Undergraduate Catalog 2005-07

VII. DESCRIPTION OF COURSES

Course Numbers
ACADEMIC LITERACY MATHEMATICS (ALMA)
ACADEMIC LITERACY RHETORIC (ALRH)
ANTHROPOLOGY (ANTH)
ART (ARTS)
ART HISTORY (ARTH)
ATHLETIC TRAINING AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION (PEHP)
BIOLOGY (BIOL)
BUSINESS: ACCOUNTING (ACCT)
BUSINESS: BANKING AND FINANCE (BFIN)
BUSINESS: BUSINESS LAW (BLAW)
BUSINESS: INFORMATION SYSTEMS (BINF)
BUSINESS: INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS (BINT)
BUSINESS: MANAGEMENT (BMGT)
BUSINESS MANAGEMENT DECISION SCIENCES (BMDS)
BUSINESS: MARKETING (BMKT)
CHEMISTRY (CHEM)
COMMUNICATION ARTS (COMM)
COMPUTER GRAPHIC ARTS (CART)
COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS (CIS)
COMPUTER LITERACY (COMP)
CULTURAL STUDIES (CLST)
DANCE (DANC)
DIMENSIONS OF WELLNESS (DWHP)
EARTH SCIENCE (EASC)
EDUCATION (EDUC)
ENGINEERING (ENGR)
ENGLISH (ENGL)
ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE (ENSC)
FASHION MANAGEMENT (FMGT)
FASHION MERCHANDISING (FMER)
FOREIGN LANGUAGES
GEOGRAPHY (GEOG)
GEOLOGY (GEOL)
HISTORY (HIST)
INTERIOR ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN (INTD)
MATHEMATICS (MATH)
MUSIC, APPLIED PRIVATE (MUAP)
MUSI AND ENSEMBLE (MUSI)
MUSIC INDUSTRY STUDIES (MUST)
MUSIC THERAPY (MUTH)
NUCLEAR MEDICINE (NMED)
NURSING (NURS)
NUTRITION (NUTR)
PHILOSOPHY (PHIL)
PHYSICAL EDUCATION (PEHP)
PHYSICS (PHYS)
POLITICAL SCIENCE (POLS)
PSYCHOLOGY (PSYC)
RELIGIOUS STUDIES (RELS)
SOCIOLOGY (SOCI)
SPANISH (SPAN)
SPEECH (SPCH)
SPORT MANAGEMENT (SMHP)
THEATRE ARTS (THAR)

Course Numbers
Courses are designated by numbers that indicate their rank. Those numbered from 1000 to 1999 inclusive are of freshman rank; courses from 2000 to 2999 inclusive are of sophomore rank but may also be taken by freshmen that present the equivalent of the prerequisite at entrance; courses numbered from 3000 to 4999 are of junior and senior rank. The first digit of the course number indicates the class level of the course. The second digit indicates the semester hour value of the course. Prerequisites refer to current course numbering. For the prior course number, please see an advisor. Special Topics and Selected Topics courses (usually numbered 4371 and 4399) may be offered in any discipline and are repeatable when and as the topics change. Independent Study courses numbered 4X98 with the X meaning a specific credit hour value. These courses are available in all disciplines subject to eligibility requirements stated in Section V of this Bulletin.

NOTE: Some courses may have separate fees assessed at registration. Please refer to the Schedule of Classes for further information.


ACADEMIC LITERACY MATHEMATICS (ALMA)

0318 Math I
A review of math topics from Algebra I: prime and composite numbers, integers, rational numbers, exponents, solving equations, ratio and proportion, and problem solving. Must be completed with a minimum grade of C. (Fall, Spring)

0319 Math II
A review of math topics from Algebra II: polynomials, factoring, algebraic fractions, graphing, roots and radicals, and quadratic equations. Prerequisite: ALMA 0318 or satisfactory placement test score. Must be completed with a minimum grade of C. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

ACADEMIC LITERACY RHETORIC (ALRH)

0312 Rhetoric
Study in the principles of critical reading and critical writing for the university community. Emphasis is on effective essay composition as a reader-based process, strategic patterns of development for paragraphs and essays, content organization, effective grammar, and syntax. ALHR 0312 satisfies students’ Academic Literacy Reading and /or Writing requirements. Must be completed with a minimum “C” grade, and a passing grade on the course exit examination. No pre-requisites required. [3 hours of University credit]

ANTHROPOLOGY (ANTH)
[Program Description page 90]

1311 Cultural Anthropology
This course studies dynamics of human cultures, including material culture, technology, language, kinship and social organization, religion, art, and other major aspects of culture in diverse societies. (Fall)

1312 Archaeology and Physical Anthropology
This course studies prehistoric people; methods and techniques used by archaeologists to reconstruct prehistoric cultures; changing adaptations to paleoenvironments and the bases of contemporary cultural and physical variations. (Spring)

2324 Native Peoples of North America
This is a survey of Native American peoples north of Mexico, their archaeological evidence, cultural traditions, and relationships to non-native peoples from the earliest peopling of North America to the present. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective. (Spring, odd years)

2341 Health and Humanity
This course studies popular concepts of health, sickness, curing, pregnancy and birth, epidemiology, health practitioners, and medicines in widely different societies. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective. (As required)

3232 Culturology and Cross-Cultural Communication
This course examines the importance of culture and its role in communication. Cross-referenced with SOCI 3332. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective. (As required)

3326 Contemporary Problems in Developing Nations
This course explores different models of social, economic and political development and change, and their impact on the lives of people in developing nations, with an emphasis on peasant and rural communities in Latin America. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective. (Fall, odd years)

3327 Managing Cultural Differences
This course examines issues of doing business, working, and living in a culture different from one’s own or in multicultural contexts. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective. (Spring, even years)

3333 Prehistoric North America
This is a survey of prehistoric peoples in North America prior to the arrival of Europeans. Organized by the cultural regions, such as the U.S. Southwest, the Great Plains, and the Sub-Arctic. Lifestyles are reconstructed based upon archeological research. (Fall, even years)

3334 Ancient Civilizations of the Americas
This course studies the rise and fall of the major prehistoric civilizations of Central and South America, with emphasis on the Olmec, Maya, Toltec, Axtec and Inca. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective. (Spring, even years)

3363 Native American Art: Pueblo, Moundbuilders, Archaic
See ARTH 3363.

3364 Native American Art: Plains, Athapaskan, and Pacific Coast
See ARTH 3364.

4355, 4655 Museum Internship
Variety of working museum experiences under the guidance of museum staff member and faculty advisor. Prerequisites: ANTH 1311, 1312, 2324, 3363, or 3364, 4371, and Senior standing. (As required)

4371 Laboratory Techniques in Archaeology
This course presents basic archaeological laboratory procedures, including artifact processing, taxonomy, photography, illustration, library research, and curatorial techniques. (Fall, even years)

ART (ARTS)
[Program Description, page 90]

1301 Drawing I
Students will draw the human model in action and repose in various media. 5 studio hours a week plus outside assignments. Fee. (Fall, Spring,Summer)

1311 Design I
In this course students will examine Elements of 2-D design, including the elements of art and the principles of organization, and practice in their use. Course meets for 5 studio hours a week. Fee. (Fall, Spring)

2301 Drawing II
Continuation of ARTS 1301. 5 studio hours a week plus outside assignments. Fee. Prerequisite: ARTS 1311. (Fall)

2311 Design II
In this course students will examine Elements of 3-D design, including the ideas, materials and techniques related to sculpture, and practice in their use. Course meets for 5 studio hours a week. Fee. (Spring)
2312 Introduction to Theatre Design
See THAR 2361.

2320 Painting I
This studio course investigates the
potential of painting media for descriptive and expressive possibilities. Emphasis will be placed on the development of fundamental techniques, color theory, composition and the promotion of critical thinking skills. 5 studio hours a week. Fee. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

2342 Ceramics I
In this course, students apply design in the ceramic medium and learn basic ceramic skills such as hand building, glazing, and the rudiments of wheel throwing. 5 studio hours a week. Fee. (Fall, Spring)

2357 Photography
In this course, students apply the principles of design in black and white photography. Instruction in the use of camera and darkroom equipment. Fee. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

2361 Sculpture I
Students will learn basic sculptural techniques, concepts, and materials such as model making, plaster casting, carving, and wax casting. Students will also be introduced to the
rudiments of welding. 5 studio hours a week. Fee. (Fall, Spring)

3301 Advanced Drawing
Continuation of ARTS 2301 with more emphasis on individual specialization. 5 studio hours a week. May be repeated for credit. Fee. Prerequisite: ARTS 2301. (Fall, Spring)

3321 Painting II
Continuation of Painting I. 5 studio hours a week. May be repeated for credit. Fee. Prerequisite: ARTS 2320. (Fall, Spring)

3331 Ceramic Sculpture
This course allows students to study creative exploration of the clay sculpture techniques of coil, solid cutaway, slab and casting. 5 studio hours a week. It may be repeated for credit. Fee. Prerequisites: ARTS 1301, 1311, 2301, 2311 or permission of instructor. (as needed)

3342 Ceramics II
This course places special emphasis on advanced building techniques, more complex throwing problems, advanced glazing
techniques, and reduction firing of glazes using a gas kiln as well as electric kilns. 5 studio hours a week. Fee. Prerequisite: ARTS 2342 or permission of the instructor. (Fall, Spring)

3344 Ceramics III
This course introduces students to more challenging aesthetic and decorative situations. The student will be encouraged to begin to develop a unique style, working with the instructor to learn the advanced skills needed to accomplish this. 5 studio hours a week. Fee. Prerequisite: ARTS 3342. (As needed)

3351 Printmaking I

3352 Printmaking II
Continuation of ARTS 3351. 5 studio hours a week. May be repeated for credit. Fee. Prerequisite: ARTS 3351. (Spring)

3355 Native Crafts
Craft techniques of the American Indian and other close-to-the-land cultures, including Native Clay and Spinning, Dyeing, and Weaving. 5 studio hours and three research hours a week. May be repeated for credit. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective. Fee. (As needed)

3358 Digital Photography
Digital photography is a process for creating images using the controlled reaction of light
and a photoelectric microchip followed by computer manipulation. This is a studio art/graphic production course providing the student an opportunity to explore the contemporary uses of digital photography in artistic and graphic design production. Five studio hours a week. Fee. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective. (Summer, Fall)

3360 Art Photography: Documentary Photography
In this course students study and create photographs within the context of straight, black and white documentary photography. Included in the course are a consideration of the difficulty of photographing objectively, a study of image and text to create a document, and an investigation of the personal document. Five studio hours a week. Fee. Prerequisite: ARTS 2357. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective. (Fall, even numbered years)

3361 Sculpture II
Students will expand on an accumulated base of sculptural and other artistic techniques through additional training in welding, woodworking, casting, and other complex sculptural methods and styles. Five studio hours a week. Fee. Prerequisite: ARTS 2361 (Fall, Spring)

3362 Sculpture III
This course provides concentrated studio study with an emphasis on the pursuit and development of a strong, personal aesthetic statement and an individual approach to the use of the medium, including experimentation in multiple processes. Five studio hours a week. Fee. Prerequisite: ARTS 3361 (As needed)

3365 Art Photography: Directorial Photography
In this course students study and create photographs within the context of directorial photography. The Directorial Mode in photography is that photographic approach in which the photographer acts as director to create an image that is not found ready-made in the real world. Included in the course are a consideration of the history of the Directorial Mode and a creation of directorial images. These include still life, posed portraits, photographic assemblage/construction, and tableaux. Five studio hours a week. Fee. Prerequisite: ARTS 2357. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective. (Fall, odd numbered years)

3381 Creative Development in Art
This course studies creative art activities, materials, guidance, and motivation applicable to children’s art. (As needed)

3382 Group Studio Management
In this course, students learn techniques, organization, materials, equipment, and
guidance applicable to the management of adolescent and adult group studios. (As needed)

3383 Community Art Programs for Children
This course is an internship in community art programs. Prerequisites: ARTS 3381 and Senior standing as an Art major as well as permission of instructor. (As needed)

3384 Community Art Programs for Adolescents and Adults
This course is an internship in community art programs. Prerequisites: ARTS 3382 and Senior standing as an Art major as well as permission of instructor. (As needed)

