School of Mathematics, Science and Engineering

Mathematics, Science and Engineering Programs Offered

BIOLOGY (BIOL)

The common core of Biology courses and support work will serve all career paths. All Biology graduates will participate in a capstone research experience that will allow the students to apply their learning to real-world problems. Requirements for the three proposed degree options will provide students with preparation necessary for their chosen career path. These degree options are:

  1. Option 1 - B.S. in Biology: Preparation for Health Professions, Research, and Graduate Programs in Biology;
  2. Option 2 - B.S. in Biology with Education Minor: Preparation for certification in secondary Life Science teaching
  3. Option 3 - B.S. in Biology with Environmental Science Minor: Preparation for careers in resource management and environmental stewardship

All students in Biology will complete core requirements in Biology and support course work in Chemistry.

Major Requirements for a Bachelor of Science:

1. 24 Semester Hours of Biology as follows:

BIOL

1401

Diversity of Life and Lab

BIOL

1402

Unity of Life and Lab

BIOL

3411

Cell Biology and Lab

BIOL

3442

Ecology and Lab

BIOL

3461

Genetics and Lab

At least 4 hours selected from the following research/lab options

BIOL

3410

Soil Conservation and Lab

BIOL

4151

Biochemistry I Lab

BIOL

4350

Biochemistry I

BIOL

4460

Research in Water Quality

BIOL

43XX or 44XX

Research in Biology

2. Completion of course work specified in one of the following degree options:

Option 1 - Health Professions and Research

Option 2 - Secondary Teaching with a minor in Education

Option 3 - Environmental Science with a minor in Environmental Science

3. 8 semester hours support course work in chemistry:

CHEM

1301/1101

Chemistry Principles I and Lab

CHEM

1302/1101

Chemistry Principles II and Lab

4. 3 semester hours of support course work in Mathematics:

MATH

2312

Calculus I or

MATH

2303

Introduction to Probability and Statistics

Degree Option in Biology 1 - Preparation for Health Professions, Research, and Graduate Programs in Biology

Students choosing this option need to pay special attention to the 42 upper-division credit hour requirements for graduation. Because the required Biology and Core Curriculum contain only 31 to 35 required upper-division credits, students should take 7 to 11 upper-division credit hours of core electives to complete the graduation requirement of 42 upper-division credit hours.

1. 16-20 semester hours of required Biology course work

A. BIOL 2321/2121 (Anatomy and Physiology I with Lab) and either BIOL 2322/2122 (Anatomy and Physiology II with Lab) or BIOL 3430 (Structure and Function of Animals)

B. 12 Credit Hours of Biology Electives for a total of 40-44 credit hours in Biology

2. 8 semester hours support work in Chemistry

CHEM

2311/2111

Organic Chemistry I and Lab

CHEM

2312/2112

Organic Chemistry II and Lab

3. 8 semester hours support work in Physics

PHYS

1301/1101 and 1302/1102

General Physics I and II and Labs or

PHYS

2305/2105 and 2306/2106

Physics I and II and Lab

Degree Option in Biology 2 - Secondary Teacher Certification in Life Science with a Minor in Education

1. 14-16 semester hours of required Biology course work

A. BIOL 2321/2121 (Anatomy and Physiology I with Lab)

B. BIOL 2322/2122 (Anatomy and Physiology II with Lab) or BIOL 3430 (Structure and Function of Animals)

C. 6-8 semester hours of Biology electives for a total of 38-40 credit hours in Biology

2. Required Support Course Work in Physical Science: 8 additional semester hours of Chemistry, Physics, or Geology

3. Required 27 credit-hour Minor in Education (includes teacher apprenticeship)

Degree Option in Biology 3 - Environmental Science

1. Required Course Work in Biology: 14-16 additional semester hours in Biology (BIOL 4482 Aquatic Biology and BIOL 4490 Texas Flora recommended)

