College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences

Programs Offered

ANTHROPOLOGY (ANTH)

Anthropology promotes a more conscious and balanced perspective on one's own cultural traditions, and an understanding of human cultural and ethnic diversity as well as the common realities that unite us all.

ART (ARTS) and ART HISTORY (ARTH)

The program in Art balances studies in the liberal arts and sciences with studio art and art history. Focal areas include a BA in Studio Art and Art History, a BFA in Studio Art and Art History, a minor in Art, a minor in Art History, and a minor in Photography. Course offerings are designed to develop personal awareness and individual self-expression. The goal of the program is to impart an informed understanding of art through creative work and discerning observation, as well as prepare the student for entry into an MFA program and/or for participation in the professional art world, thus adding to the cultural resources and enrichment of students' lives.

Major Requirements for a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Art:
87 semester hours in Art/Art History as follows:

1. 27 semester hours in Art:

ARTS

1301/2301

Drawing I and II

ARTS

1311/2311

Design I and II

ARTS

ARTS

ARTS

ARTS

ARTS

2320

2351

2357

2361

2342

Painting I

Printmaking I

Photography I

Sculpture I

Ceramics I

2. 6 required hours of lower level art history:

ARTH 2361 Art History: Ancient Through Medieval

ARTH 2362 Art History: Renaissance to Modern

3. 24 semester hours of upper division Art courses:

ARTS 3300 Color Theory for Artists

15 additional hours of a concentration in a single discipline in one of the following areas:

drawing, painting, printmaking, photography, ceramics, or sculpture.

4. 12 additional hours of upper level art history and criticism:

ARTH 3360 Survey in Contemporary Art

ARTH/PHIL 3375 Philosophy of Aesthetics

6 elective hours of upper level art history

5. 18 additional hours of art electives with at least 9 being upper division hours.

Major Requirements for a Bachelor of Arts in Art:

42 semester hours in Art/Art History as follows:

1. 21 semester hours in Art:

ARTS

1301/2301

Drawing I and II

ARTS

1311/2311

Design I and II

ARTS

2320

Painting I

ARTS

3390

Junior Studio

ARTS

4390

Senior Capstone

2. 12 upper division hours in Art (6 of these may be in ARTH)

3. 9 semester hours in Art History:

ARTH

2361

Art History: Ancient through Medieval

ARTH

2362

Art History: Renaissance to Modern upper division hours in Art History

Requirements for a Minor in Art:

ARTS 1301, 1311, 2301, 2311, 2320, and 3 upper division hours in ARTS.

Requirements for a Minor in Art History:

ARTH 2361, 2362, 3360 or 4360, and 6 additional upper division hours in ARTH.

Requirements for a Minor in Photography:

ARTS 1311, ARTS/COMM 2357, ARTS/COMM 3358 ARTH 3357, ARTS 3360 or ARTS 3365, and one of the following: ARTS 3360, ARTS 3365, ARTS 4355, ARTS 4360, ARTS 4388, COMM 1301, COMM 4315, COMM 4350, THAR 3363, or ARTS 4399 Selected Topic in Studio Photography

Recommended Sequence of Courses in the Major for the BFA:

Freshman Year

ARTS

1301

Drawing I

ARTS

1311

Design I

ARTS

2301

Drawing II

ARTS

2311

Design II

Sophomore Year

ARTH

ARTS

ARTS

2361

2320

2357

Art History: Ancient through Medieval

Painting I

Photography I

ARTH

ARTS

ARTS

2362

2351

2342

Art History: Renaissance to Modern

Printmaking I

Ceramics I

ARTS

2361

Sculpture I

Junior Year

ARTH

ARTS

ARTS

3360

3300

3390

Survey in Contemporary Art

Color Theory for Artists

Junior Studio

6 semester hours in upper level courses in the concentration

6 semester hours in upper level art electives

3 semester hours in upper or lower level art electives

Senior Year

ARTH/PHIL

ARTS

3375

4390

Philosophy of Aesthetics

Senior Capstone

6 semester hours in upper level Art History

9 semester hours in upper level courses in the concentration

3 semester hours in upper level art electives

6 semester hours in upper or lower level art electives.

Recommended Sequence of Courses in the Major for the BA:

Freshman Year

ARTS

1301

Drawing I

ARTS

1311

Design I

ARTS

2301

Drawing II

ARTS

2311

Design II

Sophomore

ARTH

2361

Art History: Ancient through Medieval

ARTH

2362

Art Hisory: Renaissance to Modern

ARTH

2320

Painting I

3 semester hours in upper division Art courses.

Junior Year

ARTS

3390

Junior Studio

6 semester hours in upper division Art courses.

3 semester hours in upper division Art History courses.

Senior Year

ARTS

4390

Senior Capstone

3 semester hours in upper division Art courses

CULTURAL STUDIES (CLST)

Cultural Studies is an interdisciplinary field of research and teaching that investigates culture and seeks to create and transform individual experiences, social relations, and power structures. Courses in this field explore the relations between culture, understood as human expressive and symbolic activities, and cultures, understood as distinctive ways of life.

Combining the strengths of the social sciences and the humanities, Cultural Studies draws on methods and theories utilized in traditional disciplines such as literary studies, sociology, anthropology, communication studies, history, philosophy, political economy, psychoanalysis and religious studies, among others. By working across the boundaries of these fields, Cultural Studies addresses new questions and problems arising in today's world. As such, Cultural Studies draws on theories and methods not only from traditional disciplines but also from the growing fields of gender studies, ethnic studies, post-colonial studies, feminism, and media studies. In doing so, it addresses debates concerning the theory of texts and their production; the relationship between culture and politics; the formation of knowledge and institutions; and the nature of cultural antagonisms and crises. In short, Cultural Studies is more than a single body of theory or methods; rather, it is a series of interrelated questions and answers drawn from numerous disciplines.

Students of Cultural Studies will develop flexible tools enabling them to analyze the rapidly changing global environment in which we live. They will learn how to interpret how different aspects of our social world (gender, race, ethnicity, religion, socio-economic class, etc.) influence how we see our world. The process of doing Cultural Studies involves both students and faculty in the dynamic investigation of personal and social values, social location, and the formation of social institutions and worldviews.

Major Requirements for a Bachelor of Arts in Cultural Studies:
36 semester hours

1. Required CLST Courses (15 semester hours)

CLST

2315

Introduction to Cultural Studies

CLST

2320

Cultural Studies Method: Inquiry and Evidence

CLST

3325

Cultural Studies Theory

CLST

3110, 3115, 3120

Cultural Studies Colloquia (three 1-hour courses to be taken in the junior and senior years)