3390 Junior Studio
In this course students will create a portfolio in a single discipline. Students will work individually with the instructor to identify their discipline concentration and determine the number of works to be made. Class time will consist of individual critiques of the work being made. Fee. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing as an art major. (As needed)

4355/4655 Museology
Students experience working in
museums under the guidance of a museum staff member and a faculty advisor. Six hours per week. (Museology may be taken for a total of six semester hours either as 4655 or taken twice as 4355). Prerequisites: Senior standing as an Art major with a minimum of 9 semester hours in Art History and permission of the Chair of the Art Department. (Fall, Spring)

4360 Art Photography: Manipulated Images
In this course students study and create photographs altered by hand manipulation. This course will consider the history of manipulated images and the application of diverse techniques, including toning, selective toning, hand coloring, altering/scratching the negative, sequence composites, and cyanotypes. 5 studio hours a week. Fee. Prerequisite: ARTS 2357. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective. (As needed)

4388 Internship in Photography
In this course students will acquire hands-on knowledge of professional photographic practices through internship with a professional photographer. Classes will take place at a photographic studio. Skills in the following topics will be refined: lighting, studio management, processing, printing, and digital photography. Six hours per week. Prerequisites: ARTS 1311, ARTS 2357, ARTS 3358, ARTH 3357, ARTS 3360 or 3365, and permission of the Chair of the Art Department. (Fall, Spring)

4389 Internship in Art in the Non-Profit Sector
In this course students will acquire hands on knowledge of professional practices in the art sector through internship with an arts
professional at a non-profit arts institution under the guidance of a faculty advisor. This course will provide training in the following areas: non-profit funding, budgets, and grants writing; arts marketing and PR; curatorial practices, programming and program assessment; exhibition planning, installation, and labeling. Six hours per week. Prerequisites: ARTH 2361, ARTH 2362, and Senior standing as an art major as well as permission of the Chair of the Art Department. (Fall, Spring)

4390 Senior Capstone
In this course students study and critique exhibitions, examining the idea of the individual object, the object in series and in sequence. Reading and writing about contemporary art, as well as participation in the art world through practical application is required. The culmination of this course will be the students’ creation, installation, exhibition and critique of their own artwork. Fee. Prerequisite: ARTS 3390. (As needed)

ART HISTORY (ARTH)
[Program Description, page 90]

1310 Masterworks of World Art
This is a one-semester survey of Western and non-Western art: painting, sculpture, architecture, etc. This course will explore art from the earliest civilizations (Egyptian, Greek and Roman), from the late medieval period (Romanesque and Gothic), from Mesoamerican (1500 B.C. to 1520 A.D.), from the Renaissance (Da Vinci, Michelangelo), and from the modern and post-modern eras of the U.S. and Latin America. The organization is not strictly chronological. Rather, each unit consists of several recurring topics: introduction, place; style or movement; individual artist and status of the artist; patronage and politics; individual work of art. This structure will introduce students to approaching works of art in context. This course is designed for non-Art majors and may not be taken by Art majors for credit. (Fall, Spring)


2361 Art History: Ancient Through Medieval
This is a representative survey of the visual arts from the earliest civilizations in the Middle East and Europe to the late medieval period preceding the Renaissance. The historical context of the civilizations that produced these images will also be discussed. Students should obtain an understanding of the formal, intellectual, and spiritual values of these early monuments that constitute a fundamental part of our cultural heritage. (Fall)

2362 Art History: Renaissance to Modern
This is a survey of Western art from the early Renaissance to the twentieth century. It considers the formal, intellectual, and spiritual values within Western art during the last seven centuries. Discussions will also focus upon the historical and social contexts underlying the creative process in Western civilization. Prerequisite: ARTH 2361. (Spring)

3350 Latin American Art: 20th Century
This course explores the art of the modern era (1820 to 1980) in the Caribbean and South America. This course considers the establishment of the art academies in Latin America during the latter part of the 19th Century and the shift away from academic painting in the 1920s. This course will also analyze the change in the 1930s to indigenism and social subjects; abstraction; surrealism; Indo-Americanism and Afro-Caribbean identity in the 1940s; concrete-opticalkinetic movements in the 1950s and 1960s, and Latin American women artists of the 1970s and 1980s. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective. Prerequisite: ARTH 2361 and 2362. (As needed)

3357 History of Photography
In this course students will learn the history of photography from the time before the invention of photography, when the camera obscura was in use, to the present. Both the technological advances and the changing aesthetics of the medium will be considered. (Spring, even numbered years)

3360 Survey in Contemporary Art
This is a survey of contemporary art from Impressionism to the present through an examination of the ways in which artists have interpreted or responded to the world and the human condition. This course takes into consideration the kinds of physical, psychological, cultural and temporal realities that are recognized and/or constructed by modern artists. Prerequisite: ARTH 2362 May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective. (As needed)

3363 Native American Art: Pueblo, Moundbuilders, and Archaic
This course studies the art of the indigenous Archaic, Moundbuilder, Southeast, and Pueblo people of North America from Pre-European through the Historic Era. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective. (Fall)

3364 Native American Art: Plains, Athapaskan, Pacific Coast
This course studies the art of the North American Athapaskan, Plains, Northwest Coast, California, and Far North peoples. May be taken as a Cultural Study elective. (Spring)

3375 Aesthetics: Philosophy of Art and Beauty
This course is a philosophical examination of the world and nature of art and the nature and
significance of aesthetic experience. Topics may include the definition of art, the idea of beauty, aesthetic value and experience, the nature of the creative process, form versus content, expressiveness, symbolism, the role of theory in aesthetics, art criticism, art and religion, art and morality, art and science, and art and the community. Prerequisite: PHIL 1381. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective. Cross reference with PHIL 3375. (Spring or as needed)

4350 Modern Art of Mexico
This course will cover the modern art of Mexico beginning with the Mexican Academy (post Independence) to 20th Century art of the 1980s including the art of Rocio Maldonado, Julio Galan, and Nahum Zenil. The course considers the shift away from academic painting in the 1920s when artists (and writers) sought to modernize their cultural image, the change in the 1930s to social subjects especially during the muralist movement, the alternative ideology of Tamayo, surrealism in the 1940s, the
architecture of the 1950s, the group “nueva
presencia,” neofiguration, and finally the art of the 1980s in which identity and sexuality play a role. Prerequisite: ARTH 2361 and 2362. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective. (As needed)

4360 Issues in Contemporary Art
This is a study of contemporary art from 1940 to the present through an examination of major developments in architecture, painting, and sculpture. This course takes into consideration the breakdown of formal boundaries among media and between the arts following the onset of modernism and the implications of the economic, political, and cultural shifts in power in Europe and the United States. Prerequisite: ARTH 2362. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective. (Fall)

ATHLETIC TRAINING AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION (PEHP)
[See PHYSICAL EDUCATION (PEHP), page 192]

1170 Athletic Training Clinical Experiences I
This course is designed to challenge students through the use of competency-based modules and supervised clinical field experiences that will review, enhance, and polish the knowledge and skills taught in ATHP 1310. Prerequisite: ATHP 1310 and Admission into Athletic Training Education Program. (Fall)

1310 Introduction to Athletic Training
This course is designed to introduce the
student to the profession of athletic training by reviewing its’ history and defining the roles and responsibilities of the athletic trainer. Particular emphasis is placed upon the prevention of injuries to athletes and physically active individuals in the areas of conditioning, protective equipment fitting, pre-participation screening, and environmental risk factor control. The student will also become familiar with common medical and human anatomical terminology and injury mechanisms. (Spring)

2170 Athletic Training Clinical Experiences II
This course is designed to challenge students through the use of competency-based modules and supervised clinical field experiences that will review, enhance, and polish the knowledge and skills taught in ATHP 2301, 2310, and 2341 will be reviewed, polished, and related to actual clinical applications. Prerequisite: ATHP 2301, 2310 and 2341. (Spring)

2301 Emergency and Medical Aspects in Athletic Training
This course includes an in-depth investigation of emergency and medical aspects needed by the professional during the initial phases of physical injury and disease. This course offers an emphasis on the first aid and pre-hospital care of an injured individual. The primary focus will
be injuries and conditions that occur from participation by a physically active population. Prerequisite: ATHP 1310 and Admission into Athletic Training Education Program. (Fall)


2305 Functional Anatomy and Muscle Testing
This course includes an in-depth advanced review of anatomical and physiological processes needed by the professional to understand underlying tissues and movements from the standpoint of physical injury, assessment and rehabilitation. This course offers a detailed review of each body segment related to athletes and the physically active; skeletal framework, articulation, musculature, innervation, and how each affects body position and movement during activity. Prerequisite: ATHP 1310 and Admission into Athletic Training Education Program. (Fall)

2310 Orthopedic Injuries and Athletic Conditions
This course includes an in-depth look at injuries and conditions as they relate to the systems of the human body. Areas to be covered include the mechanism, clinical signs and symptoms, and common treatment and care. Course will also provide student with a foundation in tissue healing following an injury. Prerequisite: ATHP 1310 and Admission into Athletic Training Education Program. (Fall)

2315 Evaluation of Injuries and Conditions to the Trunk and Lower Extremities
This course includes an in-depth inquiry into the anatomical and physiological process associated with the occurrence of injuries to athletes and physically active individuals. By recognizing the signs and symptoms and then interpreting results of special tests, the student will develop techniques and methods with which to accurately evaluate and determine the extent of the injury sustained. This course focuses on the evaluation process for injuries and conditions to the thorax, abdomen, lumbar spine, hip and lower extremities. Prerequisite: ATHP 2305 and 2310. (Spring)

 

2320 Evaluation of Injuries and Conditions to the Head, Neck and Upper Extremities
This course includes an in-depth inquiry into the anatomical and physiological process associated with the occurrence of injuries to athletes and physically active individuals. By recognizing the signs and symptoms and then interpreting results of special tests, the student will develop techniques and methods with which to accurately evaluate and determine the extent of the injury sustained. This course focuses on the evaluation process for injuries and conditions to the head, face, cervical spine, and upper extremities. Prerequisite: ATHP 2305 and 2310. (Fall)

2341 Pharmacological Issues in Athletic Training
This course covers the general principles of pharmacology as it relates to the athletic and physically active population. Course will discuss use, misuse and abuse of social drugs, ergogenic aids, prescription medications, and over-the-counter drugs in athletic and physically active populations. Prerequisite: ATHP 1310 and Admission into Athletic Training Education Program (Fall)

3170 Athletic Training Clinical Experiences III
This course is designed to challenge students through the use of competency-based modules and supervised clinical field experiences that will review, enhance, and polish the knowledge and skills taught in ATHP 2315, 3310 and 3340 will be reviewed, polished, and related to actual clinical applications. Prerequisite: ATHP 2315, 3310 and 3340. (Fall)

3310 Pathology of Body Systems
This course covers the pathophysiology of prominent acute and chronic diseases of the major body systems. Students study the interdependency of body systems and the conditions that affect human health and well-being. Other topics include common risk factors associated with these conditions, as well as their response to, and impact on, physical activity. Prerequisites: ATHP 2310 (Spring).

3320/3120 Therapeutic Modalities with Lab
This course focuses on the theory, principles, and physiological effects of various therapeutic modalities used in the treatment of orthopedic injuries and athletic conditions. The indications, contraindications, and operational protocols of electrical stimulating currents, infrared modalities, ultrasound, short-wave and microwave diathermy, ultraviolet therapy,
traction, intermittent compression devices and therapeutic massage will be addressed. Laboratory experiences will be used to
supplement classroom instruction. Prerequisites: ATHP 2310 (Fall).

3330/3130 Therapeutic Rehabilitation with Lab
This course focuses on the theory and operation of various contemporary methods of therapeutic exercise in the rehabilitation of orthopedic injuries and athletic conditions. Students will be introduced to manual and mechanical testing and other primary components of a rehabilitation plan, to include determining therapeutic goals, progress, and the criteria to return to athletic participation. Prerequisites: ATHP 2310 (Spring).