2. Required support course work in Physical Science: 8 additional semester hours of Chemistry, Physics, or Geology

3. Required 19 credit-hour Minor in Environmental Science

Requirements for a Minor in Environmental Science for Biology Majors:

Biology majors must complete 19 hours in the following Environmental Science courses: ENSC 1410, 2410, 3410, 4305, and 4415. Optional courses that can substitute for one of the upper-level courses (except Environmental Science Internship): ENSC 4460, 4499. Biology majors may select the Minor in Environmental Science for Chemistry Majors but must satisfy all Chemistry course prerequisites. Contact Department Chair in Biology or Environmental Science for further information on this minor.

Requirements for a Minor in Biology:

18 semester hours, 9 of which must be taken at the upper-division level and selected from at least two of the following areas: cell biology, genetics, and ecology.

CHEMISTRY (CHEM)

Chemistry is the science that deals with the properties, composition and structure of matter; with the changes that occur in matter; and with energy relationships involved in these changes. The Chemistry program at the University is designed to give the undergraduate student a sound background in chemistry as a whole, thereby providing preparation for work or further study in any of the large number of specialized areas that may be entered after graduation. Some students enter medical and dental programs after graduation. Faculty are involved in four areas of chemical education and research: analytical, organic, physical, and biochemistry.

Major Requirements for a Bachelor of Science:

1. 46 semester hours distributed as follows:

A. Non-Chemistry courses:

MATH

2312/2313

Calculus I and II

PHYS

2305/2105

Physics I and Lab

PHYS

2306/2106

Physics II and Lab

B. Required Chemistry courses:

CHEM

1301/1101

Chemistry Principles I and Lab

CHEM

1302/1102

Chemistry Principles II and Lab

CHEM

2311/2111

Organic Chemistry I and Lab

CHEM

2312/2112

Organic Chemistry II and Lab

CHEM

3421

Quantitative Analysis and Lab

CHEM

4431

Physical Chemistry I and Laboratory

C. 7 hours of Chemistry electives selected from:

CHEM

3441

Inorganic Chemistry

CHEM

4422

Instrumental Analysis and Lab

CHEM

4432

Physical Chemistry II and Lab

CHEM

4351/4152

Biochemistry I and Lab

CHEM

4352

Biochemistry II

D. 2 hours selected from:

CHEM

4101

Seminar

CHEM

2160/2260

Chemical Research

CHEM

4160/4260

Advanced Chemical Research

2. A minor in any field.

Recommendations: Freshman-Sophomore Preparation

Students contemplating a major in Chemistry should take CHEM 1301/1101 and CHEM 1302/1102 in the fall and spring semesters respectively of the freshman year. CHEM 2311/2111 and CHEM 2312/2112 should be taken in the fall and spring semesters respectively of the sophomore year. MATH 2312 and 2313 should be completed by the end of the sophomore year.

Additional course work is encouraged in biochemistry, physics, mathematics, business, and/or computer programming depending on the educational and career goals of the student.

Requirements for a Minor in Chemistry:

18 semester hours, 10 of which must be taken at the upper-division level.

Explanation of laboratories: some laboratory courses are considered as separate courses and separate grades are given for the laboratories and corresponding lectures. Enrollment in a laboratory course requires concurrent enrollment in the corresponding lecture course, or permission of the instructor.

Requirements for a Minor in Environmental Science for Chemistry Majors:

Chemistry majors must complete 18 hours in the following Environmental Science courses:

ENSC

1410

Environmental Sciences and Laboratory

ENSC

2315

Environmental Chemistry

ENSC

4203

Environmental Chemistry Laboratory

ENSC

4301

Aquatic Environmental Chemistry

ENSC

4302

Atmosphere Environment Chemistry

ENSC

4305

Environmental Science Internship

Chemistry majors may select the Minor in Environmental Science for Biology Majors but must satisfy all Biology course prerequisites. Contact the Department Chair in Chemistry or Environmental Science for further information on this minor.