CLST

4310

Senior Seminar

2. Required CORE Course

ANTH

1311

Cultural Anthropology

3. CLST -approved electives (18 semester hours; 12 must be upper |division)

ANTH

3232

Cultural and Cross-Cultural Communication

ARTH

1310

Masterworks of World Art

ARTH

2361

Art History: Ancient Through Medieval

ARTH

2362

Art History: Renaissance to Modern

ARTH

3360

Survey in Contemporary Art

ARTH

3350

Latin American Art: 20th Century

ARTH

3357

History of Photography

ARTH

3375

Aesthetics: Philosophy of Art and Beauty

ARTH

4360

Issues in Contemporary Art

ARTH

4350

Modern Art of Mexico

ARTS

2357

Photography I

ARTS

3358

Digital Photography

ARTS

3360

Photography II: Documentary Photography

ARTS

3365

Photography II: Directorial Photography

ARTS

4360

Art Photography: Manipulated Images

BINT

3350

Latin American Economics

BMKT

3331

Principles of Marketing

BMKT

3333

Fundamentals of Advertising

BMKT

3340

Retailing

BMKT

3377

Consumer Behavior

COMM

1301

Introduction to Mass Communications

COMM

2310

Theories of Communication

COMM

2357

Photography I

COMM

3320

Aesthetics of Vision and Sound

COMM

3330

Impact of Media on Society

COMM

4305

Communications, Technology and Society

COMM

4315

Media Ethics

COMM

4322

Seminar in Selected Film Topics

COMM

4348

Journalism History

COMM

4350

Photojournalism

ENGL

2360

Literary Theory

ENGL

2383

Introduction to General Linguistics

ENGL

3310

English Literature Survey

ENGL

3320

American Literature Survey

ENGL

3330

Genre Studies

ENGL

3355

Introduction to Rhetorical Theory

ENGL

4320

Period Studies

ENGL

4350

Literary Movements

FMGT

1331

Psychology of Clothing

FMER

2381

Fashion Merchandising

FMER

2383

Visual Merchandising

GEOG

3311

Cultural Geography

GEOG

3312

Geography and Ethnic Groups of Texas and the Southwest

HIST

2322

Texas History

HIST

3324

Colonial America

HIST

3331

Colonial Latin America

HIST

3332

Latin America Since Independence

HIST

4332

Mexico

HIST

4341

Making History

HIST

4350

Selected Topics in World History

HIST

4352

Selected Topics in U.S. History

MUSI

2346

History of Jazz

MUSI

3348

Studies in World Music

PHIL

3315

Philosophy of Human Nature

PHIL

3318

Theories of Reality and Knowledge

PHIL

3320

Philosophy of Love

PHIL

3332

Ethics

PHIL

3351

Ancient Philosophy

PHIL

3352

Medieval Philosophy

PHIL

3353

Modern Philosophy

PHIL

3354

Contemporary Philosophy

PHIL

3355

World Philosophy

PHIL

3365

Philosophy of Religion

PHIL

3370

Philosophy of Science and Technology

PHIL

3375

Aesthetics: Philosophy of Art and Beauty

PHIL

3385

Justice: Tradition and Transformation

PHIL

3395

Feminist Philosophy

PHIL

3390

Philosophy of Black Music

POLS

1391

Human Rights

POLS

2310

Comparative Politics

POLS

2350

Environmental Politics

POLS

3356

Terrorism and Conflict in the International Arena

POLS

3371

Political Theory

POLS

4325

Political Behavior

POLS

4355

Politics of Developing Areas

POLS

4363

Political Globalization

POLS

4387

Topics in Comparative Politics/ International Relations

PSYC

3330

Human Sexuality

PSYC

3331

Abnormal Psychology

PSYC

3351

Social Psychology

PSYC

3385

Multicultural Issues

RELS

1345

Biblical Themes

RELS

2330

Religion, Values and Film

RELS

2335

US Latino/a Spirituality

RELS

2345

World Religions

RELS

3300

The Religious Quest

RELS

3305

Catholic Social Teaching

RELS

3322

Christianity Through Art

RELS

3335

God and Human Sexuality

RELS

3340

Feminist Theology

RELS

3350

Environmental Theology and Ethics

RELS

4300

Women and Faith

RELS

4310

Women in the Christian Tradition

RELS

4320

US Latino/a Theology and Culture

RELS

4330

Death and Belief

RELS

4345

Theologies of Liberation

SOCI

2335

Social Issues Through Cinema

SOCI

3321

Social Problems and Social Justice

SOCI

3322

Crime and Delinquency

SOCI

3332

Culturology and Cross-Cultural Communication

SOCI

3344

Social Stratification

SOCI

3350

Sociology of Sport

SOCI

3351

Social Psychology

SOCI

3371

Minority Relations

SOCI

3372

Hispanics in America

SPAN

3311

Culture and Civilization of Spain

SPAN

3312

Culture and Civilization of Latin America

SPAN

3343

The Literature of US Hispanics

THAR

1381

Theatre Appreciation

Requirements for a Minor in Cultural Studies:
21 semester hours

1. Required CLST courses (12 hours)

CLST

2315

Introduction to Cultural Studies

CLST

2320

Cultural Studies Method: Inquiry and Evidence

CLST

3325

Cultural Studies Theory

CLST

3110, 3115, 3120

Cultural Studies Colloquia (three 1-hour courses to be taken in the Junior and Senior years)

2. Required Core Course

ANTH

1311

Cultural Anthropology

3. CLST - approved electives (6 hours; all must be upper division)

See list of approved courses above.

DANCE (DANC)

Dance courses offer a way of knowing that integrates the body with other fields of knowledge for the development of the whole person. The program offers all students the opportunity to study dance in a nurturing environment wherein each student's physical form and capacity for movement is accepted as worthwhile and unique. Dance courses are offered at the beginning, intermediate, and advanced levels in a number of different styles to meet the varied needs and interests of students.

ENGLISH (ENGL)

The English Program at UIW is committed to the development of reading, thinking, and writing skills in all of the University's students. This commitment extends the university's mission: through the analysis of language and literature, students find their own voice by way of critical study of other voices.

The study of English develops reading, thinking, and writing skills. Close reading of texts through critical and theoretical frames, and the production of clear and logically-argued writing are foundations that prepare for any profession; administration, business, writing, teaching, law, and diplomatic and social services are all apt careers for English majors.

Employers value English graduates for their analytical and communication skills and imaginative creativity; the English Program at UIW reinforces these skills in its program of study. In addition, the program recognizes that many English students elect Graduate Studies; thus, upper division courses provide opportunity for students to hone their research skills and to participate in scholarly discourse outside the local university community.

Preparations for academia, employment in corporate or government sectors, and life experience are enhanced by English literary and cultural studies, which encourage students' expressive and analytical responses to their own and others' social identities, and societal and natural environments, both local and global. Consequently, every course in the program, whether dealing with literature, linguistics, language arts, or writing, has a global dimension.

The English faculty is committed to a rotation of course offerings that is sequential and flexible, covering literature and language, theory and practice. Thus, the department offers courses from the following categories: Core, Surveys, Literary Studies and Criticism, Language Arts and Linguistics, Rhetoric and Professional Writing, and Senior Seminar.

Major Requirements for Bachelor of Arts in English:

1. 36 semester hours in English (27 hours above the core).

A. Core (9 hours)

ENGL

1311

Composition I

ENGL

1312

Composition II

ENGL

2310

World Literature Studies

B. Surveys (6 hours)

ENGL

3310

English Literature Survey

ENGL

3320

American Literature Survey

C. Electives (18 hours)

Students must take at least 6 hours from the Literary Studies and Criticism Branch:

ENGL

2360

Literary Theory

ENGL

3330

Genre Studies

ENGL

4320

Period Studies

ENGL

4340

Major Authors

ENGL

4350

Literary Movements

Students must take at least 3 hours from the Language Arts and Linguistics Branch:

ENGL

2330

Traditional Grammar

ENGL

2383

Introduction to General Linguistics

ENGL

3385

Integrated Language Arts

ENGL

4367

Literature for Children and Young Adults

ENGL

4360

Applied Linguistics

ENGL

4370

Trends in Linguistics

Students must take at least 3 hours from the Rhetoric and Professional Writing Branch:

ENGL

2365

Professional and Technical Communication

ENGL

3355

Introduction to Rhetorical Theory

ENGL

3365

Editing and Publishing

ENGL

3375

Creative Writing

ENGL

4310

Writing for the Computer Industry

And 6 additional hours of English Elective courses chosen from any of the above branches.

D. ENGL 4301 Senior Seminar (capstone course)

2. The minimum GPA requirement for a "major" is 2.75 overall, and 3.0 in English.

3. Special Topics and Independent Study

From time to time, the English Department may offer a course that is unrelated to the above descriptions. Such courses will be widely publicized and offered as Special Topics.

Under exceptional circumstances, a student may propose a course of study that is not covered by existing courses. If a faculty member is agreeable, this may then be followed as an Independent Study. Independent Study is NOT intended as a way of replacing an incomplete course or one that has been closed.

4. English may be taken with a minor of 18 hours, with a minimum of 6 hours at the advanced level. Subjects that may be studied include visual art, history, philosophy, cultural studies a social science, business administration, or a concentration in a business-related field.

Requirements for a Minor in English:

1. 21 hours in English (12 above the core)

A. Core (9 hours)

ENGL

1311

Composition I

ENGL

1312

Composition II

ENGL

2310

World Literature Studies

B. Survey (3 hours)

1 of either the English Literature or American Literature Surveys

C. Electives (9 hours)

1 course from each of the 3 branches listed above.

Recommended Sequence of Courses in the Major:

Freshman Year

ENGL

1311

Composition I

ENGL

1312

Composition II

ENGL

2310

World Literature Studies

Sophomore Year

ENGL

2360

Literary Theory

ENGL

3310

English Literature Survey

ENGL

3320

American Literature Survey

At least 1 course from one of the three main branches listed above

Junior Year

Complete Literature Survey courses, if needed

At least 1 course from two of the main branches listed above

Senior Year

Complete the remaining elective course requirements in the major

ENGL

4301

Senior Seminar

HISTORY (HIST)

The mission of the History Department is to provide majors with a firm grounding in the tools of historiography, research, analysis and writing. The Department also provides course work to the general students population in light of its commitment to the mission of the University to produce enlightened, aware citizens of the world.

The curriculum in History leads students to appreciate the development of the contemporary world through the interaction of diverse forces over space and time. The history department supports the global initiatives of the University through its courses in both world and United States history. The study of history involves analysis and integration of a broad range of knowledge. Students acquire skills that prepare them for graduate school or a variety of careers.

Major requirements for a Bachelor of Arts in History:
39 semester hours in History as follows:

1. 15 semester hours in History:

HIST

1311

World History, part I

HIST

1312

World History, part II

HIST

1321

The United States to 1865

HIST

1322

The United States since 1865

HIST

4341

Making History

2. 9 semester hours to be selected from the following United Stated History courses:

HIST

3324

Colonial America

HIST

3325

U.S. National Period

HIST

3326

The Rise of Modern America, 1870-1920

HIST

3327

The United States from World War I to World War II

HIST

3328

The United States since 1945

HIST

4352

Selected Topics in U.S. History

3. 9 semester hours to be selected from the following Global History courses

HIST

3331

Colonial Latin America

HIST

3332

Latin America Since Independence

HIST

3340

Modern Europe

HIST

4334

History of Portuguese America

HIST

4350

Selected Topics in World History

4. 6 additional hours (upper or lower) hours that, in addition to the courses listed above, can include the following:

HIST

2322

Texas History

HIST

4332

Mexico

5. A minor in an approved discipline, or an approved interdisciplinary concentration.

Requirements for the minor in History

HIST 1311, 1312, 1321, 1322, plus 3 upper division semester hours to be selected from United Studies History courses and 3 upper division semester hours to be selected from the World History courses.