3340 Organization and Administration of Athletic Training
This course addresses the organizational and administrative aspects of athletic training program management for various employment settings. Course topics include athletic health care administration and guidelines, human resource management, legal and ethical issues, financial and fiscal management, facility design, information management, professional development, and promotion of the athletic training profession. Prerequisites: ATHP 1310 and Admission into Athletic Training Education Program. (Spring)

4170 Athletic Training Clinical Experiences IV
This course is designed to challenge students through the use of competency-based modules and supervised clinical field experiences that will review, enhance, and polish the knowledge and skills taught in ATHP 2315, 2320, 3320 and 3120 will be reviewed, polished, and related to actual clinical applications. Prerequisite: ATHP 2315, 2320, 3320 and 3120. (Spring)

4190 Athletic Training Clinical Experiences V
This course is designed to challenge students through the use of competency-based modules and supervised clinical field experiences that will review, enhance, and polish the knowledge and skills taught in ATHP 3330 and 3130 will be reviewed, polished, and related to actual clinical applications. Prerequisite: ATHP 3330 and 3130. (Fall)

4388 Internship
This course will introduce the student to various administrative tasks and skills the athletic trainer is faced with on a daily basis. The student will meet with professionals in the athletic training field under various off-campus situations and will discuss various athletic training philosophies and begin to gain experiences that allow them to exhibit entry-level behaviors and to develop consistent characteristics. Prerequisites: ATHP 4190 (Fall, Spring, Summer).

4390 Capstone: Mock Testing
This course will provide the student with an additional method of preparing for the National Board of Certification examination and/or the Texas licensure examination. The course material will be composed of material that has been covered in the previous athletic training courses. A series of worksheets pertaining to competency based modules and research topics will be covered as a cumulative review of previous classes. Prerequisites: ATHP 4190. (Spring)

BIOLOGY (BIOL)
[Program Description, page 170]

1401 Diversity of Life and Laboratory
This course studies the diversity of living organisms, structure and function of plants and animals, ecology, and evolution. It provides a foundation for advanced courses in Biology, but also serves as the science core requirement. Fee. (Fall, Spring)

1402 Unity of Life and Laboratory
This course studies the characteristics of living organisms, cell theory, metabolism, and genetics. A foundation for advanced courses in Biology and is required of Biology majors. Prerequisites: CHEM 1301, 1101. Fee. (Fall, Spring)

2121 and 2122 Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory I and II
This course serves to clarify material from the corresponding lectures. Fee. (Fall, Spring)

2321 and 2322 Anatomy and Physiology I and II
These courses examine the gross structure and functions of the human organism. They are designed for students in the health professions, Biology, and physical education. (Fall, Spring)

2431 Human Physiology for Pharmacy Practice
This course examines the functions of the human organism. It is designed for students enrolled in the Pre-Pharmacy Program. Lecture and Laboratory. Fee.

2474 Introductory Microbiology and Laboratory
This course is designed for majors in Nursing. It describes microorganisms, their characteristics, isolation, growth, and application to public health, foods, and industry. Prerequisite: CHEM 1401. Fee. (Fall, Spring)

3410 Soil Conservation
Soil Conservation involves the study of social, environmental, and economic value of soil, and the processes related to soil degradation. This course includes an examination of the basic principles of soil conservation and associated use of best management practices, and a study of the technological advances that can be utilized to keep our soil resources sustainable. Lecture and Laboratory. Fee.

3411 Molecular Biology of the Cell and Laboratory
This course describes the structure and function of animal and plant cells, with emphasis on molecular biology. Prerequisites: BIOL 1402, CHEM 1302. Fee. (Fall, Spring)

3430 Structure and Function of Animals and Laboratory
This course studies the functional anatomy and physiological processes in animals by
comparing different animal groups, evolutionary history of animals’ phyla, structural adaptations of animals, and the relationship of these modifications to different habitat and environmental conditions. Prerequisite: BIOL 1402, CHEM 1302 or permission of the instructor. Fee. (Fall)


3442 Ecology and Laboratory
This course studies the biological and physical environments, and the dynamic relationships of populations and communities. Prerequisite: Admission to the Biology Major or permission of the instructor. Fee. (Fall)

3445 Genetics and Laboratory
This course studies the principles of heredity and their application to model systems and biotechnology. Student-directed activities include case studies analysis, laboratory and inquiry studies, and a research paper. Prerequisite: BIOL 1402,CHEM 1302 or permission of the instructor. Fee. (Fall, spring)

3450 Histology and Laboratory
This is a study of cells and tissues through microscopic analysis. It relates structure and function of major animal tissues, and utilizes methods for the preservation and examination of tissues. Prerequisite: BIOL 1402, CHEM 1302 or permission of the instructor. Fee.

3461 Genetics and Laboratory
This course studies the principles of heredity and their application to model systems and biotechnology. Student-directed activities include case studies analysis, laboratory and inquiry studies, and a research paper. Prerequisites: BIOL 1402, CHEM 1302 or permission of the instructor. Fee

3471 General Microbiology and Laboratory
This course is designed for biology and nutrition majors. The principles of morphology, taxonomy, metabolism, and molecular biology of microbial cells and viruses will be presented. Prerequisite: BIOL 1402, CHEM 1302. Fee. (Spring)

4380 Virology
This course presents the structure, replication, and properties of viruses. Interactions of viruses with the immune system, vaccination and chemotherapy for prevention and
treatment of viral diseases will be discussed. Prerequisite: BIOL 3471

4415 Geographic Information Systems in Biology
Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in Biology is a computer assemblage that has the capability to create a comprehensive database with many layers of information. The assemblage provides visualization of spatial patterns by cross-referencing different layers of information. This course will concentrate on GIS applications in Biology. Prerequisite: BIOL 1402, CHEM 1302 or permission of the instructor. Cross-listed with ENSC 4415. Fee.

4420 Vertebrate Zoology and Laboratory
This course studies the evolutionary history and patterns of distribution of vertebrates and their structural and behavioral adaptations. Prerequisite: BIOL 1402, CHEM 1302 or permission of the instructor. Fee. (Spring,
even-numbered years).

4344 Evolution and Systematics
This course examines classification principles, evolutionary patterns, mechanisms, and processes for change over time of plants and
animals. Prerequisite: BIOL 1402, CHEM 1302 or permission of the instructor. Fee. (Spring)

4450 Entomology and Laboratory
This broad survey of sub disciplines within entomology covers beneficial and harmful aspects of insects, including production of silk and honey, agricultural pests, household and structural pests, and those insects that are of medical and veterinary importance because they transmit diseases; and toxicology of insecticides and pest management by biological control. Students collect, pin, and identify insects in the laboratory. BIOL 1402, CHEM 1302 or permission of the instructor. Fee. (Fall)

4451 Biochemistry and Laboratory
This course studies the structure and function of biologically significant molecules, enzymology, intermediary metabolism, biosynthesis of macromolecules, bioenergetics, and molecular biology. Cross-referenced as CHEM 4351. Biology majors must register for 4451. May be approved for graduate credit. Prerequisite: BIOL 1402, CHEM 1302, at least one semester of Organic Chemistry, or permission of the instructor. Fee. (Fall)

4460 Research in Water Quality
Applied biological and hydrological studies of the stream and associated flood plain environment including plant and macro-invertebrate survey, stream flow analysis, water chemistry and applications of Geographic Information systems (GIS) for accurate mapping and detailed field data recording. Evaluation of current and
potential point and non-point sources of water pollution and introduction into environmental impact analysis. Prerequisites: Senior level Biology, Chemistry, Environmental Science majors. Other students who wish to enroll in the course must have permission from the instructor, and have completed at least 18 credit hours of introductory and advance course work in Biology, or Chemistry, or Geology. Fee. (Fall)

4472 Immunology and Laboratory
This course presents the immune response, nature of antibodies and antigens and humoral and cellular immune responses. May be approved for graduate credit. Prerequisite: BIOL 1402, CHEM 1302, BIOL 3471 is recommended. Fee. (Spring, odd numbered years)

4482 Aquatic Biology and Laboratory
This course provides field-based investigations of the freshwater habitat and its flora and fauna. Ponds, lakes and streams are characterized. Extensive fieldwork is required. May be approved for graduate credit. Prerequisite: BIOL 1402, CHEM 1302 or permission of the instructor. Fee. (Spring, even-numbered years)

4490 Texas Flora and Laboratory
This course and laboratory explore the structure and taxonomy of plants common to South Texas. Laboratory and fieldwork activities examine the characteristics and classification of trees, shrubs, and flowers. Prerequisite: BIOL 1402, CHEM 1302 or permission of the instructor. Fee. (Spring, odd-numbered years).

4498 Independent Studies in Molecular, Cellular or Organismal Biology
Offered on an “as needed” basis. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Fee.

4499 Selected Topics
Offered on an “as needed” basis. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Fee

BUSINESS: ACCOUNTING (ACCT)
[Program Description, page 130]

2301 Accounting for Non-Business Majors
An introduction to financial and managerial accounting with special emphasis on the use of accounting products. (Fall, Spring)

2311 Principles of Accounting I
The basic principles, concepts, and methods used in the generation of accounting data for financial statement preparation and interpretation. Asset, liability, and owner’s equity valuation and their relationship to income determination. (Fall, Spring)

2312 Principles of Accounting II
Continuation of ACCT 2311, but with emphasis on the use of accounting information for management planning, leading, controlling, and decision making through budgeting, cost and variance analysis, and responsibility accounting. Prerequisite: ACCT 2311. (Fall, Spring)

3311 Intermediate Accounting I
Principles underlying financial statements and accounting theory. Prerequisite: ACCT 2312. (Fall)

3312 Intermediate Accounting II
Continuation of ACCT 3311; accounting theory and special accounting problems. Prerequisite: ACCT 2312. (Spring)

3313 Cost Accounting
Cost determination and cost accounting systems for planning and control. Prerequisite: ACCT 2312. (Fall)

3315 Federal Income Tax I
Introduction to Federal income tax theory with special emphasis on the problems of individuals. Prerequisite: ACCT 2312. (Fall)

3316 Federal Income Tax I
Federal income tax theory and problems of partnerships, corporations, estates, and trusts. Prerequisite: ACCT 3315. (Spring)

3317 Accounting Systems
An introduction to computerized systems used to process accounting transactions. Prerequisites : ACCT 2312, BINF 2321. (Summer)

3318 Fraud Examination
Forensic Accounting and Fraud Examination are important parts of the arsenal of today’s professional accountant. This course concerns how and why occupational fraud is committed, how fraudulent conduct can be deterred, and how allegations of fraud should be investigated and resolved.

3319 Internship in Accounting
Practical experience in professional accounting through monitored work situation. Application must be made 60 days prior to registration. Prerequisites: minimum 3.0 GPA; 12 hours in accounting and permission of instructor. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

3320 Federal Income Tax III
Federal income tax theory and practice taught using a variety of exposures to taxation. The course provides an additional taxation course for accounting students considering a career in taxation or as a CPA. (Spring)

3345 International Accounting
A survey of the financial accounting, managerial accounting, and tax problems of multinational organizations. Prerequisites: ACCT 2312, BINT 3331. (Spring)
See BINT 3345.

4311 Advanced Accounting
Consolidations and consolidated financial statements, intercompany and branch transactions, partnerships and definitions of terms in the accounting equation. Prerequisite: ACCT 3312 and ACCT 3311. (Fall)

4313 Accounting for Non-Profit and Government Entities
Accounting, financial reporting, and budgeting for governmental and other nonprofit organizations. Prerequisite: ACCT 2312. (Spring)

4314 Auditing
Auditing theory, professional ethics, audit programs, and professional reports. Prerequisite: ACCT 3312 and ACCT 3311. (Spring)

4318 Ethics for Accounting and Business
This course addresses the need for an ethical system in today’s society, including examination of social problems and the role of business in their solution. In addition to ethical reasoning, integrity, objectivity, independence and other core values, special emphasis is placed on the Rules of Professional Conduct of the accounting profession, pursuant to Texas State Board of Public Accountancy Rule 511.58, which requires a three semester hour course in ethics to be eligible to sit for the CPA Examination in Texas.