APPLIED CHEMISTRY

Applied Chemistry is the hands-on study of molecules, structure and reactivity. Students in the Associate of Arts in Applied Chemistry will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the basic concepts of chemistry and the ability to apply those concepts in real-world situations. Graduates will be prepared for careers as chemical technicians in today's advanced job market.

Major requirements for an Associate of Arts:

1. 37 semester hours distributed as follows:

ENGL

1311

English Composition I

ENGL

1312

English Composition II

Literature course

Fine Arts course

PHIL

1381

Introduction to Philosophy

Religious Studies or Philosophy course

COMP

1301

Computer Literacy (course or test)

History course

Social Science course

CHEM

1301/1101

Chemical Principles I and Lab

MATH

1304

College Algebra

DWHP

1200

Dimensions of Wellness

Physical Education course

2. Required Chemistry Courses (24 hours):

CHEM

1302/1102

Chemical Principles II and Lab

CHEM

2311/2111

Organic Chemistry I and Lab

CHEM

2312/2112

Organic Chemistry II and Lab

CHEM

2420

Introduction to Analytical Chemistry and Lab

CHEM

2430

Applied Chemical Research I

CHEM

2431

Applied Chemical Research II

3. Non-chemistry Courses (6 hours)

MATH

2303

Introduction to Probability and Statistics

SPCH

1311

Public Speaking

ENGINEERING (ENGR)

The University offers a Bachelor of Science degree in Engineering Management. This curriculum combines a strong core of Mathematics, Science, and Engineering courses with an intensive study in Business Administration. Modern engineering requires an understanding of social issues and economics as well as a thorough knowledge of science and technology. A student who graduates with a BS degree with a major in Engineering Management will bring a unique blend of technology and real world business skills to any future career. Graduates will be prepared to begin a career as a manager in nearly any engineering firm nationwide.

Major Requirements for a Bachelor of Science in Engineering Management

1. Engineering and Engineering support courses (36 hours):

ENGR

1201

Introduction to Engineering

ENGR

1310

Engineering Graphics (CAD I)

ENGR

1312

Engineering Design (CAD II)

ENGR

3350

Statics and Dynamics

ENGR

3455

Strength of Materials and Lab

ENGR

3460

Electronic Circuits and Lab

ENGR

4375

Thermodynamics

ENGR

4470

Fluid Mechanics and Lab

ENGR

4490

Senior Project

ENGR

4399

Special Topics in Engineering

CIS course 3000 level or above, approved by advisor.

2. Management courses:

ACCT

2311

Principles of Accounting

ECON

2301

Macroeconomics

ECON

2302

Microeconomics

BMGT

3340

Management Theory and Practice

BMGT

3354

Human Resources Management

BMDS

3370

Analysis and Decision Making I

BMDS

3371

Analysis and Decision Making II

BMDS

3372

Analysis and Decision Making III

BFIN

3321

Principles of Financial Management

BLAW

3317

Business Law

3. Mathematics and Science courses:

CHEM

1301/1101

Chemical Principles I and Lab

CHEM

1302/1102

Chemical Principles II and Lab

PHYS

2305/2105

Physics I and Lab

PHYS

2306/2106

Physics II and Lab

MATH

2312

Calculus I

MATH

2313

Calculus II

MATH

2314

Differential Equations or MATH 3314 Calculus III

CIS

2325

Personal Productivity

CIS

2000 level or above

Approved by advisor

Pre-Engineering Curriculum

The University offers a pre-engineering curriculum. This 2 or 3-year plan of study will have the student lay a groundwork of mathematics, science and computer courses which can then a) be transferred to a school that offers a four-year bachelor's degree in a branch of engineering, or b) be used as part of a degree plan at this University in an area such as Mathematics, Computer Science, Environmental Science, or Nutrition, or c) be the basis for the Bachelor of Science in Engineering Management (BSEM). Degrees at most four-year universities have many courses in common for the first two years. In addition, nearly all degree programs at other schools have a core curriculum similar to UIW, requiring the student to take classes in other departments at the University.

