Course Descriptions

Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science in Biology

For a full list of all courses offered by the Department of Biology, visit the course catalogue.

This course studies the cellular and molecular biology of living organisms. Cell structure and function, metabolism and genetics are emphasized. It serves as a foundation for advanced courses in biology and is for science majors. Fee.

Corequisite: MATH 1304 or higher content level.

Prerequisite: MATH 1304 or MATH 1311 or MATH 2312 or MATH 2313 or MATH 2314 or MATH 2322

Mathematics course descriptions

This course examines the diversity of living organisms, structure and function of plants and animals, principles of evolution, and ecology for science majors. It is a foundation for advanced courses in biology. Students must enroll in both the lecture and a laboratory section. Fee. 

Corequisite: BIOL 1403

Prerequisite: MATH 1304 or MATH 1311 or MATH 2312 or MATH 2313 or MATH 2322 or MATH 2314

Mathematics course descriptions

This lab course supports the corresponding lecture Anatomy and Physiology I and provides students with an opportunity to increase their understanding of human anatomy and physiology by observing and dissecting fresh and preserved materials, performing investigations of physiological processes, building models to aid in understanding the relation of structure to function, performing simple test to measure physiological processes. Fee.

This lab course supports the corresponding lecture Anatomy and Physiology II and provides students with an opportunity to increase their understanding of human anatomy and physiology by observing and dissecting fresh and preserved materials, performing investigations of physiological processes, building models to aid in understanding the relation of structure to function, performing simple test to measure physiological processes. Fee.

This is a course covering the first half of a two semester sequence on the structure and function of the human organism. The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with the levels of organization; the relationship of structure to function; cell structure, growth, and metabolism; cell transport mechanisms; protection and temperature regulation; support and movement; and the integration and control functions of the human body.

This Anatomy and Physiology II is a course covering the second half of a two-semester sequence on the structure and function of the human organism. The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with the endocrine system, circulation, immunity, respiration, digestion, urinary system, homeostasis of acid, base, and fluids, reproduction, and development.

Prerequisite: BIOL 2321

This course is intended to give the student an advanced understanding of structure and function at the cellular and molecular level. This 3-hour lecture course includes discussion and interpretation of the dynamic processes of cells, including protein trafficking, signaling, and proliferation. Readings will discuss classical concepts of cell biology along with recent discoveries and ideas derived using biochemical, molecular, cellular, and genetic experimental approaches. Emphasis will be on eukaryotic and prokaryotic model systems.

Prerequisite: BIOL 3311 or BIOL 3411 or BIOL 3361 or BIOL 3461

This course is intended to give the student an advanced understanding of structure and function at the cellular and molecular level. This 3-hour lecture course includes discussion and interpretation of the dynamic processes of cells, including protein trafficking, signaling, and proliferation. Readings will discuss classical concepts of cell biology along with recent discoveries and ideas derived using biochemical, molecular, cellular, and genetic experimental approaches. Emphasis will be on eukaryotic and prokaryotic model systems. BIOL 3411 and BIOL 3311 cannot both be counted for credit.

Prerequisites: BIOL 1402 and BIOL 1403 and CHEM 1301 and CHEM 1302 and CHEM 1203L or CHEM 1101 and CHEM 1102

Chemistry course descriptions

This course studies the functional anatomy and physiological processes in animals by comparing different animal groups, evolutionary history of animals' phyla, structural adaptations of animals, and the relationship of these modifications to different habitat and environmental conditions. Fee.

Prerequisites: BIOL 1402 and CHEM 1302

Chemistry course descriptions

This course studies the biological and physical environments, and the dynamic relationships of population and communities. Fee.

Prerequisites: BIOL 1402BIOL 1403 and CHEM 1302

Chemistry course descriptions

This course will provide the student an advanced understanding of the principles of Mendelian genetics, the molecular biology of genetics, and key concepts in population genetics and genomics. This course studies the principles of heredity and how they apply to the inheritance of biological traits. This course will examine classic patterns of inheritance and extensions to these patterns. This course will also study the molecular mechanisms involved in DNA replication, repair, transcription, translation, and gene regulation. Current concepts in population genetics and genomics will also be examined. BIO 3461 and BIO 3361 cannot both be counted for credit.

Prerequisites: BIOL 1402 and BIOL 1403 and CHEM 1302 and CHEM 1203L or CHEM 1101 and CHEM 1102

Chemistry course descriptions

This course offers an introduction to neuroscience. The course includes neuronal structure and physiology, neurotransmitter systems, sensory and motor systems, and behavior. Motivation, hormone action, and emotions are also covered.

Prerequisites: BIOL 1402 and BIOL 2121 and BIOL 3430 or BIOL 2321

This course studies the evolutionary history and patterns of distribution of vertebrates and their structural and behavioral adaptations. Fee.

Prerequisites: BIOL 1402 and CHEM 1302 or permission of the instructor.

Chemistry course descriptions

This course in an upper division course for biology (or related) majors that covers the evolution of animal behavior. Topics covered include the development of behaviors, control and organization of behavior, and the evolution of behaviors related to survival, feeding, communication, reproduction, parental care and sociality across a wide variety of animal taxa. Laboratory exercises will reinforce concepts presented in the lecture. Fee.

Prerequisite: BIOL 1401 or BIOL 1403

This broad survey of sub disciplines within entomology covers beneficial and harmful aspects of insects, including production of silk and honey, agricultural pests, household and structural pests, and those insects that are of medical and veterinary importance because they transmit disease. The toxicology of insecticides and pest management by biological control will be studied. Fee.

Prerequisites: BIOL 1402 and CHEM 1302 or permission of the instructor.

Chemistry course descriptions