BUSINESS: BANKING AND FINANCE (BFIN)
[Program Description, page 156]

3319/3619 Internship in Banking
Practical experience in the banking industry through monitored work experience. Prerequisites: minimum 3.0 GPA; 12 hours in BFIN and permission of instructor. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

3321 Principles of Financial Management
Basic financial concepts employed by management. Emphasis is on the decision-making processes followed by corporate financial managers. Topics include the time value of money, financial planning, capital budgeting, cost of capital. Prerequisite: ACCT 2311, ECON 2301, ECON 2302. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

3322 Intermediate Financial Management
Examination of financial theory and practice. Case studies are employed to understand the application of concepts and theories to practical situations. Prerequisites: BFIN 3321. (Spring)

3324 Investments
An introduction to the concepts, terminology and theory of investment management. Emphasis is placed on the investment activities of individuals and small businesses as they apply to portfolio management. Prerequisite: BFIN 3321. (Spring)

3325 Money and Capital Markets
The study of financial markets including the role of financial institutions and the supply and demand for funds. There is particular emphasis on U.S. markets and institutions including the supply and demand for funds. Prerequisites: BFIN 3321. (Fall, Spring)

3329 /3629 Internship in Finance
Practical experience in financial operations through monitored work experience. Prerequisites: minimum 3.0 GPA; 12 hours in BFIN and permission of instructor. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

3330 Money and Banking
The U.S. financial system, including financial markets, banking and non-bank financial institutions, and monetary policy. Prerequisite: BFIN 3321. (Fall, even numbered years)

3340 Financial Management of Non-profit Organizations
Examination of the financial and economic issues facing a non-profit organization including the time value of money, grant development and fund raising, loans, cash management and planning and budgeting. Prerequisites: ACCT 2311

3355 International Banking and Finance
Prerequisite: BFIN 3321. (Fall, Spring)
See BINT 3355

4304 Management of Financial Institutions
Application of the philosophies, methods, procedures and techniques required of bank
managers in a turbulent, deregulated environment. Prerequisites: BFIN 3321, ECON 2301, and BFIN 3330 (Spring)

4355 Capital Budgeting
Application and extension of the capital budgeting process as a tool of financial and economic analysis, planning and allocation of scarce resources, utilizing computers and spreadsheets. Prerequisite: BFIN 3321. (Fall)

4373 Case Studies in Financial Management
Practical exercises in solving financial management problems using case studies. Prerequisite: BFIN 3321. (Summer )

BUSINESS: BUSINESS LAW (BLAW)

3306 Sports Law
See SMHP 3306

3317 Business Law
General principles of business law to include contracts, torts, agency, business organizations, and government regulation of business. (Fall, Spring)

3318 Business Law for Accounting and Finance
Continuation of BLAW 3317; law of sales, commercial paper, debtor-creditor relationships, and real property. Recommended for students majoring in Accounting and/or Finance. Prerequisite: BLAW 3317. (Spring)

4320 International Business Law
Emphasis is on the law as it affects international business transactions; the law of international trade, investment restrictions, and technology transfer. Prerequisite: BLAW 3317. (Fall)

4340 Labor and Employment Law
Federal and State public policy and law regulation, collective bargaining, issues in ethics, and employment discrimination law. Prerequisite: BLAW 3317. (Spring, odd-numbered years)

BUSINESS: ECONOMICS (ECON)

2301 Principles of Macroeconomics
Introduction to economics and the economy. Monetary and fiscal policies of the Federal government as means of achieving full employment without inflation. Alternate macroeconomic approaches to current issues. (Fall, Spring)

2302 Principles of Microeconomics
Continuation of ECON 2301. Theory of product markets and resource markets. Alternate market structures are identified and evaluated, and policy for dealing with them is debated. Market theory used to develop policy for current economic problems. Prerequisite: ECON 2301 or permission of instructor. (Fall, Spring)

3340 Public Finance
Economic role of governments. The choice of public sector output in a free market economy. The effects of various taxes on resource allocation, income distribution and economic stabilization. Development finance. Prerequisites: ECON 2301 and ECON 2302 (Spring as needed)

3350 Latin American Economics
Description of the socio-economic reality of Latin America. The evolution of development strategies from the Maya to the present. Current issues including international trade, structural reform, migration, debt, and the Asian crisis. Policy implications for government and business. Prerequisites: ECON 2301 and ECON 2302 or BMDS 3370 permission of instructor. (Spring)

4310 International Economics
Introduction to the theory of international trade. Causes, benefits, and costs of trade. The foreign exchange market as a facilitator of trade. The balance of payments as a record of trade. Emphasis on current policy issues confronting the U.S. and its trading partners. Prerequisites: ECON 2301, ECON2302. (Fall)

4360 Econometrics
The application of statistical and mathematical methods to the analysis of economic data, with a purpose of giving empirical content to economic theories and verifying or refuting them. Hypothesis testing, multiple regression analysis, Ordinary Least Squares Estimation (OLS), lagged variables, logarithms and exponential functions, the specification and selection of models, diagnostic checking and recent developments in estimation techniques Prerequisites: ECON, 2301, ECON 2302, BMDS 3370 or Permission of Instructor. (Fall as needed)

BUSINESS: INFORMATION SYSTEMS (BINF)
[Program Description, page 132]

2321 Introduction to Information Systems
Theory, concepts, methods, and practice in the application of information systems management, methods and technologies to achieve business goals and objectives. Prerequisite: COMP 1301. (Fall, Spring)

2325 Personal Productivity Application
Concepts, methods, and practice in the effective use of end-user productivity software and integration of desktop products. Prerequisite: COMP 1301. (Fall, Spring)

2328 Hardware and Systems Software
Instruction and practice in the assembly of microcomputer hardware components into a working system, in the use of operating system functions and utilities, and in the selection of hardware and software for a small business or home system. Prerequisite: COMP 1301. (Fall)

2330 Programming Languages I
Introduction to programming design and development emphasizing structured programming techniques: vehicle language Visual Basic. NET. Prerequisite: BINF 2325 or permission of the instructor. (Spring)

3319 Internship in IS
Practical experience in IS through a monitored work experience. Application must be made 60 days prior to registration. Prerequisites: minimum GPA of 3.0, 12 hours in BINF and approval of the Business Information Systems coordinator required. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

3330 Programming Languages II
Continuation of Programming Languages I with an emphasis on object-oriented programming methodologies and advanced language features: vehicle language Visual Basic.NET. Prerequisite: BINF 2330. (Fall)

3362 Systems Analysis and Specification
This course will teach students to accomplish preliminary investigation, feasibility assessment, systems analysis and specification of business requirements for databases and information systems. Prerequisites: BINF 2321 and BINF 2330. (Fall)

3363 Design and Implementation of Databases and Systems
A continuation of topics introduced in BINF 3362. Students will have supervised experience in designing, developing, testing, documenting and implementing business databases and information systems. Prerequisite: BINF 3362. (Spring) 3367

3367 Introduction to Networks and Telecommunications
Basic telecommunications terminology and concepts. Introduction to voice and data networks, including technology, hardware and software. Prerequisites: BINF 2321 and BINF 2328. (Spring)

3388 Information Systems Practicum
Application of IS skills and practices through a supervised project experience. Application must be made 60 days prior to registration. Prerequisites: minimum GPA of 3.0, 12 hours in BINF and approval of the Business Information Systems coordinator required. Credit hours vary depending on project. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

4360 Advanced IS Concepts
The study of advanced Information Systems concepts and techniques used in complex organizations. Prerequisite: BINF 2321. (Fall)

4363 Electronic Business Strategy, Architecture and Design
This course provides an introduction to electronic business strategy and the development and architecture of electronic business solutions and their components. Prerequisites: BINF 2321 and BMGT 3340 or permission of the instructor. (Fall)

4370 Project Management
This course covers the factors necessary for successful management of system development or enhancement projects. Both technical and behavioral management aspects of project management are discussed. Prerequisite: BINF 3363 or permission of the instructor. (Spring)

BUSINESS: INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS (BINT)
[Program Description, page 159 ]

3319/3619 Internship in International Business
Practical experience in international operations through directed and monitored work experience. Arrangements with instructor must be made 60 days prior to registration. Prerequisites: minimum GPA: 3.0; 12 hours in BINT and permission of instructor. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

3331 International Business Management
Analysis of business opportunities and political climates, trade barriers, government incentives, currency flow and financial systems and trade practices. Emphasis on current issues and readings. Prerequisites: ECON 2302, BMGT 3340 or permission of instructor. (Fall, Spring)

3345 International Accounting
A survey of the financial accounting, managerial accounting and tax problems of multinational organizations. Prerequisites: ACCT 2312, BINT 3331. (Spring)

3350 Latin American Economics
Description of the socio-economic reality of Latin America. The evolution of development strategies from the Maya to the present. Current issues including international trade, structural reform, migration, debt, and the Asian crisis. Policy implications for government and business. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective. Prerequisites: ECON 2301, ECON 2302 and BMDS 3370 or permission of instructor. (Spring)

3355 International Banking and Finance
International business transactions, sources of funding, relationship with international financial institutions and capital instruments. Relates international business funding to national and commercial development. Prerequisites: ACCT 2311, BINT 3331, BFIN 3330. (Spring)

3361 International Marketing
Analysis of international markets and opportunities for the international organization and the independent businessperson. Emphasis is on the use of data for analyzing market potential, support services of freight and insurance, and international currency movement. Discussion of current international situations which create market potential. Prerequisite: BINT/BMKT 3331 or permission of instructor. (Fall, Spring)

4310 International Economics
Introduction to the theory of international trade. Causes, benefits, and costs of trade. The foreign exchange market as a facilitator of trade. The balance of payments as a record of trade. Emphasis on current policy issues confronting the U.S. and its trading partners. Prerequisites: ECON 2301 or ECON2302. (Fall)

4320 International Business Law
Emphasis is on the law as it affects international business transactions; the law of international trade, investment restrictions, and technology transfer. Prerequisite: BLAW 3317. (Fall)

4360 Cross Border
Develops practical skills necessary for a small business owner to transact business in Mexico by providing opportunities to experience the border trade process firsthand. Includes fact-finding work to examine trade services in Laredo, San Antonio, and Mexico. Prerequisites: BINT 3331 International Business Management. (Fall)

4380 Importing
An analysis of the importing process, sources of supply, currency implications, government regulations, and current issues affecting the importing process. Prerequisite: BINT 3331

4390 International Policies and Relations
Concentrated course offered in a host country to expose students to current trade policy issues and international relations. May include Embassy speakers, visits to factories, seminars with trade specialists or study-abroad experiences. Fee. Prerequisite: BINT 3331.

BUSINESS: MANAGEMENT (BMGT)
[Program Description, page 159 ]

3319/3619 Internships in Management
Practical experience in management through monitored work experience. Prerequisites: minimum GPA of 3.0 and permission of instructor. Internships can only replace elective courses, not required courses. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

3340 Management Theory and Practice
Introduction to the theories, concepts and functions of management. Topics include
planning, organizing, leading, staffing, controlling, business and managerial ethics and decision-making. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

3354 Human Resource Management
Theories and concepts used in managing business personnel. Topics include: personnel planning, recruiting, selection, compensation, separation and retirement. Prerequisites: BMGT 3340: Junior standing. (Spring, Fall)

4340 Management Skills
Course provides students with fundamental skills and insights necessary for success. Course design is based on learning through experience, and is directed toward student involvement in developing and practicing job-relevant managerial skills. The material is presented in the form of self-assessments, in-basket exercises, and skill-building exercises. Prerequisite: BMGT 3340. (Spring)

4345 Entrepreneurship/Small Business Management
Comprehensive study of management activities associated with entrepreneurial ventures and small businesses. Topics include analysis of opportunities, development of venture strategy and small business problem solving. Student teams may act as consultants to small businesses. Prerequisite: completion of business core. Prerequisite: Senior standing (Fall)

4351 Seminar in Business and Society
Comprehensive study of the relationship between for profit and non-profit organizations and the environment in which they operate. Emphasis is on the analysis of business-society problems and issues and the formulation of appropriate managerial solutions. Prerequisites: completion of business core or permission of instructor. Prerequisite: Senior standing (Spring)

4355 Organizational Behavior and Leadership
Presentation of theory and research in Organizational Behavior (O.B.) combined with experiential exercises to develop students’ ability to take responsibility for making and living with decisions about their behavior. Awareness of the realities of organization interdependencies and their consequences for individuals. Focus is on modifying behavior and predicting the effects upon productivity, satisfaction, and development of individuals as members of the business unit. Prerequisite: BMGT 3340. (Fall)

4356 Fundamentals of Organizational Change and Development
This course introduces the discipline of Organizational Development (O.D.), including definitions, values, ethics and O.D. as a normative process. Change theory and practice and the role of the change agent/O.D. professional are examined. Traditional O.D. interventions and current applications of O.D. thought are surveyed. The course is experiential in nature and incorporates an action research project. (Spring)

4363 Electronic Business Strategy, Architecture and Design
This course provides an introduction to electronic business strategy and the development and architecture of electronic business solutions and their components. Prerequisites: BINF 2321, BMGT 3340 and permission of the instructor. (Fall) Cross-listed with BINF 4363.