Requirements for a Concentration in Brazilian Studies:

The Brazil Studies Program is an Interdisciplinary Concentration, which brings together History, Foreign Language, and Economics. It greatly expands the horizons of the participants and gives them an in-loco experience of the realities of contemporary Brazil. It prepares students for a short-term internship in Brazil, and it is made up of the following 21 credit hours:

PORT

1311

Portuguese I

PORT

1312

Portuguese II

3 Hours From:

HIST

1311

World History I, or HIST 1312, World History II

HIST

3332

Latin America since Independence

HIST

4334

History of Portuguese America

HIST

4388

Cultural Internship in Brazil

BINT

3350

Latin America Economics

INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (INST)

Program Outline

1. International Studies

* Bachelor of Arts - 44 credit hour

A. Required Courses and Experiences: (17 credit hours)

INST

1310

Introduction to International Studies

INST

3110

International Studies Colloquium (to be repeated once for a total of 2 hours)

INST

4390

International Studies Capstone

B. Research Methods class in approved discipline
C. 6 Hours of Foreign Language beyond the elementary level

D. Study Abroad Experience (May be satisfied through semester abroad or internship abroad)

E. 27 credit hours chosen from the following:

9 hours from Group I: Fine Arts and Humanities courses

9 hours from Group II: Social Science and Business courses

9 hours electives in any combination from one or both groups

Group I: Fine Arts and Humanities:

ARTH

2361

Art History: Ancient through Medieval

ARTH

2362

Art History: Renaissance to Modern

ARTH

3350

Latin American Art: 20th Century

ARTH

3357

History of Photography

ARTH

4350

Modern Art of Mexico

CLST

3325

Cultural Studies Theory

CLST

2320

Cultural Studies Method: Inquiry and Evidence

CLST

4399

Selected Topics in Cultural Studies

ENGL

2310

World Literature Studies

ENGL

4320

Period Studies- when appropriate

ENGL

4340

Major Authors- when appropriate

ENGL

4350

Literary Movements

HIST

1311

World History I

HIST

1312

World History II

HIST

3331

Colonial Latin America

HIST

3332

Latin America since Independence

HIST

4334

History of Portuguese America

HIST

3340

Modern Europe

HIST

4350

Selected Topics in World History

HIST

4332

Mexico

MUSI

3348

Studies in World Music

PHIL

3325

Philosophy of Culture

PHIL

3355

World Philosophy

PHIL

3385

Justice: Tradition and Transformation

RELS

2345

World Religions

RELS

3322

Christianity through ART

RELS

4345

Theologies of Liberation

SPAN

3311

Culture and Civilization of Spain

SPAN

3312

Culture and Civilization of Latin America

Group II: Social Sciences and Business:

ANTH

1311

Cultural Anthropology

ANTH/SOCI

3232/3332

Culturology and Cross-Cultural Communication

ECON

2301

Macroeconomics

ECON

4310

International Economics

ECON/BINT

4350

Latin America Economics

BINT

3331

International Business Management

BINT

3345

International Accounting

BINT

3355

International Banking and Finance

BINT

3361

International Marketing

BINT/ECON

4350

Latin America Economics

BINT

4390

International Policies and Relations (Study Abroad)

POLS

1391

Human Rights

POLS

2350

Environmental Politics

POLS

2375

International Organizations

POLS

2376

Model Organization of American States

POLS

3356

Terrorism and Conflict in the International Arena

POLS

4321

U.S. Foreign Policy

POLS

4330

International Law

POLS

4355

Politics of Developing Countries

POLS

4363

Political Globalization

POLS

4387

Topics in International Relations

SOCI

3371

Minority Relations

SOCI

3372

Hispanics in America

2. International Studies

* Interdisciplinary Concentration (18 hours)

Required courses and experiences for the interdisciplinary concentration in International Studies:

A. INST 1310 Introduction to International Studies

B. Research Methods class in approved discipline
C. Study Abroad Experience: May be satisfied through semester abroad or internship abroad.

D. 12 credit hours chosen from the following:

6 hours from Group I: Fine Arts and Humanities courses

6 hours from Group II: Social Science and Business courses

Group I: Fine Arts and Humanities:

ARTH

2361

Art History: Ancient through Medieval

ARTH

2362

Art History: Renaissance to Modern

ARTH

3350

Latin American Art: 20th Century

ARTH

3357

History of Photography

ARTH

4350

Modern Art of Mexico

CLST

3325

Culture Studies Theory

CLST

2320

Cultural Studies Method: Inquiry and Evidence

CLST

4399

Selected Topics in Cultural Studies

ENGL

2310

World Literature Studies

ENGL

4320

Period Studies-when appropriate

ENGL

4340

Major Authors-when appropriate

ENGL

4350

Literary Movements

HIST

1311

World History I

HIST

1312

World History II

HIST

3331

Colonial Latin America

HIST

3332

Latin America since Independence

HIST

4334

History of Portuguese America

HIST

3340

Modern Europe

HIST

4350

Selected Topics in World History

HIST

4332

Mexico

MUSI

3348

Studies in World Music

PHIL

3325

Philosophy of Culture

PHIL

3355

World Philosophy

PHIL

3385

Justice: Tradition and Transformation

RELS

2345

World Religions

RELS

3322

Christianity through Art

RELS

4345

Theologies of Liberation

SPAN

3311

Culture and Civilization of Spain

SPAN

3312

Culture and Civilization of Latin America

Group II: Social Sciences and Business:

ANTH

1311

Cultural Anthropology

ANTH/SOCI

3232/3332

Culturology and Cross-Cultural Communication

ECON

2301

Macroeconomics

ECON

4310

International Economics

ECON/BINT

4350

Latin America Economics

BINT

3331

International Business Management

BINT

3345

International Accounting

BINT

3355

International Banking and Finance

BINT

3361

International Marketing

BINT/ECON

4350

Latin America Economics

BINT

4390

International Policies and Relations (Study Abroad)

POLS

1391

Human Rights

POLS

2350

Environmental Politics

POLS

2375

International Organizations

POLS

2376

Model Organization of American States

POLS

3356

Terrorism and Conflict in the International Arena

POLS

4321

U.S. Foreign Policy

POLS

4330

International Law

POLS

4355

Politics of Developing Countries

POLS

4363

Political Globalization

POLS

4387

Topics in Comparative/International Relations

SOCI

3371

Minority Relations

SOCI

3372

Seminar on Hispanics

LIBERAL ARTS

Required Courses of the Associate of Arts degree with a major in Liberal Arts:

1. Completion of the following Core Curriculum

A. Rhetoric (6 hours)

ENGL 1311 Composition I

3

ENGL 1312 Composition II

3

B. Literature and The Arts (6 hours)

Literature: ENGL 2310 World Literature Studies

3

Fine Art From Art, Art History, Dance, Music

 

Theatre Arts core selections

3

C. Philosophy and Religious Studies (select 6 hours)

PHIL 1381 Introduction to Philosophy

3

Religious Studies from RELS core selections

3

D. Foreign Language (6 hours)

Select one language from Foreign Language

 

core selection

6

E. History and Social Science (6 hours)

History from HIST core selections

3

Social Science from ANTH, ECON, POLS,

 

PSYC, SOCI core selections

3

F. Lab Science and Mathematics (7 hours)

Science w/Lab from BIOL, CHEM, PHYS,

 

GEOL, core selections

4

MATH 1304 College Algebra

3

G. Wellness Development (3 hours)

DWHP Dimensions of Wellness or DWHP Brige

2

PEHP from Physical Education Selections

1

2. 18 hours that may include selections to satisfy transfer requirements to another four-year institutions or selections of electives for concentrations in areas of interest, or as required for majors specified for baccalaureate degree from the University of the Incarnate Word.

3. 22 Clock hours of Community Service is required

MUSIC (MUAP, MUSI, MUST, MUTH)

The mission of the Music Department at the University of the Incarnate Word is threefold: to develop skilled musicians by educating the minds, ears, and souls of our music students within the liberal arts tradition; to serve the general student population by enriching the CORE curriculum; and to enhance the musical offerings in the UIW and San Antonio communities.

Music students at UIW receive comprehensive instruction in theoretical, historical and stylistic perspectives, and are provided the opportunity for training in music technology. The Music faculty themselves are active performers, composers, clinicians, and scholars who bring practical experience and insight into the classroom. Students are provided with ample performance opportunities through ensemble membership and studio/seminar classes. In accordance with the mission of UIW, the music department encourages the development of musicians who are committed to serving the worldwide community with their art.

NOTE: All students wishing to major or minor in music should contact the Music Department (210-829-3848) for advising before registering for the first semester's classes. Audition and interview required. (See Policies for Entering Freshmen and Transfer Music Majors and Minors further in this section.)