Requirements for Pre-Engineering:

CHEM

1301/1101

Chemical Principles I and Lab

CHEM

1302/1102

Chemical Principles II and Lab

MATH

2312

Calculus I

MATH

2313

Calculus II

MATH

2314

Differential Equations

PHYS

2305/2105

Physics I and Lab

PHYS

2306/2106

Physics II and Lab

CIS

2325

Personal Productivity

CIS

2000 level or above

Approved by advisor

CIS

3000 level or above

Approved by advisor

ENGR

1201

Introduction to Engineering

ENGR

1310

Engineering Graphics (CAD I)

ENGR

1312

Engineering Design (CAD II)

ENGINEERING PHYSICS MINOR

The minor in Engineering Physics gives Science as well as non-Science majors the opportunity to explore and apply scientific principles in technology and engineering, achieve proficiency in the applications of mathematics in engineering, formulate the design and development of engineering structures, and investigate the physical and engineering issues of air, water, and soil resources in our environment. A principal focus in this minor will be the integration of engineering, science, and mathematics in problem solving.

This minor will be of particular interest to Science majors such as Environmental Science, Chemistry, and Mathematics but the minor is open to anyone with an interest in Engineering Physics. All students though must fulfill the course prerequisites for the upper-level engineering courses due to the advanced nature of the mathematics, engineering, and science topics presented in these courses. The minor is not open to Engineering Management majors since the course work listed in the minor is already part of the required courses in their degree plan.

Requirements for a Minor in Engineering Physics:

18-19 hours, to include PHYS 2305, 2105, 2306, 2106, ENGR 3350, and any two out the following three: ENGR 3455, 4375, 4470

Students may substitute ENGR 4399 Special Topics in Engineering for one of the upper-level engineering course options only with permission from the Chair of the Engineering Department.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE (ENSC)

Environmental Science is an interdisciplinary program designed to prepare students to enter a wide variety of professional careers as well as graduate programs in pollution abatement, conservation, environmental assessment and education. Government, industry and private research groups all provide entry-level positions for environmental scientists. Faculty members are active in environmental research throughout Texas, Mexico, and Central America. The science faculty at University of the Incarnate Word offers unique opportunities for students to become involved in environmental research as undergraduates.

Major requirements for a Bachelor of Science:

78 semester hours in science as follows:

1. 20 semester hours in Biology:

BIOL

1401

Diversity of Life and Laboratory

BIOL

1402

Unity of Life and Laboratory

BIOL

3442

Ecology and Laboratory

BIOL

3471

General Microbiology and Laboratory

BIOL

4482

Aquatic Biology and Laboratory

2. 15 semester hours in Chemistry:

CHEM

1301/1101

Chemistry Principles I and Laboratory

CHEM

1302/1102

Chemistry Principles II and Laboratory

CHEM

3421

Quantitative Analysis and Laboratory

CHEM

4360

Advanced Chemical Research

3. 15 semester hours in Environmental Science:

ENSC

1410

Environmental Science

ENSC

3410

Research in Soil Conservation

ENSC

4305

Environmental Science Internship

ENSC

4460

Research in Water Quality

4. 8 semester hours in Geology:

GEOL

1401

Physical Geology

GEOL

3450

Environmental Geology

5. 8 semester hours in Physics:

PHYS

2305/2105

Physics I and Laboratory

PHYS

2306/2106

Physics II and Laboratory

6. 3 semester hours in Mathematics:

MATH

2312

Calculus I

7. 3 semester hours in Meteorology:

METR

3340

Hydrology

8. BIOL/CHEM/GEOL/METR Advanced Elective 3 hours

9. 3 semester hours of elective

Contact Department Chair in Environmental Science for specific Core course requirements.