4380 Integrative Business Analysis and Decision Making I
Initial Capstone course designed to prepare students for a rigorous examination of their ability to apply their undergraduate education across the entire spectrum of business management and decision making as required in the second phase of the Capstone experience. Students are introduced to the analytical process required to develop strategic options for decision-making in each of the functional areas of business. Prerequisite: Senior standing and permission of instructor. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

4381 Integrative Business Analysis and Decision Making II
The final Capstone experience during which the student demonstrates his/her competency in applying the knowledge gained in the respective degree programs. This course integrates the concepts, theories, and skills learned in other business disciplines through analysis and development of corporate strategy and policy. Additionally, students will prepare for employment in the business environment. Prerequisite: BMGT 4380 and permission of the instructor. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

BUSINESS MANAGEMENT DECISION SCIENCES (BMDS)

3370 Analytical Decision Making I
Analytical Decision Making in Business I is the first in a sequence of three courses which will utilize mathematical and statistical techniques in the analysis of managerial problems, the design of new and improved systems, and the implementation of results in order to achieve desired systems performance. The emphasis of Analytical Decision Making is Business is on problem recognition, problem formulation, selection of proper techniques, problem solutions, and evaluation of results. The use of electronic spreadsheets and statistical software packages is an integral part of this course. The student will learn how to collect, summarize, and interpret data. Subject material in this introductory quantitative course will range from financial and presentation models to linear programming to probability models to finally probability distributions. Prerequisite: Math 1304 or equivalent. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

3371 Analytical Decision Making II
The second in a sequence of three courses, Analytical Decision Making in Business II continues the use of mathematical and statistical techniques in the analysis of managerial problems, the design of new and improved systems, and the implementation of results in order to achieve desired systems performance. The emphasis of Analytical Decision Making is Business is on problem recognition, problem formulation, selection of proper techniques, problem solutions and evaluation of results. The use of electronic spreadsheets and statistical software packages is an integral part of this course. Subject material in this second quantitative course will typically include more instruction on modeling change and optimization models with additional emphasis on statistical inference and statistical analytical techniques. Prerequisite: BMDS 3370. (Fall, Spring)

3372 Analytical Decision Making III
The final course in a sequence of three, Analytical Decision Making in Business III continues the use of mathematical and statistical techniques in the analysis of managerial problems, the design of new and improved systems, and the implementation of results in order to achieve desired systems performance. The emphasis of Analytical Decision Making is Business is on problem recognition, problem formulation, selection of proper techniques, problem solutions and evaluation of results. The use of electronic spreadsheets and statistical software packages is an integral part of this course. Subject material in this third quantitative course elevates the student’s knowledge of advanced statistical and analytical techniques; such topics as simulation modeling, simple and multiple regression; and time series analysis and forecasting will be addressed. Prerequisite: BMDS 3371. (Fall, Spring)

4370 Project Management
This course covers the factors necessary for successful management of system development or enhancement projects. Both technical and behavioral management aspects of project management are discussed. Prerequisite: BINF 2321, BMDS 3371 and permission of the instructor. (Spring) Cross-listed with BFIN 4370.

BUSINESS: MARKETING (BMKT)
[Program Description, page 134]

3319/3619 Internship in Marketing
Practical experience in marketing through monitored work experience. Prerequisite: minimum 3.0 GPA; 12 hours in BMKT and permission of the instructor. (Fall, Spring)

3331 Principles of Marketing
Introductory course providing comprehensive coverage of marketing concepts and strategies A managerial approach is used that focuses on the practices, problems and decisions of the marketing manager. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

3333 Fundamentals of Advertising
Theory and practices of advertising, including market segmentation, media management, research, testing and post-campaign evaluation. Prerequisite: BMKT 3331. (Fall, Spring)

3334 Service Marketing
Marketing concepts and strategies as they relate to the service organization; growth of the service economy; nature and characteristics of service organizations and the problems and opportunities posed by those characteristics and the development of effective marketing strategies. Prerequisite: BMKT 3331. (Fall)

3335 Sales Management
Strategic planning, execution, and evaluation of the sales function within an organization. Emphasis is on territory design, performance, and evaluation. Compensation and sales force training are also analyzed. Prerequisite: BMKT 3331. (Fall)

3340 Retailing
A survey of retail institutions and their environments, resources, and markets; review of the planning, purchasing, procurement and promotion functions; discussions on fundamental structural changes in consumer purchasing patterns and their effects on retailing. (Spring)

3361 International Marketing
See BINT 3361.

3377 Consumer Behavior
An overall view of the basic perspectives of consumer behavior, this course uses an interdisciplinary approach that integrates the fields of economics, psychology, sociology and anthropology as they relate to marketing and buyer behavior. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective. Prerequisite: BMKT 3331 or permission of instructor. (Spring)

4375 Market Research
A study of qualitative and quantitative research procedures and techniques utilized in marketing research projects. Practical application of procedures and techniques is emphasized through class research projects in problem definition, questionnaire design and sampling techniques. Prerequisites: BMKT 3331 and BMGT 3370 . (Fall, Spring)

4380 Importing
An analysis of the importing process, sources of supply, currency implications, government regulations, and current issues affecting the importing process. Prerequisite: BINT 3331. (Spring)

4390 Marketing Management
Investigation of the decision-making process of the marketing manager, using the case method. Focus is on the management of the marketing function, strategy formation,
execution and control. Prerequisite: BMKT 3331, BMKT 3334, and BMKT 3377. (Fall, Spring)

CHEMISTRY (CHEM)
[Program Description, page 172]

1101/1102 Chemical Principles Laboratory I and II
This course offers laboratory experiments chosen to illustrate concepts taught in the lecture. Must be taken in sequence. Co-requisite: 1301/1302. Fee.


1301/1302 Chemical Principles I and II
This course studies fundamental laws and theories of chemistry: the modern concept of the atom, atomic structure and periodic
properties of the elements, kinetic-molecular theory, states of matter, solutions, acids, bases, and salts, oxidation-reduction, equilibrium,
thermodynamics, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, bonding. Must be taken in sequence. Prerequisite: MATH 1304.

1310 Biological Chemistry I
This course studies fundamental principles of chemistry related specifically to allied health sciences. Does not satisfy the core science requirement or chemistry requirements for degree programs in biology, chemistry, nutrition, environmental science, medical technology, or nuclear medicine

1320 Biological Chemistry II
This course is an introduction to organic and biological chemistry to topics related to allied health science. The course also includes a
laboratory component that includes hands-on laboratory experiments on concepts on general, organic and biochemistry. Does not satisfy the core science requirements or chemistry requirements for degree programs in biology, chemistry, nutrition, environmental science, medical
technology, or nuclear medicine. Prerequisite: CHEM 1310.

2111, 2112 Organic Chemistry Laboratory I and II
This course presents techniques in organic chemistry, the preparation of organic compounds, and includes the analysis of synthetic products by chemical and spectroscopic methods. Must be taken in sequence. Prerequisite: CHEM 1101, 1102. Co-requisite: 2311/2312. Fee.

2160, 2260 Chemical Research
This course allows the student to study a chemistry problem independently and to prepare a written report based on the investigation. Must be taken for a minimum of 2 semesters. Credit hours will vary between 1 and 3 hours depending on the work performed. Prerequisite: CHEM 1302, 1102 and permission of the instructor. Fee.

2311/2312 Organic Chemistry I and II
This course studies the structure and uses of main classes of organic compounds, functional groups and their inter-conversion; characteristics of chemical bonding; stereochemistry; acid-base reactions, resonance and inductive effects, and reaction mechanisms. Must be taken in sequence. Prerequisite: CHEM 1301, 1302.

2420 Introductory Analytical Chemistry
The course is concerned with the treatment of equilibria that are of analytical importance and with an introduction into electro analytical methods, emission and absorption spectrophotometry, and modern separation methods, particularly chromatography. The primary objectives of the lab are to introduce the student to current analytical methods and to cultivate sound experimental technique. Prerequisites: CHEM 1301, 1302, 1101 and 1102.

2430 Applied Chemical Research I
This is an introduction to science writing, library research and effective oral communication of scientific information. Students will work individually and in groups to develop their communication skills, both oral and written. Each student will write a series of papers culminating in a major paper on an appropriate topic. Students will also give an oral report on a topic from that research. Prerequisite: CHEM 1302, 1102.

2431 Applied Chemical Research II
Students will work individually and in a group on research projects, on-campus or
off-campus at a San Antonio research facility. Students will write a term paper outlining the research findings and take part in a final oral defense of their work. Prerequisite: CHEM 2430

3421 Quantitative Analysis and Laboratory
This course presents the classical chemical methods of analysis including gravimetric and volumetric analysis, statistical treatment of data, separations. Experiments illustrate techniques and methods discussed in the lecture. Prerequisites: CHEM 1301, 1302, 1101, and 1102. Fee. (Fall, even-numbered years)

4101 Seminar
This course provides the opportunity for guest lecturers, readings, reports, and discussion on topics of chemical interest. Up to 3 semester hours credit may be designated for this course. In this course, students apply principles learned in lectures. May be approved for graduate
credit. Prerequisite: CHEM 2312, 2112. Permission of advisor required. Fee.

4151 Biochemistry Laboratory
In this course, students apply principles learned in lectures. May be approved for graduate credit. Permission of advisor required. Co-requisite: CHEM 4351. Fee

4160/4260 Advanced Chemical Research
These courses allow the student to study a chemistry problem independently and to prepare a written report based on the investigation. Must be taken for a minimum of 2 semesters. Credit hours will vary between 1 and 3 hours depending on the work performed. Prerequisites: CHEM 1302, 1102 and permission of the instructor. Fee.

4331 Physical Chemistry I
This course studies the physics of matter and chemical behavior, gases, liquids, solids, solutions, equilibria, colloids, macromolecules, kinetics, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, spectroscopy, statistical mechanics, quantum mechanics, atomic and molecular structure. Prerequisite: CHEM 1301, 1302, 1101, 1102, 6 semester hours of calculus (MATH 2312/2313), and 8 semester hours of Physics (PHYS 2305/2105, PHYS 2306/2106). May be approved for graduate credit. Permission of advisor required. (Fall, odd-numbered years)

4351/4352 Biochemistry I and II
These courses study the structure and function of biologically significant molecules: enzymology, intermediary metabolism, and biosynthesis of macromolecules, bioenergetics, and molecular biology. Cross-referenced as BIOL 4451. Prerequisite: for CHEM 4351: CHEM 2311 and prerequisite for CHEM 4352: CHEM 4351. May be approved for graduate credit. Permission of advisor required.

4422 Instrumental Analysis and Laboratory
This course studies basic electronics, electrochemistry; spectroscopic methods of analysis including IR, UV-Vis, NMR, atomic absorption and emission; gas and liquid chromatography. It also offers laboratory problems utilizing procedures covered in the lecture. Prerequisite: CHEM 3421. May be approved for graduate credit. Permission of advisor. Fee. (Spring, odd numbered years)

4432 Physical Chemistry II and Laboratory
This is a continuation of CHEM 4331. Laboratory experiments are chosen to demonstrate ideas taught in the lecture. Prerequisite: CHEM 4331. May be approved for graduate credit. Permission of advisor required. Fee. (Spring, even numbered years)

COMMUNICATION ARTS (COMM)
[Program Description, page 158]

1301 Introduction to Mass Communication
This course studies the nature and function of mass communication systems. Includes the history, structure, and interrelationships of the components of mass media, as well as the relationship between media and society. This class is a prerequisite to other classes for Communication Arts majors. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective.

1305 Computer Literacy for Communication Arts
This course introduces basic computer terminology skills and concepts in communication. The student receives hands-on experience in file management techniques, Internet and e-mail software, online library databases and software, word processing and presentation software, spreadsheet and database management software. Media software and communication applications will be emphasized. This course meets the computer literacy requirements for Communication Arts majors. Fee.

2310 Theories of Communication
A survey of past and current trends in communication theory. The class emphasis is on perspectives found in social science and cultural studies. May be taken as a Cultural Studies
elective. Prerequisite: COMM 1301. (Every semester)

2315 Writing for the Media
An examination and practice of the types of writing that are produced in the media arena. In this course, the emphasis is on style, structure, and techniques involved in print journalism, copywriting, broadcast journalism, public
relations writing, and scriptwriting. Prerequisites: COMM 1301, ENGL 1311.