Music majors may choose from among four different degree plans:

Bachelor of Music in Music Education

Major Requirements for the Bachelor of Music in Music Education with a Minor in All Level Education:

(89-96 credit hours in music; 30 hours in education)

The student combines the Bachelor of Music in Music Education with a minor in All Level Education. This degree may require up to ten semesters of study and results in all-level teacher certification at the undergraduate level.

A. 34-38 semester hours of music theory and history:

MUSI

1100

Introduction to Aural Skills (if required, see Policies for Entering Freshmen, page xx)

MUSI

1300

Introduction to Music Theory (if required, see Policies for Entering Freshman, page xx)

MUSI

1191

Aural Skills I

MUSI

1192

Aural Skills II

MUSI

2193

Advanced Aural Skills III

MUSI

2194

Advanced Aural Skills IV

MUSI

1321

Music Theory I

MUSI

1322

Music Theory II

MUSI

2323

Music Theory III

MUSI

3324

Music Theory IV

MUSI

3323

Orchestration

MUSI

3341

Music History I

MUSI

3342

Music History II

MUSI

3348

Studies in World Music

MUSI

4323

Form and Analysis

One upper level elective MUSI course (3 credit hours) (MUSI 1300 Introduction to Music Theory may count as this elective)

B. 37-40 credit hours of applied music:

MUSI

1310

Keyboard Skills for Music Majors (may be exempted by passing the Piano Proficiency)

MUSI

4344

Conducting

21 credit hours of the principal instrument (MUAP)

6 credit hours minimum of a secondary instrument (MUAP)

7 credit hours of a major ensemble: Chorale, Orchestra, Wind Ensemble, or Jazz Ensemble

Recital:

Students seeking a B.M. in Music Education will perform a recital on their principal instrument during the final semester of their private instruction. See Recital Policies further in this section, and the private instruction course syllabus for specifics.

C. 18 credit hours of music education courses.

MUSI

3343

Pedagogy of Contemporary Music

MUSI

3344

Creative Development in Music I

MUSI

3345

Brass and Woodwind Instrument Techniques

MUSI

3346

String and Percussion Instrument Techniques

MUSI

3361

Vocal Techniques and Diction

MUSI

4343

Creative Development in Music II

All Level Minor in Education:

Students should consult with the UIW Certification Officer (Constance Sabo, 210-829-3134) for more details or changes concerning the minor in All Level Education.

A. 6 credit hours Pre-Professional Requirements:

EDUC

2305

Foundations of Education

EDUC

4345

Creative Play and Play Environments

Admission into Teacher Education Program (no credit hours given)

B. 24 credit hours Professional Development Sequence:

EDUC

3340

Technology in Education

EDUC

3370

Teaching Diverse Populations

EDUC

3373

Learning Theories

EDUC

3380

Pedagogy in the Secondary and Middle School

EDUC

3383

Integrative Pedagogy in the Secondary and Middle School

EDUC

4305

Teacher Apprenticeship Seminar

EDUC

4605

Teacher Apprenticeship

Bachelor of Music in Music Therapy

Major requirements for a Bachelor of Music in Music Therapy:

(90-94 credit hours in music; 19 credit hours in required science and math)

A. 28-32 credit hours of music theory and history:

MUSI

1100

Introduction to Aural Skills (if required, see Policies for Entering Freshman)

MUSI

1300

Introduction to Music Theory (if required, see Policies for Entering Freshman)

MUSI

1191

Aural Skills I

MUSI

1192

Aural Skills II

MUSI

2193

Advanced Aural Skills III

MUSI

2194

Advanced Aural Skills IV

MUSI

1321

Music Theory I

MUSI

1322

Music Theory II

MUSI

2323

Music Theory III

MUSI

3324

Music Theory IV

MUSI

3341

Music History I

MUSI

3342

Music History II

MUSI

3348

Studies in World Music

One upper level elective MUSI course (3 credit hours) (MUSI 1300 Introduction to Music Theory may count as this elective)

B. 30 credit hours in music development and performance:

 

 

15 total credit hours of private Instruction to be distributed among piano, voice, and guitar as deemed necessary by the music faculty.

MUSI

1310

Keyboard Skills for Music Majors *

MUSI

3345

Brass and Woodwind Instrument Techniques OR

MUSI

3346

String and Percussion Instrument Techniques

MUSI

4344

Conducting

6 credit hours of major ensembles: Chorale, Orchestra, Wind Ensemble, or Jazz Ensemble

*May be exempted by passing the Piano Proficiency.

C. 32 credit hours in music therapy:

MUTH

1300

Introduction to Music Therapy

MUTH

2271

Clinical Orientation

MUTH

2351

Music in Therapy I

MUTH

2352

Music in Therapy II

MUTH

3353

Music in Therapy III

MUTH

2388

Piano Improvisation

MUTH

3301

Psychology of Music

MUTH

3305

Creative Improvisation in Therapy

MUTH

4300

Senior Seminar

MUTH

4301

Music Therapy Internship (must be taken twice for a total of 6 credit hours)**

(**Prior to registering for Music Therapy Internship, all Music Therapy majors must pass the Piano Proficiency and a Piano Improvisation Competency exam, and all coursework must be completed.)

D. 19 credit hours in behavioral/natural sciences (including 13 hours taken as part of the Core, indicated by "***")

PSYC

1301

Introduction to Psychology ***

PSYC

3331

Abnormal Psychology ***

BIOL

2321/2121

Anatomy and Physiology I and Laboratory ***

EDUC

4371

Survey of Exceptionalities

MATH

2303

Introduction to Probability and Statistics ***

One 3 credit hour Psychology elective (selected in consultation with advisor.)

Bachelor of Arts in Music

Major requirements for a Bachelor of Arts in Music:

(58-62 credit hours in music)

A. 34-38 credit hours of music theory and history:

MUSI

1100

Introduction to Aural Skills (if required, see Policies for Entering Freshman, page xx)

MUSI

1300

Introduction to Music Theory (if required, see Policies for Entering Freshman, page xx)

MUSI

1191

Aural Skills I

MUSI

1192

Aural Skills II

MUSI

2193

Advanced Aural Skills III

MUSI

2194

Advanced Aural Skills IV

MUSI

1321

Music Theory I

MUSI

1322

Music Theory II

MUSI

2323

Music Theory III

MUSI

3324

Music Theory IV

MUSI

3323

Orchestration

MUSI

3341

Music History I

MUSI

3342

Music History II

MUSI

3348

Studies in World Music

MUSI

4323

Form and Analysis

One upper level elective MUSI course (3 credit hours)

(MUSI 1300 Introduction to Music Theory may count as this elective)

B. 24 credit hours of applied music:

MUSI

1310

Keyboard Skills for Music Majors*

MUSI

4344

Conducting

12 credit hours of voice or principal instrument (MUAP)

6 credit hours of major ensembles: Chorale, Orchestra, Wind Ensemble, or Jazz Ensemble

*May be exempted by passing the Piano Proficiency.

Requirements for a Bachelor's of Arts in Music with an Emphasis in
Performance: (67-71 credit hours in music)

A. 34-38 credit hours of music theory and history:

MUSI

1100

Introduction to Aural Skills (if required, see Policies for Entering Freshmen, page xx)

MUSI

1300

Introduction to Music Theory (if required, see Policies for Entering Freshman, page xx)

MUSI

1191

Aural Skills I

MUSI

1192

Aural Skills II

MUSI

2193

Advanced Aural Skills III

MUSI

2194

Advanced Aural Skills IV

MUSI

1321

Music Theory I

MUSI

1322

Music Theory II

MUSI

2323

Music Theory III

MUSI

3324

Music Theory IV

MUSI

3323

Orchestration

MUSI

3341

Music History I

MUSI

3342

Music History II

MUSI

4323

Form and Analysis

MUSI

3348

Studies in World Music

One upper level elective MUSI course (3 credit hours) (MUSI 1300 Introduction to Music Theory may count as this elective)

B. 33 credit hours of applied music

MUSI

1310

Keyboard Skills for Music Majors*

MUSI

4344

Conducting

 

 

18 credit hours in principal instrument (MUAP)

 

 

3 credit hours of piano (or another instrument for piano majors) (MUAP)

 

 

6 credit hours of major ensembles: Chorale, Orchestra, Wind Ensemble, or Jazz Ensemble

*May be exempted by passing the Piano Proficiency

C. Recital:

Students seeking a Bachelor of Arts with an Emphasis in Performance will perform a recital on their principal instrument. See Recital Permission Policy (further in this section) and the private instruction course syllabus for specifics.