Requirements for a Minor in Environmental Science for Biology Majors:

Biology majors must complete 18 hours in the following Environmental Science courses: ENSC 1410, 2410, 3410, 4305, and 4415. Optional courses that can substitute for one of the upper-level courses (except Environmental Science Internship): ENSC 4460, 4499. Contact Department Chair in Biology or Environmental Science for further information on this minor.

Requirements for a Minor in Environmental Science for Chemistry Majors:

Chemistry majors must complete 18 hours in the following Environmental Science courses: ENSC 1410, 2315, 4203, 4301, 4302, 4305. Contact Department Chair in Chemistry or Environmental Science for further information on this minor.

GEOLOGY (GEOL)

Geology is a science involving the study of the Earth's origin, evolution, and continued development through time. Knowledge of the Earth requires understanding the physical, chemical, and biological processes that shape the Earth's surface, and the physical and chemical processes that operate beneath the Earth's surface. The uniqueness of life on this planet is explored through the study of the origin and evolution of life on Earth.

Requirements for a Minor in Geology:

20 hours, to include GEOL 1401, 1402, 3410, 3450 and 3460

MATHEMATICS (MATH)

The mathematics program emphasizes concepts, procedures, and connections. All courses develop reasoning abilities along with skills in precise communication of concepts. Problem solving is addressed throughout the program. Mathematics majors are well prepared for jobs requiring expertise in quantitative analysis and problem solving, and for a wide variety of graduate and professional programs.

Major Requirements for a Bachelor of Arts:

36 semester hours in Mathematics including:

MATH

2312

Calculus I

MATH

2313

Calculus II

MATH

2303

Introduction to Probability & Statistics

MATH

2322

Linear Algebra

MATH

3335

Geometry & Proof

MATH

3320

Foundations of Higher Mathematics

and 18 hours of elective mathematics courses selected from the following:

MATH

2314

Differential Equation

MATH

3340

History of Mathematics

MATH

3355

Introduction to Numerical Analysis

MATH

3360

Discrete Mathematics

MATH

4431

Introduction to Probability Theory

MATH

4341

Modern Geometry

MATH

4348

Introduction to Number Theory

MATH

4378

Statistics

Major Requirements for a Bachelor of Science:

36 semester hours in Mathematics including:

MATH

2312

Calculus I

MATH

2313

Calculus II

MATH

3314

Calculus III

MATH

3320

Foundations of Higher Mathematics

MATH

3325

Abstract Algebra and Number Theory

MATH

3350

Introduction to Real Analysis

and 18 hours of elective mathematics courses selected from the following:

MATH

2314

Differential Equation

MATH

3340

History of Mathematics

MATH

3355

Introduction to Numerical Analysis

MATH

3360

Discrete Mathematics

MATH

4431

Introduction to Probability Theory

MATH

4341

Modern Geometry

MATH

4348

Introduction to Number Theory

MATH

4378

Statistics

Additional requirements: one computer language course and Physics 2305 or 2306 with a lab.

Both the BA and the BS in mathematics require a minor in an approved discipline, or an approved interdisciplinary minor.

Requirements for a Minor in Mathematics:

18 semester hours, to include MATH 2312, 2313, and at least 9 hours of upper-division courses.

METEOROLOGY (METR)

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The Meteorology degree program is designed for students who wish to receive a comprehensive education for the purpose of research into the dynamics of the Earth's atmosphere, weather analysis, and weather forecasting. This science includes a study of the impact of air pollution on people and the environment, the threat of changing climate due to global warming, severe weather, and world climates. Meteorology is an interdisciplinary program which prepares students for entering a wide variety of professional careers as well as graduate programs in weather modeling and forecasting, air pollution studies, broadcast meteorology, hydrology, Geographic Information Systems (GIS) applications in meteorology, and education. Government, industry, and private research groups may also provide entry level positions for meteorologists. Students are required to minor in mathematics as part of the preparation required for graduate school or for careers in applied meteorology or meteorology research.