2320 Audio Production I
This class introduces the student to audio production theory and technique. The course focuses on sound aesthetics and values while
providing an overview of traditional analog sound production and audio equipment. It is an
introduction to desktop audio and the digital audio workstation, which includes an
introduction to Protools or other editing
software. Radio station production will be required. Fee. Prerequisite: COMM 1301.

2345 Introduction to Desktop Publishing
This course is a basic introduction to the digital techniques of combining text and graphics. It prepares the student for freelance publishing. Fee. Prerequisites: COMM 1301, COMM 1305.

2354 Journalism I
This class explores the fundamentals of
writing news for print and electronic media with an emphasis on newspaper journalism. Class focus will be on story organization, leads, style, clarity, conciseness, attribution, balance, objectivity, etc. Prerequisite: COMM 1301

2357 Introduction to Photography
This course will explore the principles of black and white photography as a means of visual self-expression and the technical skills involved. This class offers instruction in the use of the camera and darkroom equipment. Fee. 35mm camera required. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective. Recommended: ARTS 1311.

2358 Video Production I
This course offers an examination of the
theory and techniques of video production including scriptwriting, production management, camera operation, basic lighting design and set design. Emphasis is placed on studio production. Fee. Prerequisite: COMM 1301.

3358 Digital Photography
Digital photography is a process for creating images using the controlled reactions of light and a photo-electric microchip followed by computer manipulation. This is a studio art/graphic production course providing the student an opportunity to explore the contemporary uses of digital photography in artistic and graphic design production. Fee. (Summer and as needed)

3320 Aesthetics of Vision and Sound
This class explores the theory and principles of sight and sound values that relate
to media production. It involves examination of color, light, space, time-motion and sound. Prerequisite: COMM 1301. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective. Recommended: ARTS 1311.

3325 Writing the Script
This class explores the principles, techniques, and practice of script preparation. This course focuses on commercial and promotional writing for radio/television, including script formats, verbal to visual style, budgets, and presentation skills. Prerequisite: COMM 1301.

3330 Impact of Media on Society
This course is an intensive study of the influence and interplay of media on various aspects of our culture. Topics may include the socio-economic and physiological effects of media, and the imagery and impact of advertising. Topics will vary each semester. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective. Prerequisite: COMM 1301.

3340 Computer Graphics & Visual Communications
This class is an introduction to the techniques of creating computer-generated graphics. The student will learn basic design and production of computer-generated
graphics using Adobe Photoshop and other software. Fee. Prerequisite: COMM 1301 & 1305.


3353 Television Journalism
In this class, students learn the principles of writing, editing, and presenting television news. It incorporates an overview from newsroom organization to basic television news gathering and studio production. Fee. Prerequisites: COMM 1301, 2315. Recommended: COMM 2354, 2358.

3354 Journalism II
In this class, the fundamentals of gathering and reporting information for the news media are analyzed. The class emphasis will be on gathering facts, observation, interviewing, and research. The course includes an advanced news-writing component. Prerequisites: COMM 1301, 2354.

3355 Publications Practicum
This class gives students practical experience working for the Logos. Students will design, write, and publish the University newspaper. Course may be repeated for elective credit. Prerequisite: COMM 1301.

3390 Radio Practicum
This class gives students practical experience working for the campus radio
station. Students will manage, promote, produce, and broadcast on the radio station. Course may be repeated for elective credit. Prerequisite: COMM 1301 for Comm. Arts majors only. Fee.

3317 Diversity in the Media
This course explores diversity and its role in the media, including the influence of various political, social, gender, race, class, age and economic factors in the makeup of those in the news media, decisions involved in media coverage and what various media — including newspapers, radio stations, TV stations, web sites, ads, sitcoms, dramas, documentaries and movies – portray about various peoples and topics on a historical and cultural basis. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective. Prerequisite: COMM 1301.

3359 Video Production II
Topics in this class explore the theory and technique of video production with an emphasis on remote location and electronic news gathering (ENG). Projects include news and feature stories, as well as commercials and music video. Fee. Prerequisite: COMM 1301, COMM 2358.

3365 Multimedia Design and Production
This class provides students with the basic production technology necessary to design and create multimedia. Students will be given the opportunity to learn various tools concentrating on different aspects of the technology: text, graphics, audio, video and website technology. Through developing their own multimedia, students will explore how this technology can be used in society as a communication tool for education, industry and media production. Fee. Prerequisites: COMM 1301, COMM 1305, COMM 2320, COMM 3359.

3380 Announcing/Performance
In this class, students will explore announcing techniques for radio and on camera performance. It includes news casting (anchoring, reporting and interviewing), commercial talent, on-camera acting, and casting sessions. Emphasis is placed on individual performance and
evaluation using professional scripts and video playback. Radio station production will be required. Fee. Prerequisites: COMM 1301. Recommended: COMM 2358.

4305 Communications, Technology, and Society
This class provides an introduction to new technology and explores the ramifications of the use of that technology and its impact on current culture. This course will help students to
critically explore the new forms of communication and their effects on the societal dynamics, which fiber optics, satellites, teleconferencing, the Internet and personal computing have forged in our culture. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective. Prerequisite: COMM 1301.

4310 Communication Research
This class introduces students to the primary research methods used to study communication processes, including surveys, content analysis, and experimental research. Students will become familiar with the major communication journals and will learn to read and to interpret research results, as well as to design simple studies of their own. Prerequisites: COMM 1301. Recommended: ARTS 2311

4315 Media Ethics
This class examines media standards and employs case studies, text, and discussion
sessions. It is designed to help students develop their own standards concerning the communication arts. Topics include censorship, free speech, government regulations, and media accountability. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective. Prerequisite: COMM 1301. (Every semester)

4322 Seminar in Selected Film Topics
This class offers discussion and study of various topics in cinematography and the film industry. Content will include screen artists (specific directors, producers, screenwriters, and
cinematographers), as well as film genres, content analysis, and the business of the film industry. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective. Prerequisite: COMM 1301.

4328 Internship
This course offers academic credit earned through practical experience. Students work part time in the professional media with the guidance of an on-site supervisor. Minimum 140-160 hours of work required. Prerequisite: COMM 1301, 2310, 2315, and Permission of instructor. May be repeated once for credit. (Every semester)

4332 Law and the Media
This class is an introduction to law and policy related to mass communication. Libel, privacy, news gathering, and broadcast regulations are explored. Prerequisites: COMM 1301, 2310 and 2315. (Every Semester)

4335 News and Feature Editing
The objective of this class is to edit news and feature stories for clarity, conciseness, correctness, thoroughness, fairness, and style. Other topics covered include exercising news judgment using headline writing, and visual aspects of news presentation. Prerequisite: COMM 1301.

4340 Design, Layout & Print Production
This class features principles and Application of graphics used in the Communication arts professions. It examines design, layout, paste-up and typography of graphics, both fundamental and current trends. Fee. Prerequisites: COMM 1301, COMM 1305. Recommended: ARTS 2311

4347 Electronic Publishing & Web Design
This course explores the impact and potential of publishing via new electronic media. Students will become familiar with a variety of on-line publications, will learn about the similarities and differences between electronic and other forms of publishing, and will practice the non-linear writing and design techniques required for electronic publishing. Prerequisite: COMM 1301, COMM 1305, COMM 3340 or permission of instructor.

4348 Journalism History
This class explores the role and the evolution of journalism including the influence of various political and economic changes in journalist practices, and the role of journalism in society. It also covers the history and evolution of various technologies used to present the news. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective. Prerequisite: COMM 1301.

4350 Photojournalism
This class focuses on principles techniques required in photojournalism. It combines the critical analysis of famous photojournalists with the practice of the technical aspects of making a photographic essay. Prerequisite: COMM 1301, 2357. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective.

4352 Radio Journalism
This class examines the principles of writing and editing news for radio. It incorporates an overview from newsroom organization to basic broadcast news writing skill development. Radio station production will be required. Fee. Prerequisite: COMM 1301.

4355 Magazine Article Writing
This course offers practice in writing magazine articles with emphasis on marketing manuscripts. It focuses on magazine article
genres and development of individual styles. Prerequisite: COMM 1301, 2315.

4358 Producing/Directing Seminar
This course emphasizes pre-production elements, production management, production values and development of directing techniques. Practical training is taught through individual production projects that require a comprehensive approach. It includes a critical analysis of
professional directors’ interpretations as well as professional producers’ approaches. Fee. Prerequisites: COMM 1301, 3359, or permission of instructor.

4359 Corporate/Educational Video
This course focuses on the use of video in corporate and educational applications. It includes project development and client presentation. Fee. Prerequisites: COMM 1301, 3359 or permission of instructor.

4361 Advanced Audio Production
This class examines advanced theory and technique in audio production, including
multi-track and audio-for-video. It emphasizes hands-on studio production and sound design. Radio station production will be required. Fee. Prerequisites: COMM 1301, 2320 or permission of instructor.

4390 Senior Portfolio
This course covers the building of an
electronic portfolio (DVD or CD-ROM). The course emphasizes the preparation of a multimedia or print portfolio for professional development and evaluation. This is the capstone course for the Communication Arts undergraduate degree. FEE. Prerequisites: Senior standing.

4399 Selected Topics
This course is an investigation of an issue or topic of current interest in the communication arts. Topics will vary each semester. It may include projects or productions. Prerequisite: COMM 1301.

4628 Extended Internship
This course offers additional credit hours to those students having to do in-depth internship hours beyond those of COMM 4328. Students work part-time in the professional media with the guidance of an on-site supervisor. Minimum 280-320 hours of work required. Experience in a current position within the media field may be considered towards fulfillment of required work hours. Experience must constitute equivalency toward a media internship. Permission of the instructor and the Chair of Communication Arts is required. Prerequisites: COMM 1301, 2310, 2315.

COMPUTER GRAPHIC ARTS (CART)
[Program Description, page 161]

1101 Computer Graphic Arts Orientation
This lecture course serves as the entry-level course for incoming freshman entering the
computer graphic arts program. The course will cover curriculum issues, industry norms and standards, curriculum expectations, and graphics standard practices.

1301 Introduction to Computer Graphic Arts
This studio/lecture course is a basic overview of computer graphics. Hands-on training with web browsing, word processing, page layout, digital image making, scanning and printing. Topics include computer graphics concepts, terminology, processes and procedures. This course fulfills the UIW Computer Literacy core requirement for CART majors only. Fee.

1302 Digital Imaging
This studio/lecture course covers principles of digital image processing and electronic
illustration. Emphasis on raster and vector image making and the creative aspects of electronic illustration for commercial and fine art
applications. Topics include integration of text and images, creative drawing and painting, photography concepts and printing practices. Fee.

1380 Foundations of Digital Design
This studio/lecture course investigates the fundamental concepts of two-dimensional design elements and principles and how they relate to visual communication design. Emphasis for this course is in the theory of design incorporating standard digital tools to aid in this exploration period. Topics include understanding communication design using two-dimensional design
elements and principles, comparing and
contrasting various design styles using digital techniques and tools, and a historical overview and analysis of design through art and design
history. Fee.

1390 Typography
This studio/lecture course explores
fundamental concepts of typography and the relationship between typography and communication. Topics may include letterforms, the expressive qualities of type, typographic systems and use of type as a visual problem-solving tool. Fee.

2300 Web Design I: Introduction to Design for Web
This studio/lecture course covers internet web page design, web page animation and
related graphic design issues including mark-up languages, web sites, Internet access software, and interactive topics. Fee. Prerequisite: CART 1301, 1302, 1380, 1390.

2301 3D Animation I: Modeling
This studio/lecture course covers basic 3D modeling and rendering techniques. Emphasis on building and modifying 3D geometry,
defining surface materials, lights and cameras, rendering still images. Topics include historical overview and theoretical analysis of digital 3D modeling and rendering. Fee.

2310 Print Design I: Introduction to Design for Print
Basic Print Design. This studio/lecture course covers basic issues in page layout,
development of grid systems and page design for sequence and series applications. Also covered are print and pre-press production concepts. Fee. Prerequisite: CART 1301, 1302, 1380, 1390.