Requirements for the Bachelor's of Arts in Music with an Emphasis
in Composition (70-74 credit hours in music)

A. 34-38 credit hours of music theory and history:

MUSI

1100

Introduction to Aural Skills (if required, see Policies for Entering Freshmen, page xx)

MUSI

1300

Introduction of Music Theory (if required, see Policies for Entering Freshman, page xx)

MUSI

1191

Aural Skills I

MUSI

1192

Aural Skills II

MUSI

2193

Advanced Aural Skills III

MUSI

2194

Advanced Aural Skills IV

MUSI

1321

Music Theory I

MUSI

1322

Music Theory II

MUSI

2323

Music Theory III

MUSI

3324

Music Theory IV

MUSI

3323

Orchestration

MUSI

3341

Music History I

MUSI

3342

Music History II

MUSI

4323

Form and Analysis

MUSI

3348

Studies in World Music

One upper level elective MUSI course (3 credit hours) (MUSI 1300 Introduction to Music Theory may count as this elective)

B. 36 credit hours of additional coursework and applied music:

MUSI

1310

Keyboard Skills for Music Majors*

MUSI

3327

Counterpoint

MUSI

4344

Conducting

MUST

2325

Studio Arranging

15 credit hours of Private Instruction: Composition (MUAP 2354, 2355, 3354, 3355, 4354)

3 credit hours of a secondary instrument (MUAP Piano highly recommended)

6 credit hours of major ensembles: Chorale, Orchestra, Wind Ensemble, or Jazz Ensemble

*May be exempted by passing the Piano Proficiency

C. Recital:

Students seeking a B.A. with an Emphasis in Composition will perform a senior composition recital that will be at least 1/2 hour in duration. See Recital Permission Policy (further in this section) and composition private instruction syllabus for further details.

Bachelor of Arts in Music Industry Studies

Major requirements for a Bachelor of Arts with an emphasis in Music Industry Studies (46-50 credit hours in music; 20 credit hours in Music Industry courses; 18 credit hours in business):

A. 25-29 credit hours of music theory and history:

MUSI

1100

Introduction to Aural Skills (if required, see Policies for Entering Freshman, page xx )

MUSI

1300

Introduction to Music Theory (if required, see Policies for Entering Freshman, page xx)

MUSI

1191

Aural Skills I

MUSI

1192

Aural Skills II

MUSI

2193

Advanced Aural Skills III

MUSI

2194

Advanced Aural Skills IV

MUSI

1321

Music Theory I

MUSI

1322

Music Theory II

MUSI

2323

Music Theory III

MUSI

3324

Music Theory IV

MUSI

3341

Music History I

MUSI

3342

Music History II

MUSI

3348

Studies in World Music

B. 20 credit hours of Music Industry courses.

MUST

2259

Introductory Internship to Music Industry Studies

MUST

2340

Introduction to Music Industry Studies

MUST

2350

Music Industry Studies II

MUST

2325

Studio Arranging

MUST

3305

Record Production

MUST

3320

Web Design For Music Applications

MUST

4359

Internship in Music Industry Studies

C. 21 credit semester hours of applied music:

MUSI

1310

Keyboard Skills for Music Majors*

MUSI

4344

Conducting

9 credit hours of voice or principal instrument (MUAP)

6 credit hours of major ensembles: Chorale, Orchestra, Wind Ensemble, or Jazz Ensemble

*May be exempted by passing the Piano Proficiency

D. 18 credit hours of business, to be chosen from:

ACCT

2301

Accounting for non-Business majors

BLAW

3317

Business Law I

BMGT

3340

Management Theory and Practice

BMKT

3331

Principles of Marketing

BMKT

3333

Fundamentals of Advertising OR

BMKT

3335

Sales Management

BMGT

3354

Human Resource Management OR

MBGT

4355

Organizational Behavior and Leadership

Requirements for a Minor in Music:

22-26 credit hours

MUSI 1300 (if required), MUSI 1100 (if required), MUSI 1321, MUSI 1322, MUSI 3342, Private Instruction (MUAP, 6 credit hours), Major Ensemble (4 credit hours), 3 credit hours upper-division elective (MUSI 3XXX)

Requirements for a Minor in Music Therapy:

21-25 credit hours

MUSI 1300 (if required), MUSI 1100 (if required), MUSI 1321, Major Ensemble (1 hour), 3 credit hours of Private Instruction, MUSI 1311 or 1381 or 1391, MUTH 1301; followed by MUTH 3301, MUTH 3305 and MUTH 1271

Policies for Entering Freshman and Transfer Music Majors and Minors

All students who intend to be music majors or minors must register for: MUSI 1321 (Music Theory I) and MUSI 1191 (Aural Skills I) in the first semester, OR MUSI 1100 (Introduction to Aural Skills) and MUSI 1300 (Introduction to Music Theory) in the second semester, depending upon how the student scored on the theory diagnostic exam (see below).

Anyone seeking a B.M. in Music Education or a B.A. with an Emphasis in Performance or Composition must register for both a private lesson (classes designated as MUAP) and a major ensemble from those listed below. All students on music scholarship must register for one of the major ensembles every semester:

Major Ensembles:

UIW Chorale MUSI 1131

UIW Community Orchestra MUSI 1181

UIW Jazz Ensemble MUSI 1182

UIW Wind Ensemble MUSI 1185

It is strongly recommended that all entering music majors and minors sign up for a private lesson (classes designated as MUAP), and that entering freshmen participate in one of the ensembles listed above.

Transfer Students

Transfer students must participate in four semesters of major ensembles (see list above) at University of the Incarnate Word. Transfer students in Teacher Certification must participate in at least three semesters of major ensembles at the University of the Incarnate Word.

Transfer students should consult with the Chair of the Music Department (210-829-3848) upon arrival to the UIW campus.

Additional information for all music students:

Recital Permission Policy for All Students

PHILOSOPHY (PHIL)

The Department of Philosophy at the University of the Incarnate Word seeks to provide its students with a broad orientation to the major branches of philosophy (metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, and logic) and to the various ways philosophy has progressed throughout human history (in Western and other global traditions).The primary goal of our program, however, is not merely to promote mastery of philosophical content, but to help cultivate the philosophical spirit by nourishing our students' responsiveness to the wonder of being, their commitment to justice, and their overall capacity to explore philosophical issues with creativity and critical insight.

Philosophy is an exploration of the most basic yet wide-ranging issues of human life and experience. The study of philosophy involves the rational examination of such fundamental notions as truth, beauty, goodness, justice, freedom, reality, knowledge, language, faith, love, death, and God. Its purpose is to broaden the reach of possibilities that all human beings share in their efforts to create intellectually and spiritually meaningful lives.

Philosophy also examines the foundations, processes, and aims of other disciplines - such as science, mathematics, law, and education, for example - and reflects on such subjects as religion, art, history, literature, health care, and technology.

Major Requirements for a Bachelor of Arts:

33 semester hours of Philosophy, as follows:

1. 27 semester hours of required courses:

PHIL

1381

Introduction to Philosophy

PHIL

3312

Logic

PHIL

3318

Theories of Reality and Knowledge

PHIL

3332

Ethics

PHIL

3351

Ancient Philosophy

PHIL

3352

Medieval Philosophy

PHIL

3353

Modern Philosophy

PHIL

3354

Contemporary Philosophy

PHIL

3355

World Philosophy

2. 6 additional upper division hours in Philosophy

3. A minor in any field, or an interdisciplinary minor approved by the philosophy advisor.

Requirements for a Minor in Philosophy:

PHIL 1381, 3312, 3318, 3332; a choice of one: PHIL 3351, 3352, 3353, 3354 or 3355; 3 additional upper division hours in PHIL.

Recommended Sequence of Courses in the Major:

Freshman Year

PHIL

1381

Introduction to Philosophy (Spring)

PHIL

3312

Logic (Spring)

Sophomore Year

PHIL

3351

Ancient Philosophy (Fall)

PHIL

3352

Medieval Philosophy (Spring)

Junior Year

PHIL

3332

Ethics (Fall)

PHIL

3353

Modern Philosophy (Fall)

PHIL

3354

Contemporary Philosophy (Spring)

PHIL

 

Elective (Spring)

Senior Year

PHIL

3318

Theories of Reality and Knowledge (Spring)

PHIL

3355

World Philosophy (Spring or Fall)

PHIL

 

Elective (Spring or Fall)

POLITICAL SCIENCE (POLS)

The mission of the Political Science Department is to provide the major with a strong foundation to expand awareness and understanding of political life, to stimulate scholarship and intelligent interest in political science, and to provide a framework for enriching the exposure of majors and the wider university community to the study of government and issues of public concern. Moreover, the Department offers course work to the general student population in light of its commitment to the CORE Curriculum.

The program in Political Science at the University is especially designed to develop analytical skills, combining organized knowledge with practical experience that introduces and prepares students for career opportunities in the public sector. By selecting appropriate courses and internships, students of politics can prepare themselves for professional training in public policy, public administration, law, graduate education in the policy sciences, as well as employment in government and non-governmental public sector organizations.

Major Requirements for a Bachelor of Arts

39 semester hours in Political Science as follows:

1. 21 semester hours of required courses:

POLS

1315

American Politics

POLS

1316

State and Local Politics

POLS

2300

Social Science Research Methods

POLS

2305

Introduction to Political Studies

POLS

2310

Comparative Politics

POLS

2320

International Relations

SOCI

3381

Statistics for Behavioral Sciences

2. 18 semester hours selected from courses listed under one of the following areas of concentration (A, B):

A. American Politics:

POLS

1391

Human Rights

POLS

2350

Environmental Politics

POLS

2392

U.S. Legal System

POLS

3300

U.S. Congress

POLS

3305

U.S. Presidency

POLS

3353

Texas Legislative Process

POLS

3371

Political Theory

POLS

4315

Constitutional Law and Politics

POLS

4317

Public Policy

POLS

4321

US Foreign Policy

POLS

4325

Political Behavior

COMM

4332

Law and the Media

POLS

4335

Comparative Political Parties

POLS

4385

Topics in American Politics

B. International Relations/Comparative Politics: Students selecting this concentration must complete 9 semester hours of Comparative Politics courses and 9 semester hours of International Relations courses.

