: Business and Management Knowledge

  • Accountability: Ability to hold people accountable to standards of performance with the long-term good of the organization in mind.
  • Project Management: Ability to plan and execute a project involving significant resources, scope, and impact.
  • Financial Skills: Ability to understand and explain financial and accounting information, prepare and manage budgets, and make sound long-term investment decisions.
  • Human Resources Management: Ability to implement staff development and other management practices that represent contemporary best practices, comply with legal and regulatory requirements, optimize the performance of the work force, including performance assessments, alternative compensation and benefit methods, and the alignment of human resource practices and processes to meet the strategic goals of the organization.
  • Information Technology Management: Ability to see the potential in and understand the use of administrative and clinical technology and decision-support tools in process and performance improvement.
  • Legal and Regulatory Application and Assessment: Ability to understand and explain the regulatory and administrative environment in which the organization functions (e.g., CMS; JCI; NCQA; antitrust; Stark I and II). Includes the ability to understand and explain corporate compliance laws and regulations (e.g., physician recruitment, billing and coding practices, antitrust, conflict of interest, etc.).
  • Performance Measurement: Ability to understand and use statistical, economic, epidemiological, and financial methods and metrics to set goals and measure clinical as well as organizational performance; commitment to and employment of evidence-based techniques.

Domain 4: Political and Community Development

  • Community Orientation: Ability to align one’s own and the organization’s priorities and assess and address community wellness needs in an evidence-based and holistic manner, i.e., one that addresses the physical, mental, social and spiritual needs of the community, with the goal of providing the best care, at the lowest price for all.
  • Professionalism and Ethics: The demonstration of ethics and sound professional practices, as well as stimulating social accountability and community stewardship. The desire to act in a way that is consistent with one’s values and what one says is important.

Domain 5: Communication

  • Communication Skills: Ability to speak and write in a clear, logical, and grammatical manner in formal and informal situations and to prepare cogent business presentations.
  • Interpersonal Understanding: Ability to understand other people as well as to accurately hear and understand the unspoken or partly expressed thoughts, feelings, and concerns of others. It measures increasing complexity and depth of understanding of others and includes cross-cultural sensitivity.

Domain 6: Leadership

  • Collaboration: The ability to work cooperatively with others as part of a team or group, including demonstrating positive attitudes about the team, its members, and its ability to get its mission accomplished, and the ability to effectively resolve conflict.
  • Impact and influence: Ability to persuade and convince others (individuals or groups) to support a point of view, position, or recommendation.
  • Team Leadership: Ability to see oneself as a leader of others, from forming a top team that possesses balanced capabilities to setting the mission, values, and norms, as well as holding the team members accountable individually and as a group for results.
  • Self-Confidence: A belief in one's own capability to accomplish a task and select an effective approach to a task or problem. This includes confidence in one's ability as expressed in increasingly challenging circumstances and confidence in one's decisions or opinions.
  • Achievement: A concern for surpassing a standard of excellence. The standard may be one's own past performance (striving for improvement); an objective measure (results orientation); outperforming others (competitiveness); challenging goals, or something that has not been done previously (innovation).
  • Initiative: Ability to identify a problem, obstacle, or opportunity and taking action in light of this identification to address current or future problems or opportunities. Initiatives should be seen in the context of proactively doing things and not simply thinking about future actions. The time frame of this scale moves from addressing current situations to acting on future opportunities or problems.
 

Experientially Focused Learning

Program curriculum is delivered by faculty with extensive healthcare management experience who seek to provide students multiple opportunities to develop and apply program competencies in professional settings. The curriculum is designed to provide all MHA students with health management experience by graduation.

Via four curriculum components – graduate assistantships, professional development, seminar series and capstone projects – the MHA program focuses on developing the competencies associated with professionalism, teamwork and leadership, all critical for career advancement. Dr. Kevin LaFrance shares how experiential learning factors into the program's teaching methods.

Graduate Assistantship

The MHA program has established a Graduate Assistantship (GA) experience focused on providing students an opportunity to work 15-20 hours a week in a healthcare organization concurrent with their didactic program. The GA experience is designed for students lacking relevant healthcare experience. Those participating in the GA program are paired with one of our industry partners representing many different areas of the healthcare industry including hospitals, health clinics, physician groups and community health centers.

Students begin the GA program in the fall semester of their second year and have an opportunity to gain experience over two full semesters. The GA program focuses on project-oriented activities that demonstrate the student’s ability to contribute to organizational outcomes. The GA program is required for those students without relevant healthcare experience and the ability to participate will be considered in the decision to accept a student into the program.

Professional and Leadership Development

All students participate in a series of curriculum-based activities that focus on professional and leadership development. Healthcare executive-led activities related to resume writing and interview skills help to develop the student’s professional core. Leadership skills are developed and enhanced through peer and faculty assessment and feedback of team-based leadership opportunities. Additionally, students have the opportunity to participate in interprofessional experiences that enhance their understanding of professional and leadership dynamics within the contemporary healthcare environment.

Seminar Series

Students are required to attend several program- directed seminar sessions in each year of their degree program. These sessions expose the students to current issues in healthcare and allow them to interact with practicing healthcare administrators and other professionals and to observe the application of management principals outside the traditional classroom setting.

Capstone Experience

The culminating academic event of the program is a client-based capstone project. Working in teams, and for a health industry client, students address a significant management problem, question or issue in real-time. Capstone project work is evaluated by both the professor and the client.

 

Mission-Focused Faculty

The faculty of the Master of Health Administration program are dedicated to the success of their students and serve as industry mentors after graduation. MHA faculty members foster a collaborative classroom environment where students and professors work together toward the goal of providing excellent health care to our communities. Learn more about our faculty.

Hear from MHA Director Dr. Chris Nesser about the value of the MHA program at the University of the Incarnate Word.

 

MHA Advisory Board

Because the MHA program strives to stay at the forefront of the rapidly evolving healthcare industry, it invites industry leaders to provide their insight and expertise to help inform the program’s offerings and approaches. The Executive Advisory Board advises and assists the Master of Health Administration program in accomplishing the following goals:

  • Being responsive to the social and educational needs of the community
  • Staying abreast of societal and business climate changes and adjusting program priorities to meet changing needs
  • Providing knowledge transfer to the healthcare industry
  • Providing services consistent with students’ need
  • Being responsive to a diverse clientele

Don Beeler

  • UIW MHA Program Mentor
  • Former Chief Executive Officer
  • Christus Santa Rosa Health System – San Antonio

Jeffery A. Cowart

  • President
  • SVP Strategies, LLC – San Antonio and Washington D.C.

Geoffrey W. Crabtree

  • Senior Vice President
  • Methodist Healthcare System – San Antonio

Mary E. Garr, COL (Ret)

  • Chief Executive Officer
  • Family Service Association – San Antonio

Robert Lenza

  • Previous Chief Executive Officer
  • Methodist Children’s Hospital – San Antonio

Paul Nguyen

  • President and Chief Executive Officer
  • CommuniCare Health Centers – San Antonio

Ike W. Pauli Jr. M.D.

  • Administrative Partner
  • Northeast Pediatrics Association, PA – San Antonio

Eric R. Schmacker, FACHE

  • President
  • Mission Trail Baptist Hospital – San Antonio

Huda G. Terraz, MHA

  • Supervisory Health System Specialist, Medical Care Line
  • Michael E. DeBakey VA Medical Center – Houston