2311 3D Animation II: Animation
This studio/lecture course covers basic 3D animation techniques. Emphasis on keyframe animation, hierarchical motion, inverse kinematics, morphing and camera motion. Topics include historical overview and theoretical analysis of digital 3D animation. Fee. Prerequisite: CART 2301

3300 Web Design II: Advanced Web Design
This studio/lecture course is an advanced seminar in a web design. Topics include scripting, web site planning, testing, security, production, and marketing. Incorporation of recent developments in the field of Internet communications into a web site. Fee. Prerequisite: CART 2300

3301 3D Animation III: Narrative Animation
This studio/lecture course covers narrative 3D computer animation. Emphasis on storytelling, continuity, virtual cinematography, and digital editing. Topics include historical overview and analysis of 3D special effects in cinema and video. Fee. Prerequisite: CART 2311

3310 Print Design II: Visual Systems
Intermediate Print Design. This studio lecture course covers concepts and techniques used in establishing visual identity, establishing brand identity and working on multiple platforms (PC and Macintosh). Also covered are additional commercial print and production concepts. Fee. Prerequisite: CART 2310.

3311 3-D Animation IV : Character Animation
This studio/lecture course covers 3D character animation. Emphasis on the creation of a detailed character with personality and complex, expressive movement. Topics include historical overview and analysis of 3D animated characters in cinema and video. Fee. Prerequisite: CART 3301
3321 History of Animation This lecture course is a survey of the history of animation and special effects. Overview includes traditional, experimental, and digital media. Emphasis is placed on the history of US animation; however, international animation will also be covered extensively.

4100 Commercial Arts Seminar
This lecture course services as an introduction to the trends of the business. It includes presentations by professional digital artists, business people, and vendors. Also includes research projects to increase awareness of digital media source information. This one credit course must be taken three times. This course must be repeated three times for graduation.

4300 Web Design III; Web/Multimedia/Database Integration
This studio/lecture course covers integration of e-commerce centered web design. Emphasis on online purchasing, multimedia content optimization, and web content delivery. Fee. Prerequisite: CART 3300.

4301 Advanced Projects Practicum
This studio/lecture course covers gives students an opportunity to apply all the skills and concepts gained in earlier classes. Emphasis on producing large-scale, high-quality, creative work for inclusion in the Senior Portfolio. Topics focus on areas of specialization, thoroughly investigating issues of current interest in Computer Graphic Arts. Prerequisite: Level IV in an area of concentration.

4302 Cooperative Education Internship
On-the-job training and observation at a Computer Graphic Arts related business. Work 15-20 hours per week and meet with instructor 1 hour per week. Topics include ‘real-world’ work place conditions and standards. Prerequisite: Level IV in an area of concentration.

4303 Senior Portfolio
This studio/lecture course is the final course for the CART Degree. Emphasis on preparation and enhancement of a professional portfolio. Topics include job-seeking strategies, presentation skills, and enhancement of a professional portfolio. To be taken in the final semester.

4310 Print Design III: Information Design
Advanced Print Design. This studio/lecture course covers concepts and techniques of informational and way finding design. Also covered are additional print and production concepts. Fee. Prerequisite: CART 3310

4311 3D Animation V: Production
This studio/lecture course covers theories and procedures for producing digital video/audio files using desktop computers. Much focus will be on the team aspect of 3D production. Fee. Prerequisite: CART 3311

4320 Web I Bridge: Introduction to Design for Web
Basic Web Design for transfer students. This studio/lecture course covers Internet web page design, web page animation and related graphic design issues including mark-up languages, web sites, Internet access software, and interactive topics. Fee. Prerequisites: CART 1301, 1302, 1380, and 1390.

4340 3D Animation I: Bridge
This studio/lecture course covers basic 3D modeling and rendering techniques for transfer students. Emphasis on building and modifying 3D geometry, defining surface materials, lights and cameras, rendering still images. Topics include historical overview and theoretical analysis of digital 3D modeling and rendering. Fee. Prerequisites: 1301, 1302, and 3321.


4350 3D Animation II: Bridge
This studio/lecture course covers basic 3D animation techniques for transfer students. Emphasis on keyframe animation, hierarchical motion, inverse kinematics, morphing and camera motion. Topics include historical overview and theoretical analysis of digital 3D animation. Fee. Prerequisites: CART 2301 or CART 4340.

4390 World Graphics Study Away
This lecture/travel course provides students a chance to see how the graphics industry
operates throughout culture hubs of the world. Course content includes required travel to city or cities of focus each semester.

COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS (CIS)
[Program Description, page 163]

2325 Personal Productivity
Applications Concepts, methods, and practice in the effective use of end-user productivity software and integration of desktop products. Cross-referenced with BINF 2325. Prerequisite: COMP 1301. (Fall, Spring)

2328 Hardware and Systems Software
Instruction and practice in the assembly of microcomputer hardware components into a working system, in the use of operating system functions and utilities, and in the selection of hardware and software for a small business or home system. Cross-referenced with BINF 2328. Prerequisite: COMP 1301. (Fall)

2330 Programming Languages I
Introduction to programming design and development emphasizing structured programming techniques: vehicle language Visual Basic. NET. Cross-referenced with BINF 2330. Prerequisite: BINF 2325 or permission of the instructor. (Spring)

2335 Network +
Introduction to networking essentials including networking media and topologies, protocols and standards, network implementation and network support. Prerequisite: CIS 2328. (Spring)

2340 Windows Operating Systems
Introduction to current Microsoft professional operating systems. Focus is on developing the skills necessary to install, configure and administer these operating systems on stand-alone and client computers. Prerequisite: COMP 1301. (Fall)

2350 UNIX I
Introduction to the UNIX (Linux) operating systems including processes, memory and file system management, multi-user concepts, use of system editors, basic commands and shell scripts. Prerequisite: COMP 1301. (Spring)

3310 Introduction to Database Systems
Introduction to database systems with a special emphasis on relational database system concepts, architecture and the use of structured query language (SQL) to process information. Prerequisite: CIS 2325. (Spring)

3319 Internship in CIS
Practical experience in CIS through a monitored work experience. Application must be made 60 days prior to registration. Prerequisites: minimum GPA of 3.0, 12 hours in CIS and approval of the Computer Information Systems coordinator required. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

3330 Programming Languages II
Continuation of Programming Languages I with an emphasis on object-oriented programming methodologies and advanced language features: vehicle language Visual Basic.NET. Cross-referenced with BINF 3330. Prerequisite: BINF 2230. (Fall)

3340 Windows Network Environment
Focus is on developing the skills required by system and network administrators who implement, manage and troubleshoot existing Microsoft network and server environments. Prerequisite: CIS 2340. (Spring)

3350 UNIX II
Focus is on system management and communication, the installation and maintenance of server software, network security and data integrity issues, installation and configuration of the kernel and related applications and utilities. Prerequisite: CIS 2350. (Fall)

3367 Introduction to Networks and Telecommunications
Basic telecommunications terminology and concepts. Introduction to voice and data networks, including technology, hardware, and software. Cross-referenced with BINF 3367. Prerequisites: BINF 2321 and BINF 2328. (Spring)

4310 Management of Technology
Introduction to tactical level management of information system resources. Topics covered include: facility management, planning and budgeting, help desk management and customer service. Prerequisites: BINF 2321 and 12 hours of upper division CIS courses or permission of the instructor. (Fall)

4340 Windows Security
An introduction to the field of computer and network security with an emphasis on the Microsoft Windows operating environment. Prerequisite: CIS 3340. (Fall)

4350 UNIX Security
An introduction to the field of computer and network security with an emphasis on the UNIX (Linux) operating environment. Prerequisite: CIS 3350. (Spring)

4368 Web Site Development
Design and development of professional-looking web sites for commercial and other purposes. Concepts of planning and design for electronic commerce. Programming in (X)HTML, Javascript, and PHP to integrate databases into dynamic pages. Fee. Prerequisite: CIS 2330 or BINF 2330. (Fall)

COMPUTER LITERACY (COMP)
[Program Description, page 89]

1301 Computer Literacy/Business Applications
This course is an introduction to basic microcomputer terminology and concepts. The student receives hands-on experience in file management techniques, Internet and email software, online library software, word-processing software, presentation software and spreadsheet software with an emphasis in business applications. This course meets the computer literacy requirement for business majors. (Fall, Spring)

2120 Computers in Education
This course focuses on terminology and hands-on experience in educational technologies and classroom computer programs. Fee

CULTURAL STUDIES (CLST)
[Program Description, page 92]

1310 Introduction to Cultural Studies
This course provides an overview of the principles and basic concepts central to
cultural studies. We will examine such topics as changing definitions of culture; challenges to hierarchies of cultural value; theoretical foundations of cultural studies; and social movements (feminism, critical race studies, post-colonialism, gender theory, etc.) This course will also attend to emergent contemporary concerns within the field such as the effects of globalization, techno-cultural studies, and more.

2320 Cultural Studies Method: Inquiry and Evidence
This course provides an overview of a
variety of methodologies utilized to examine literary texts, artistic forms, and discursive practices that reflect and produce a society’s culture. Students will examine historical and contemporary case studies from areas such as the visual arts, music, video, film, literature, religion, myth, ritual and theatre.

3325 Cultural Studies Theory
This course introduces students to a variety of theoretical approaches to the study of culture, including visual theory, literary theory and performance theory. Attention will be paid to the contexts in which these cultural representations are produced and in which they circulate. Students will investigate how visual, textual and performative discourses create and contest social borders, replicate cultures, and negotiate power dynamics. Students will examine case studies from the fine and performing arts, film, literary texts, advertising, etc.

3110/ 3115/ 3120 Cultural Studies Colloquium
This course provides an opportunity for students to synthesize the interdisciplinary nature of their course of studies. Students will work to apply the methods and theories of Cultural Studies to the CLST –approved electives they are taking. This is a one-hour course to be taken for three semesters.

4310 Senior Seminar
This course provides an opportunity for students to synthesize the interdisciplinary nature of their course of studies. By utilizing the methods and theories defined and developed in their previous course work, students will demonstrate mastery of concepts and skills acquired in their major.

4399 Selected Topics in Cultural Studies
This course will investigate an issue or topic of interest to the field of Cultural Studies. Topics may vary each semester.

DANCE (DANC)
[Program Description, page 95]

1186 Character/Jazz I
This course presents two dance forms. The first half of the semester will focus on character as a study of a dance style that blends folk dance and academic ballet steps. Then, jazz will be presented as a study of the musical comedy style on the beginning level. No prerequisite. Fee. (Spring)

1301 Ballet I (Level 1)
This course introduces students to
beginning level ballet technique. It involves barre and centre work with an emphasis on body placement and alignment. Emphasis is placed on vocabulary building with intent to create a system of interlocking movement concepts. No prerequisite. Taken as 1301, this course satisfies the Core Fine Arts area requirement. May be cross-referenced with PEHP 1115. Fee. (Fall, Spring)

1302 Ballet I (Level 2)
This course is a continuation of material
covered in Level 1, with greater emphasis placed on allegro and adagio centre work. Prerequisite: DANC 1301 or some prior dance training. Taken as 1302, this course satisfies the Core Fine Arts area requirement. Fee. (Fall, Spring)

1305 Social Dance I (Level 1)
This class is an introduction to four major ballroom dances: Waltz, Foxtrot,
Cha-Cha, Rumba, and East Coast Swing. Steps, style, and etiquette will be emphasized. May be taken after Level 2. No prerequisite. Taken as 1305, this course satisfies the Core Fine Arts area requirement. Fee. May be cross-referenced with PEHP 1145. (Fall, Spring)

1306 Social Dance I (Level 2)
This class is an introduction to the Ballroom Dances: Tango, Viennese Waltz, West Coast Swing, and Mambo. Learning to be comfortable on the social dance floor. May be taken before Level 1. No prerequisite. Taken as 1306, this course satisfies the Core Fine Arts area requirement. Fee. (Spring)

1180 Country Western Dance I
This course introduces students to the basics to some of the more popular steps in Two Step, Country Swing, and Waltz. May be cross-referenced with PEHP 1146. No prerequisite. Fee. (Fall or Spring)

1183 Basic Rhythms
This course involves rigorous drill to increase stamina and the capacity for endurance; to develop physical coordination and naturalness; to coordinate movement and increase flexibility and strength; to develop focus, balance, and confidence; and to explore inner rhythms, instincts, and physical potential. For both men and women. No prerequisite. May be cross-referenced with PEHP 1116. Fee. (Fall, Spring)