Comparative Politics Courses

POLS

1391

Human Rights

POLS

2350

Environmental Politics

POLS

3350

European Politics

POLS

3371

Political Theory

POLS

4335

Comparative Political Parties

POLS

4355

Politics of Developing Countries

POLS

4387

Topics in Comparative Politics/International Relations

International Relations Courses

POLS

2375

International Organizations

POLS

2376

Model Organization of American States

POLS

3356

Terrorism and Conflict in the International Arena

BINT

4310

International Economics

BLAW

4320

International Business Law

POLS

4330

International Law

POLS

4363

Political Globalization

POLS

4387

Topics in Comparative Politics/International Relations

3. Students are strongly encouraged to take at least one internship course. Up to 6 hours of Internships can be substituted for the same number of hours in the area of concentration. To enroll in an internship, students must have a 2.5 GPA overall and a 3.0 GPA in the major.

4. A minor in any other discipline. With the approval of their academic advisor, students may construct an individualized interdisciplinary minor. Political Science majors may not minor in Pre-Law. Those planning to attend law school should select American Politics as their area of concentration within the major.

Requirements for a Minor in Political Science:

POLS 1315, 1316, 2305 and 2310 or 2320; Nine additional semester hours in other POLS courses, 6 of which must be upper division. Internships do not meet requirements for the minor.

Washington Internship

Qualified juniors and seniors have an opportunity to earn up to 15 credit hours (9 hours toward the major) by serving an approved internship in Washington, D.C. for a semester. Placement opportunities include Capitol Hill, the White House, the Department of Justice, the State Department, major law firms, American Civil Liberties Union, U.S. Information Agency, and other government agencies and private sector organizations. Applicants must have a 2.5 overall GPA and a 3.0 GPA in the major and approval of the Department Chair.

Justice and Peace Studies Concentration

A concentration in Justice and Peace Studies ensures that students graduate with an understanding of the theoretical and philosophical underpinnings of justice, the extent to which society is just and how to promote greater justice, and how to practically address the ways in which they can work toward a more just world.

The program is interdisciplinary in nature, drawing upon course and faculty in schools and departments from across the campus. The program takes a broad view of the world and of issues of justice and peace. It is designed to attract students who are preparing for academic, government, nonprofit, or business careers with a focus on justice, peace, and equality and who value the benefits of interdisciplinary learning.

Justice and Peace Studies Concentration (24 hours)

18 hours of the following required courses:

POLS

1315

American Politics

POLS

1391

Human Rights

RELS

1360

Christian Ethics

ARTH

3357

History of Photography

PHIL

3385

Justice: Tradition and Transformation

JUSP

4390

Justice and Peace*

6 hours of the following courses:

ECON

2301

Principles of Macroeconomics

POLS

2350

Environmental Politics

ARTS

2357

Photography

POLS

2392

Introduction to U.S. Legal System

RELS

3305

Catholic Social Teachings

SOCI

3321

Social Problems and Social Justice

SOCI

3323

Criminal Justice

PHIL

3332

Ethics

RELS

3350

Environmental Theology and Ethics

POLS

3356

Terrorism and Conflict in the International Arena

ARTH

3360

Survey in Contemporary Art

ARTS

3365

Art Photography:Directorial Photography

POLS

3371

Political Theory

RELS

4300

Women and Faith

RELS

4345

Theologies of Liberation

POLS

4355

Politics of Developing Areas

POLS

4363

Political Gloabalization

*Students are required to participate in a service learning experience or internship which will be part of the requirements for JUSP 4390. Students will also be encouraged to participate in other service learning opportunities which could be accomplished either through a course or through Alternative Spring Break.

Pre-Law Concentration

A Concentration in Pre-Law is designed to provide a basic political science background for those students who hope to go on to Law school but did not major in political science. It is not available as an option for political science majors or minors.

Requirements for a concentration in Pre-Law:

24 hours of the following required courses:

POLS

1315

American Politics

PHIL

1381

Introduction to Philosophy

SPCH

1311

Public Speaking

POLS

2392

Introduction to U.S. Legal System

PHIL

3312

Logic

6 Hours Upper Division English - 3 Hours Rhetoric and 3 Hours Literature

PHIL 3385 Justice: Tradition and Transformation OR PHIL 3332 Ethics

9 Semester hours from the following courses:

POLS

1391

Human Rights

ECON

2301

Principles of Macroeconomics

POLS

2375

International Organizations

BLAW

3317

Business Law

BLAW

4320

International Business Law

POLS

4315

Constitutional Law and Politics

POLS

4330

International Law

BLAW

4340

Labor and Employment Law

PSYCHOLOGY (PSYC)

Psychology is the scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of humans and other animals. Students will begin to understand how individual thought and behavior is influenced by perception, motivation, heredity, language, cognition, and learning. Instruction focuses on the influence of society and the environment on human personality, and provides insights into the human psyche. Upon the successful completion of the psychology program, students will have an understanding of the major theoretical perspectives for organizing and understanding human behavior.

Major Requirements for a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology:

49-59 semester hours in Psychology as follows:

1. 37 semester hours of required core courses:

PSYC

1301

Introduction to Psychology

PSYC

2310

Critical Thinking and Writing in Psychology

PSYC

2370

Child and Adolescent Development

PSYC

2380

Biology and Behavior

PSYC

3331

Abnormal Psychology

PSYC

3351

Social Psychology

PSYC

3353

Personality

PSYC

3358

Multicultural Issues

PSYC

3472

Learning

PSYC

3381

Statistics for Behavioral Sciences

PSYC

3384

Research Methods

PSYC

4331

History of Psychology

2. 12-22 hours selected from one of four options:

Option A: General Psychology (12 hours)

PSYC

4359

Directed Practicum / Internship

9 semester hours of Psychology electives

Option B: Child and Adolescent Psychology (12 hours)

SOCI

3343

Sociology of the Family

PSYC

4330

Developmental Psychopathology

PSYC

4359

Directed Practicum / Internship

3 semester hours of Psychology electives

Option C: Community Psychology (13 hours)

PSYC

4380

Psychometrics

PSYC

3340

Community Psychology

PSYC

4490

Community Psychology Practicum

3 semester hours of Psychology electives

Option D: Experimental Psychology (22 hours)

PSYC

3376

Cognition & Memory

PSYC

4380

Psychometrics

PSYC

4353

Social Cognition or PSYC 4340 Physiological

Psychology

PSYC

4381

Advanced Statistics

PSYC

4484

Advanced Research Methods

6 semester hours of Psychology electives

**NO MINOR REQUIRED with Option D; students will be directed toward the combination of courses that will best prepare them for their post-graduation goals

3. All psychology majors, EXCEPT those choosing to follow Option D (Experimental track) are required to have a minor in any other discipline. (The semester hours of the minor will vary according to the discipline).

Minor in Psychology:

Requirements are 15 semester hours as follows:

PSYC

1301

Introduction to Psychology

PSYC

3331

Abnormal Psychology or PSYC 3353 Personality

9 semester hours of Psychology electives. (The following 6 semester hours are strongly recommended for those students who plan to pursue a graduate degree in Psychology)

PSYC

3381

Statistics for Behavioral Science

PSYC

3384

Research Methods

Suggested sequence for Major requirements in Psychology:

Freshman Year

PSYC

1301

Introduction to Psychology (Fall)

PSYC

2310

Critical Thinking and Writing in Psychology (Spring)

PSYC

2370

Child and Adolescent Development (Spring)

Sophomore Year

PSYC

2380

Biology and Behavior (Fall or Spring)

PSYC

3331

Abnormal (Fall or Spring)

PSYC

3353

Personality (Spring)

PSYC

3381

Statistics for Behavioral Sciences (Fall)

PSYC

3384

Research Methods (Spring)

Junior Year

PSYC

3351

Social Psychology (Fall)

PSYC

3472

Learning (Fall or Spring)

PSYC

3385

Multicultural Issues (Fall)

Senior Year

PSYC

4331

History of Psychology (Fall or Spring)

**NOTE: Deviations from this sequence may be in order depending upon the track chosen (from A, B, C, or D); students should communicate with their faculty advisors regarding specific track sequencing recommendations.

RELIGIOUS STUDIES (RELS)

In keeping with the University's mission, the Department of Religious Studies has a two-fold mission: to acquaint all students with the Roman Catholic tradition within the broader religious and global context in which they live, and to expose all students to the multidimensional and interdisciplinary methods utilized within the field of religious studies.

Since the University of the Incarnate Word is a Roman Catholic University, the Department believes it is necessary to provide the general student body with an opportunity to understand this tradition. We believe our students must come to terms with the fact of diversity, both religious and cultural. Introductory and intermediate department courses are designed to help them achieve these goals.