Major requirements for a Bachelor of Science:

81 semester hours in science as follows:

1. 55 semester hours in Meteorology:

METR

1325

Natural Hazards

METR

1360

Climatology

METR

1430

Meteorology

METR

3310

Remote Sensing

METR

3315

Synoptic Meteorology I

METR

3335

Severe Weather

METR

3345

Statistical Climatology

METR

3355

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in Meteorology

METR

3360

Satellite Meteorology

METR

3320

Forecasting I

METR

3325

Thermodynamic Meteorology

METR

3330

Forecasting II

METR

3340

Hydrology

METR

3350

Synoptic Meteorology II

METR

4315

Air Pollution Meteorology

METR

4325

Climate Modeling

METR

4371

Special Topics (6 hours)

 

 

 

2. 8 semester hours in Geology:

GEOL

1415

Astronomy

GEOL

1420

Oceanography

3. 18 hours with a Minor in Mathematics that includes MATH 1311, 2312, 2313, 3314, 3350, and 3355.

BROADCAST METEOROLOGY (METB)

The Meteorology program offers a Bachelor of Science degree in Broadcast Meteorology for students who wish to enter careers in cable, satellite, and regular broadcast TV, and radio. The course work in this degree program will fulfill the National Weather Association (NWA) and the American Meteorological Society (AMS) course educational requirements, however all other requirements to earn the Seals of Approval from the AMS and NWA are the responsibilities of the student and are not part of this program. Twenty courses including a Workshop are required for a total of 62 credit hours to complete the degree program. The Workshop includes a 3-week training session involving on-camera presentation of weather forecasts. Students must separately meet the requirements of the NWA or AMS to earn a Seal of Approval for weathercasters. The proposed degree program does not provide a Seal of Approval but provides sufficient training and course work to prepare students to fulfill the educational requirements for the NWA or AMS Seal of Approval. The Broadcast Meteorology program also requires 9 credit hours of Communication Arts courses that include COMM 2358 Video Production I and two additional courses selected from the following: COMM 3353, 3380, 3390, and 4352.

Major requirements for a Bachelor of Science:

81 semester hours in science and other courses as follows:

1. 55 semester hours in Meteorology:

METR

1325

Natural Hazards

METR

1360

Climatology

METR

1430

Meteorology

METR

3310

Remote Sensing

METR

2315

Synoptic Meteorology I

METR

2320

Severe Weather

METR

2325

Statistical Climatology

METR

2330

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in Meteorology

METR

2335

Satellite Meteorology

METR

3320

Forecasting I

METR

3325

Thermodynamic Meteorology

METR

3330

Forecasting II

METR

3340

Hydrology

METR

3350

Synoptic Meteorology II

METR

4310

Weathercasting I

METR

4320

Weathercasting II

METR

4371

Special Topics (6 hours)

2. 14 semester hours in Geology:

GEOL

1311

World Geography

GEOL

1321

Physical Geography

GEOL

1415

Astronomy

GEOL

1420

Oceanography

3. 9 semester hours in Communication Arts courses that include COMM 2358 Video Production I and two additional courses selected from the following:

COMM 3353, 3380, 3390, and 4352.

4. 3 semester hours in MATH 1304 College Algebra or MATH 1306 College Geometry

NUTRITION (NUTR)

The Nutrition curriculum integrates the study of biology, chemistry, behavioral sciences, business, and communication into the various areas of nutrition. Graduates of the UIW Nutrition Program are employed in the following areas associated with food and nutrition: health care, food industry, food service management, community nutrition programs, government agencies, private practice, wellness, and media communication.