The field of religious studies is multidimensional and interdisciplinary. Students interested in majoring in religious studies must be familiar with a variety of dimensions of the field and be acquainted with a number of critical methodologies applicable to the study. Knowledge of both areas provides an academic foundation for advanced study in religious studies. Advanced courses are designed to help them fulfill these goals.

Major Requirements for a Bachelor of Arts:

33 semester hours

1. 15 semester hours from the following:

Biblical Studies (3 semester hours)

RELS

1345

Biblical Themes, or

RELS

2320

Hebrew Scriptures, or

RELS

2350

Gospels and Acts

Theological Studies (3 semester hours)

RELS

1310

Introduction to Theology, or

RELS

1340

Understanding Catholicism

Christianity and Culture (9 semester hours)

RELS

1355

History of Christianity

RELS

1360

Christian Ethics

RELS

2345

World Religions

2. 18 semester hours (15 hours must be upper division, including at least one from each of the following areas below)

Biblical Studies

RELS

1345

Biblical Themes

RELS

2320

Hebrew Scriptures

RELS

2350

Gospel and Acts

RELS

3310

Pauline Writings

RELS

3399

Contemporary Issues

 

 

 

Theological Studies

RELS

1310

Introduction to Theology

RELS

3300

The Religious Quest

RELS

3340

Feminist Theology

RELS

3350

Environmental Theology and Ethics

RELS

3399

Contemporary Issues

RELS

4320

U.S. Latino/a Theology and Culture

RELS

4345

Theologies of Liberation

 

 

 

Christianity and Culture

RELS

2329

Religious Movements in the United States

RELS

2330

Religion, Values, and Film

RELS

3305

Catholic Social Teachings

RELS

3335

God and Human Sexualtiy

RELS

4300

Women and Faith

RELS

4310

Women in the Christian Tradition

RELS

4330

Death and Belief

RELS

3399

Contemporary Issues

 

 

 

Worship and Spirituality

RELS

1375

Prayer and Spirituality

RELS

2335

U.S. Latino/a Spirituality

RELS

3320

Christian Symbols and Celebrations

RELS

3322

Christianity through Art

RELS

3325

Arts for Christian Worship

RELS

3365

Christian Worship

RELS

4362

Lay Leadership of Public Prayer

RELS

3399

Contemporary Issues

3. RELS 4x49 Field Education (under the direction of UIW RELS faculty) is recommended. One to three

credit hours.

4. 6 semester hours of Philosophy is recommended.

5. Second major or a concentration or minor of 12-18 semester hours

(6 upper division hours) is recommended.

Requirements for a Minor in Religious Studies:

18 semester hours

1. 12 semester hours

Biblical Studies (3 semester hours)

RELS

1345

Biblical Themes, or

RELS

2320

Hebrew Scriptures, or

RELS

2350

Gospels and Acts

 

 

 

Theological Studies (3 semester hours)

RELS

1310

Introduction to Theology, or

RELS

1340

Understanding Catholicism

 

 

 

Christianity and Culture (6 semester hours)

RELS

1360

Christian Ethics

RELS

2345

World Religions

2. 6 additional upper division hours

The general minor in Religious Studies is recommended both for students interested in religious education and/or church ministry, and for those wishing to augment their academic background in the area to support the liberal arts dimension of their chosen professional career (e.g., law, medical, business).

Students who plan to pursue a degree in Religious Studies must formally apply and be admitted as a major as soon as possible upon the completion of 30 semester hours, at least 15 of which must be from the University of the Incarnate Word. To be eligible for admission to the RELS major, a student must have at least a 2.25 cumulative GPA. Without special arrangements, RELS courses taken before 1990 or courses taken at a state institution will not fulfill the 36-hour requirement for a major. Lower division classes are at the 1000 and 2000 levels, and upper division classes are at the 3000 and 4000 levels.

Recommended Sequence of Courses in the Major:

Freshman Year (6 to 9 hours)

RELS

1310

Introduction to Theology or 1340 Understanding Catholicism or RELS 1360 Christian Ethics

RELS

1345

Biblical Themes

Sophomore Year (9 to 12 hours)

RELS

1355

History of Christianity

RELS

1360

Christian Ethics

RELS

2320

Hebrew Scriptures

RELS

2345

World Religions

RELS

2350

Gospels and Acts

RELS

3325

Arts for Christian Worship

Junior Year (9 to 12 hours)

RELS

3310

Pauline Writings

RELS

 

RELS

3322

 

3340

Christianity through Art or 3320 Christian Symbols and Celebration

Feminist Theology

RELS

4320

U.S. Latino/a Theology and Culture

RELS

4345

Theologies of Liberation or 3399 Contemporary Issues

Senior Year (9 to 12 hours)

RELS

3335

God and Human Sexuality

RELS

3350

Environmental Theology and Ethics or 3305 Catholic Social Teachings

RELS

4310

Women in Christian Tradition or 4300 Women and Faith

Students interested in a major or minor in RELS should consult with the Chair of the Department of Religious Studies.

Undergraduate Certificate in Religious Studies:

A certificate in Religious Studies will be awarded to students who complete 18 semester hours of Religious Studies coursework, including 1345, 2320, or 2350 and 3345.

Pastoral Institute

Through the Pastoral Institute, UIW offers undergraduate and graduate programs designed to prepare students for a variety of lay ministries in the church, including religious education at all levels, youth and campus ministry, parish leadership roles, and liturgical ministries.

Undergraduate Certificate in Pastoral Studies

This certificate is awarded on completion of 16 semester hours of study through the Pastoral Institute, distributed over the three areas of Scripture, Theology, and Ministry. Religious Studies courses are also applicable. Courses are selected with reference to the student's previous studies, and educational, personal and ministerial goals. For further information on this program, contact the Director of the Pastoral Institute.

SOCIOLOGY (SOCI)

The mission of the Sociology Department is to provide the major with a strong foundation in sociological theory and research within the context of a modern sociological curriculum. The Department is committed to the development of the "sociological imagination" and the fostering of action based on a progressive social consciousness. The Department is guided by the values of Catholic social doctrine, the mission of the University, and a high regard for scholarly academic work that leads to the enhancement of knowledge.

Sociology is a social science that studies society and the social activity of human beings. Sociologists are interested in discovering and explaining how and why people think, feel, and act the way they do, focusing on groups and categories of people sharing common characteristics. Empirical evidence, derived from scientific investigation, is fundamental to sociological inquiry. Sociological studies include culture, religion, government, economy, education, family, crime, sports, and race relations.

Major Requirements for a Bachelor of Arts:
Plan A: Academic Specialization

36 semester hours as follows:

1. 15 semester hours of required courses:

SOCI

1311

Introduction to Sociology

SOCI

3351

Social Psychology

SOCI

3381

Statistics for Behavioral Sciences

SOCI

3384

Research Methods

SOCI

3387

Sociological Theory

2. 21 additional semester hours in Sociology, at least 12 of which are upper division.

3. A minor in any other field.

Plan B: Professional Specialization

48 semester hours, distributed as follows:

1. 24 semester hours of required courses:

SOCI

1311

Introduction to Sociology

SOCI

3332

Culturology and Cross-Cultural Communication

SOCI

3344

Social Stratification

SOCI

3351

Social Psychology

SOCI

3371

Minority Relations

SOCI

3381

Statistics for Behavioral Sciences

SOCI

3384

Research Methods

SOCI

3387

Sociological Theory

2. One of the following options (6 hours):

SOCI

3355

Aging in America and SOCI 3356 Death in America

SOCI

3322

Crime and Delinquency and SOCI 3323 Criminal Justice

SOCI

3343

The Family and PSYC 2370 Child and Adolescent Development

3. 6 additional hours in Sociology

4. The following 12 hours:

SOCI

4359/4360

Directed Practicum/Internship I, II

BMGT

3340

Management Theory and Practice

BMGT

3354

Human Resource Management

Requirements for a Minor in Sociology:

12 semester hours (6 upper division) in SOCI

Recommended Sequence of Courses in the Major (Plan A):

Freshman Year

SOCI

1311

Introductory Sociology Sophomore Year

Sophomore Year

SOCI

2335

Social Issues Through Cinema or SOCI 2341 Social Institutions

Junior Year

SOCI

3351

Social Psychology

SOCI

3381

Statistics for Behavioral Sciences

SOCI

3384

Research Methods

6 hours of upper division sociology courses

Senior Year (or Junior year as offered)

SOCI

3387

Sociological Theory

12 hours of upper division sociology courses

Recommended Sequence of Courses in the Major (Plan B):

Freshman Year

SOCI

1311

Introductory Sociology

Sophomore Year

SOCI

2335

Social Issues Through Cinema or SOCI 2341 Social Institutions

Junior Year

SOCI

3351

Social Psychology

SOCI

3381

Statistics for Behavioral Sciences

SOCI

3384

Research Methods

BMGT

3340

Management Theory and Practice option (A or B)

Senior Year

SOCI

3387

Sociological Theory (or Junior year as offered)

SOCI

4359

Practicum I

SOCI

4360

Practicum II

BMGT

3340

Management Theory and Practice

12 hours of upper division sociology courses

SPANISH (SPAN)

And other Foreign Languages

The offerings in foreign languages develop language proficiency and cultural awareness through collaborative classes where effective communication is the primary goal. Advanced courses in Spanish contribute to knowledge about the Spanish-speaking world and the history and structure of the Spanish language and its literature. These courses allow students to read and respond in writing to Spanish-language authors in Spanish, since all advanced courses are taught in the language using authentic texts. Students also interact in Spanish to promote language competence approaching that of native speakers.

Major Requirements for a Bachelor of Arts in Spanish

1. 33 semester hours of Spanish courses as follows:

Language requirements (9 hours)

Spanish

2311

Intermediate Spanish I

Spanish

2312

Intermediate Spanish II

Spanish

3301

Advanced Spanish Grammar and Composition

NOTE: The number of hours the students will be required to take to meet this requirement will be determined by a placement test given by the department. As a result of the placement test, any of these language requirements may be waived, but a subsequent waiver does not remove the student from having to fulfill the total 33-hour requirement for the major. Course electives in Spanish should be taken to complete the 33 hours.

Linguistics requirements (6 hours)

Spanish

3321

Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics

Spanish

3322

Spanish Phonetics and Oral Communication

NOTE: In addition to Spanish 3321 and Spanish 3322, candidates for teacher certification must take Spanish 3337, Applied Linguistics for Teaching, for a total of 9 hours to fulfill the Linguistics requirement.

Literature requirements (9 hours)

Spanish

3331

Spanish Literature to 1700

Spanish

3332

Spanish Literature since 1700

Spanish

3335

Children's Literature

Spanish

3341

Spanish-American Literature to Modernism

Spanish

3342

Spanish-American Literature since Modernism

Spanish

3343

Literature of U.S. Hispanics

Culture requirements (6 hours)

Spanish

3311

Culture and Civilization of Spain

Spanish

3312

Culture and Civilization of Latin America

Electives in Spanish to complete the required 33 hours in the major.

2. A minor in any other field, or an approved interdisciplinary minor of 18 semester hours, including 6 upper division hours.

Requirements for a Minor in Spanish:

(A) Spanish Studies Minor: 12 hours of courses above the 1000-level, including at least 6 hours at the upper division level. Courses at the 3000 level and above will be taught entirely in Spanish.

(B) Spanish Proficiency Minor: 21 semester hours in Spanish as follows (courses taught at the 3000 level and above will be taught entirely in Spanish):

1. Required Courses: 18 hours

a) SPAN 1311, Elementary Spanish I

b) SPAN 1312, Elementary Spanish II

c) SPAN 2311, Intermediate Spanish I: Oral Communication

d) SPAN 2312, Intermediate Spanish II: Writing

e) SPAN 3301, Advanced Spanish Grammar and Composition

f) SPAN 3312, Culture and Civilization of Latin America

2. Elective Course: 3 hours

a) Advanced Spanish elective

Credit for SPAN 1311 and SPAN 1312 may be earned through a CLEP exam. Additionally, an instructor may determine that the student's abilities warrant placement at a higher level, through an oral proficiency interview or written placement exam. However, such placement does not constitute credit, and the student is required to take additional courses in advanced Spanish to complete the 21-hour minor.

For information concerning placement in language courses, possible credit by examination, and cooperative arrangements with other universities, students may contact the Foreign Language Advisor.

*Candidates for teacher certification must take 9 hours of linguistics, to include SPAN 3337, Applied Linguistics for Teachers. They must also choose at least one literature course representing Spain and one representing Spanish America. Students should consult the Education Department Supplement on teaching certification.

Additional courses in Spanish and other foreign languages will be offered as need arises.

SPEECH COMMUNICATION (SPCH)

Courses in Speech serve to meet important objectives for a liberal arts curriculum: to develop critical thinking, to enhance aesthetic sensitivity, to communicate with clarity, precision, and conviction. Communication Arts offers a fourth track specialization in Speech Communication.

Requirements for a Minor in Speech

SPCH 2321, 3371, 3391, 4371, and any other course in the department.

Note: SPCH 1311 Public Speaking is not a prerequisite for SPCH 2321 but is a prerequisite for the other requirements of the Minor.

THEATRE ARTS (THAR)

The Mission of the Theatre Arts Department focuses on three main goals: to provide our majors with a strong, basic foundation in the performing arts that will enable them to pursue post-graduate educational and professional opportunities in Theatre, to enhance the general education of the University's CORE curriculum, and to enrich the cultural, spiritual, and intellectual lives of our on-campus and San Antonio communities.

The Theatre Arts Department provides its majors with a liberal arts program of study leading to a Bachelor of Arts in Theatre. This program affords its graduates a thorough understanding of the art form: its performance conditions, representative dramatic literature and its major practices - past and present. Through the study of Theatre Arts, UIW students have the opportunity to learn analytic methods that enable them to think critically and to become creative problem solvers, thereby assisting in their preparation for advanced professional study in a variety of fields that respect a well-balanced liberal arts degree. Upon completion of their degree, UIW graduates are prepared to undertake specialized training in a variety of graduate Theatre Arts study areas. The exceptionally talented graduate will have sufficient education and training to begin a career in professional theatre, on or off stage.

The Department views its production season as both an extension of its educational program and a site of artistic and intellectual expression. In its presentation of four to five theatrical productions each year, the Theatre Arts faculty commits itself to collaborative teaching in order to support diversity of approaches and techniques as well as to demonstrate integrated artistic cooperation. The Department adheres to a policy of equal opportunity in casting and in the assignment of production responsibilities. Participation in the academic year production season is open to any student enrolled in UIW, and required of Theatre Arts majors. Through the production season, we provide the opportunity to participate and to witness major dramatic genres and theatrical styles.

The Theatre Arts program holds accreditation by the National Association of Schools of Theatre.

Major Requirements for a Bachelor of Arts in Theatre Arts:

1a. 33 semester hours in required Theatre Arts courses including 12-15 upper division hours

THAR

1191

Theatre Practicum

THAR

1321

Beginning Acting

THAR

1322

Intermediate Acting

THAR

1380

Introduction to Theatre

THAR

2192

Theatre Practicum

THAR

2193

Theatre Practicum

THAR

2360

Introduction to Technical Production

THAR

2361

Introduction to Theatre Design

THAR

3381

The Development of Drama and Theatre I

THAR

3382

The Development of Drama and Theatre II

THAR

4331

Fundamentals of Directing

THAR

4333

Senior Studio (capstone course)

1b. 3 Additional hours in Theatre Arts Practicum or Advanced Theatre Arts Practicum Courses

2. An additional 14 semester hours in elective Theatre Arts courses, including 9 upper division semester hours, to be selected from one or more of the following areas:

Performance:

THAR

2324

Stage Movement

THAR

2325

Theatre Voice and Speech Studies

THAR

3304

Children's Theatre

THAR

3323

Acting in Verse

THAR

3324

Selected Topics in Performance (may be repeated for credit)

THAR

3326

Advanced Acting

THAR

4303

Creative Dramatics

Design/Tech:

THAR

2242

Basic Stage Make-up

THAR

3344

Costume Construction

THAR

3341

Costume Design

THAR

3362

Scene Design

THAR

3363

Light Design

THAR

4342

Costume History (cross-list with FMGT)

General Studies:

THAR

1381

Theatre Appreciation (Non Majors)

THAR

1320

Acting in Everyday Life (Non Majors)

THAR

2380

Play Analysis

 

 

 

THAR

4301

Creativity in the Arts

THAR

4383

Dramatic Theory and Criticism

THAR

4387

American Theatre (cross list with ENGL)

THAR

4385

Shakespeare (cross list with ENGL)

THAR

4393

Reading and Research in Theatre Arts

THAR

4399

Selected Topics in Theatre Arts

Requirement for a Minor in Theatre Arts:

18 hours as follows (including 6 upper division hours):

THAR

1321

Beginning Acting

THAR

2360

Introduction to Technical Production

One course selected from the following:

THAR

2380

Play Analysis

THAR

3381

The Development of Drama and Theatre I

THAR

3382

The Development of Drama and Theatre II

Additional 9 hours in elective THAR courses

Recommended Sequence of Courses in the Major:

Freshman Year

THAR

1191

Theatre Practicum

THAR

1321

Beginning Acting

THAR

1380

Introduction to Theatre

THAR

2360

Introduction to Technical Production

THAR

2361

Introduction to Theatre Design

Sophomore Year

THAR

1322

Intermediate Acting

THAR

2192

Theatre Practicum

THAR

2193

Theatre Practicum

THAR

3381

The Development of Drama and Theatre I (Sophomore or Junior Year)

THAR

3382

The Development of Drama and Theatre II (Sophomore or Junior Year)

Junior Year

THAR

2193

Theatre Practicum (repeat) or THAR 3194 Advanced Theatre Practicum

THAR

2193

Theatre Practicum (repeat) or THAR 3195 Advanced Theatre Practicum

THAR

4331

Fundamentals of Directing

Senior Year

THAR

4196

Advanced Theatre Practicum

THAR

4333

Senior Studio