Students may select from one of two optional tracks to obtain a Bachelor of Science Degree in Nutrition. Option A focuses on Nutrition and Dietetics, and prepares students for eligibility for a dietetic internship or other supervised practice program in dietetics. The Option A curriculum is externally approved through the Commission on Accreditation for Dietetics Education of The American Dietetic Association. Option B focuses on Nutrition Science, and may be used to fulfill prerequisite requirements for medicine, dentistry, physical therapy, etc., as well as for graduate studies in Nutrition.

Requirements for a Bachelor of Science in Nutrition:

1. 27 semester hours in required Nutrition courses:

NUTR

2231/

2131

Principles of Food Preparation and Laboratory

NUTR

2341

Introduction to Nutrition

NUTR

3342

Nutrition in the Life Cycle

NUTR

4335

Nutrition Education and Counseling

NUTR

4340

Clinical and Nutritional Assessment

NUTR

4460

Community and World Nutrition

NUTR

4470

Human Nutrition and Metabolism

NUTR

4475

Clinical Nutrition

2. 49 semester hours in required supporting disciplines:

PSYC

1301

Introduction to Psychology or

SOCI

1311

Introduction to Sociology

MATH

1304

College Algebra

MATH

2303

Introduction to Probability and Statistics or

SOCI

3381

Statistics for Behavioral Sciences

ECON

2301

Principles of Macroeconomics

SPCH

2341

Business and Professional Communication

BIOL

1402

Unity of Life and Laboratory

BIOL

2421/2422

Anatomy and Physiology I and II and Laboratories

BIOL

2474

Introductory Microbiology and Laboratory or

BIOL

3471

General Microbiology and Laboratory

CHEM

1301/1101

and

1302/1102

Chemical Principles I and II and Laboratories

CHEM

2311/2111

and 2312

Organic Chemistry I and Lab and Organic Chemistry II

CHEM

4351

Biochemistry I

3. Additional semester hours as indicated, in one of the following two options:

A. Nutrition and Dietetics 21 to 24 Hours:

 

ACCT

2301

Accounting for Non-Business Majors

BMGT

3340

Management Theory and Practice or

BMGT

3354

Human Resources Management

NUTR

1102

Introduction to Dietetics

NUTR

3433

Food and Nutrition Services Management I

NUTR

3234/3134

Food and Nutrition Services Management II and Laboratory

NUTR

3332

Experimental Foods

NUTR

4239

Nutrition Practicum or

NUTR

3410

Food Recovery and Gleaning

 

Additional 2-3-semester hour elective

B. Nutrition Science 19 to 20 hours:

 

CHEM

2112

Organic Chemistry II Lab

MATH

2312

Calculus I

PHYS

2305/2105 or

1301 /1101

Physics I or General Physics I and Laboratory

PHYS

2306/2106 or 1302/1102

Physics II or General Physics II and Laboratory

CHEM

4352/4151

Biochemistry II and Biochemistry Laboratory

 

Additional 3-4-semester hour elective in upper-division Biology, Chemistry, or Nutrition.

Requirements for a Minor in Nutrition:

NUTR 2341 is required, plus 9 semester hours of other NUTR courses, 6 of which must be in upper-division courses (3000 and above). Seminar, Practicum, and 1000-level courses do not meet the requirements for a minor.

PHYSICS (PHYS)

Physics is the fundamental science that deals with study of matter and energy and their interactions in the fields of mechanics, heat, fluids, sound, electricity, magnetism, light, optics, radiation, atomic structure, and nuclear phenomena. Physics is an experimental science that involves the continued development of physical theories and models through observations, measurement, and testing. The theoretical and applied concepts of physics are the foundation for the sciences, engineering, and technology.

Requirements for a Minor in Engineering Physics:

18-19 hours, to include PHYS 2305, 2105, 2306, 2106, ENGR 3350, and any two out the following three: ENGR 3455, 4375, 4470

Students may substitute ENGR 4399 Special Topics in Engineering for one of the upper-level engineering course options only with permission from the Chair of the Engineering Department