2221 Ballet II (Level 1)
This course presents intermediate level
ballet technique, including continued and expanded study and practice of classical ballet skills and technique. Prerequisites: DANC 1101 or 1301, and DANC 1102 or 1302 or permission of the instructor. Fee. (Fall, Spring)

2222 Ballet II (Level 2)
This course continues the study of Intermediate level ballet technique. Prerequisite: DANC 2221 or permission of the instructor. Fee. (Spring)

2245 Social Dance II
This course continues student exploration of social dance steps and technique in Waltz, Foxtrot, Cha-Cha, Rumba, and East Coast Swing. Additional dances such as Mambo, Bolero, Tango and Merengue may also be covered if time permits. Prerequisite: DANC 1105 or DANC 1106 or permission of the instructor. Fee. (various)

2280 Country Western Dance II
This course continues the study of steps and styling in Two Step, Country Swing, and Waltz. Learning additional dances Polka and Cha-Cha. Prerequisite: DANC 1180. (various)


3221 Ballet III
This course is a synthesis of Intermediate/ Advanced level ballet technique. Fee. Prerequisite: DANC 2222 or permission of the instructor. (various)

3321 Performance Techniques
This course prepares students to create original works in various styles of choreography involving laboratory in dance design and construction. Prerequisite: DANC 2222, DANC 2246, or DANC 2222, and DANC 2245 or DANC 2280. Fee. (various)

DIMENSIONS OF WELLNESS (DWHP)

1200 Dimensions of Wellness
This course is designed to help students develop an appreciation for and commitment to a wellness lifestyle. The course emphasis is placed on helping students develop self-care abilities related to spiritual, physical, emotional, intellectual, social, and working wellness. Lab course: meets two clock hours for every credit hour. Students participate in two in-class aerobic workouts per week.

3200 Dimensions of Wellness Bridge
Normally, transfer and adult returning students satisfy Core requirements by taking this course, and one hour of physical education activity courses. Students analyze personal lifestyle and plan for wellness along six dimensions: spiritual, physical, intellectual, social, emotional, and occupational. It includes one in-class aerobic activity per week (Every semester).

3300 Dimensions of Wellness Bridge (ADCaP format)
In this course the emphasis is placed on helping students develop self-responsibility for the spiritual, physical, emotional, intellectual, social, and occupational dimensions of wellness. This course requires the student to participate in two in-class aerobic workouts per week and the integration of lifetime sports and/or activities (as needed).

EARTH SCIENCE (EASC)
[See GEOLOGY (GEOL), page 179]

EDUCATION (EDUC)
[Program Description, page 140]

2301 American Sign Language and Deaf Culture I
Acquisition of the language of signs. The student will develop an appreciation and knowledge of the culture that has developed and uses this type of communication. Fee. (Fall)

2302 American Sign Language and Deaf Culture II
Continuation of EDUC 2301, which is the prerequisite. Fee. (Spring)

2305 Foundations of Education
This course assists students in assessing their interest in becoming a teacher, acquaints them with responsibilities of teaching, explores options in teaching positions, and introduces the Teacher Education Program at UIW. An examination of the historical, philosophical, theoretical, legal, cultural, and ethical bases of current United States educational systems will be included. This course will also be infused with three Catholic Social Teaching themes: the dignity of the human person, community and the common good, and rights and responsibilities. (Fall, Spring)

2361 Families, Schools, and Communities
The interactive role of family, school, and community in the process of education is the focus of this course. Topics include: establishing and maintaining strong school-home relationships, working with parents and primary caregivers to address young children’s developmental needs, and parent-teacher relationships with the school. This course is recommended for early childhood pre-service teachers in the junior year and is a required course in the early childhood certification sequence. (Fall, Spring)

2380 Introduction to Intercultural Communication
This course provides an introduction to the field of intercultural communication, enhances the development of intercultural competence (in the participants and indirectly in their students), and explores implications and applications for the teaching and learning of ESL. The course examines theoretical perspectives of language, culture, and worldview; communicative competence, intercultural contact; issues of diversity and commonalities among human beings; implications and applications for the classroom situation and oneself as a language teacher. (As needed)

3300 The Survey of Children in Diverse and Inclusive Settings
This course will introduce the student to laws concerning the rights and responsibilities involved in teaching children with special needs; to the characteristics of various categories of special needs; to specific strategies for adapting the physical and social environment to best meet the needs of each child; to curricular and instructional modifications appropriate for each child; to methods of communicating with families and assisting families in identifying community support services. (Fall, Spring)

3305: Law for Early Childhood Administrators
An in-depth examination of current legal bases and practices for organizing and conducting a human service organization, such as a private school, child care center, Head Start Agency, resource and referral organization or family support agency. This course emphasizes court cases, legal liability, legal issues involved in insurance, legal and ethical issues, child abuse, due process, and the rights of children. (As needed)

3310: Finance for Early Childhood Program Administrators
The analysis and application of principles of finance and organization of business management of human service organizations including program budgets, how the budget affects policy, the elements of a quality in a program for children, the design of salary schedules and reward systems, cost analysis, financial tools to monitor and control expenditures, concepts of total quality management and marketing and sources of funds for early childhood programs. (As needed)

3315 Leadership/Human Side of Management
This course provides the learner the knowledge and skills necessary to manage a human service organization such as a child care center, Head Start, private school, resource and referral organization or family support agency in diverse settings. (As needed)

3316 Foundations of Language and Literacy
This course focuses on models and processes of reading, word recognition processes, vocabulary development, various comprehension strategies, and study skills This is the introductory course in reading and is a prerequisite to all other reading courses. This course is required by all interdisciplinary studies majors and by all students seeking a reading minor. It may not be repeated for credit. (Fall, Spring)

3317 Languages and Literacy Assessment
This course develops informal, individual, and group assessment procedures including activities and strategies for reading success. Prerequisite: EDUC 3316. (Fall, Spring)


3320: Facilities Operations
Survey of models, policies, and procedures for the effective development, planning, use, and management of early childhood facilities. This course will emphasize federal, state, and local regulatory standards for early childhood program facilities and operations. (As needed)

3340 Technology in Education
This course includes the introduction of preservice teachers to basic software applications used in K-12 classrooms, and methods of integration with current curriculum. Strategies for effective implementation in the one computer classroom and in a lab setting will be demonstrated. The use of the computer as a teacher tool will be addressed. (Fall, Spring) Prerequisite: Admission into Teacher Education.

3350 Emergent Literacy
This course examines literacy learning from an emergent perspective, acknowledging the child’s previous literacy experiences as a foundation for further literacy development in the classroom. Prerequisites: EDUC 3316. (Fall, Spring)

3351 Reading, Writing, and Study
Skills in the Content Areas Application of current theory and practice in the areas of reading, writing, and study skills in content areas of both elementary and secondary schools. Vocabulary development, text structure, comprehension strategies, and interactive instructional methods are included. Prerequisites: EDUC 3316 (Fall, Spring)

3352 Practicum in Reading
Guidance in applying theory and methodology. Work on specific lesson plans for teaching word recognition, comprehension with emphasis on interpretive skills, and critical and creative responding. Lessons designed by class members are taught with feedback in the practicum. Prerequisites: EDUC 3316 and 3317 (Individually arranged)


3360 Early Childhood/Kindergarten Curriculum
Developmentally appropriate practices in early childhood curriculum (ages 3-8) and integrating the language arts, mathematics, science, health, fine arts, and social studies. The role of the teacher and the learning environment will also be discussed. (As needed)

3364 History and Philosophy of Early Childhood Education
Students in this course will experience a study of the pertinent learning theories of early childhood: Piaget, Vygotsky, Montessori, the Reggio Emilia Approach, Multiple Intelligences, etc. The concept of developmentally appropriate practice will be studied. (Fall)

3370 Teaching Diverse Populations
Examination of divergent communities and education through cultural categories. This course will utilize current research and innovative strategies to address the needs of students from diverse populations. Prerequisites: EDUC 3375 (Spring)

3373 Learning Theories
Introduces the various theories of Human learning: behaviorist, cognitive, social, and constructivist. This course will emphasize cognitive processes but not ignore other means in which we process information, especially that which is relative to diverse and culturally distinct populations. The field of learning is ever dynamic and changing and will influence course content. Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education (Fall)

3375 Teaching the Young Child I
Developmentally appropriate curriculum practices in early childhood education (NK-4th Grade), classroom teaching skills, management and guidance techniques; models of teaching, the lesson planning process, and instructional planning for both small and large groups. Supervised and directed participation in an EC-4 school setting will be a major component. Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education (Fall)

3377 Teaching the Young Child II
An examination of the total early childhood (NK-4th Grade) classroom, best practice and the variety of approaches to implementing best practice including providing choices and integrating the curriculum. Supervised and directed participation in an EC-4 school setting will be a major component. Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education and EDUC 3375 (Spring)

3379 Instruction and Assessment
Provides opportunities for the analysis, interpretation and application of a variety of assessment procedures. Emphasis on the interrelationship of curriculum, instruction, and assessment in classroom situations. Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education and EDUC 3375 (Spring)

3380 Pedagogy for the Secondary and Middle School
This course is a professional development course leading to Texas secondary certification (grades 8-12), middle level certification (grades 4-8) or all level certification (K-grade 12). This course, designed for prospective teachers, encompasses various categories of knowledge related to professional skills, values, and decision-making. Supervised and directed participation in secondary school settings will be a major component. Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education (Fall)

3383 Integrative Pedagogy for the Secondary and Middle School
This course is a professional development course leading to Texas secondary certification (grades 8-12), middle level certification (grades 4-8) or all level certification (K-grade 12). This course, designed for prospective teachers, will include curricular unit development and management, technology integration, teaming, and thematic unit development, managing middle and secondary school extracurricular activities and maintaining effective faculty and administrative relationships, community involvement and professional responsibilities. Supervised and direct participation in a middle or secondary school setting will be a major component. Prerequisites: EDUC 3383 (Spring)

4305 Student Apprenticeship/Internship Seminar
This course is the last course in the Professional Development Sequence and is required for Texas teacher certification. This course is designed to examine the issues and problems faced in the student apprenticeship/internship. Examination, analysis, and practice of the Texas Examination of Educator Standards (TExES) (Fall, Spring)

4321 Special Classroom and Behavior Management
Major approaches to behavior management and to meeting the needs of students with emotional, social, and behavior problems in a variety of settings; special attention to establishing supportive relationships with significant individuals in the learner’s various environments and communities. 15 hours of practicum required. (As needed)

4323 Testing for Teaching
Curriculum based assessment. Alternatives for assessing status in academic subjects and adaptive functioning and intervention strategies for remediation of academic and adaptive functioning. Norm. Referenced and informal testing. (As needed)

4324 Seminar in Specific Learning Problems
Study of individuals identified as learning disabled, history of the field, various intervention approaches and service delivery models. 15 hours of practicum experience required. (As needed)

4325 Vocational Training and Independent Living
Alternatives for post-secondary vocational and living arrangements are researched. Particular attention is given to development of Individual Transition Plans and the cooperative arrangements between schools and other agencies. Thirty-hour practicum in a rehabilitation setting is required. (As needed)

4326 Vocational Assessment and Rehabilitation
Research into the available assessment instruments for determining vocational intervention and programming. Special consideration to the application of the assessment data in intervention. (As needed)

4310 Literacy Across the Curriculum
This course presents a transactional view of reading and addresses methods content area teachers can use to enhance the reading abilities of their students. It emphasizes the important role content area teachers play in helping students become active readers who link the words on a page with their growing knowledge of a subject.

4345 Creative Play and Play Environments
This course is an introduction to the study of the role of play and creative expression through the visual arts, music, creative drama and other play activities. Theoretical frameworks of play, the characteristics of play, the importance of play, the stages of social and cognitive play, types of playgrounds, outdoor environments for children of different ages and with diverse needs, play materials, and learner-centered play will be studied. This course part of the early childhood sequence for pre-service teachers. It cannot be repeated for credit. (Fall)

4371 Survey of Exceptionalities
The types and characteristics of potentially handicapping conditions including causative factors, models of service delivery, investigation of all federal and state laws and regulations affecting special education. (As needed)

4372 Cognitive Structures and Language Development
A survey of major cognitive and behaviorist theories of learning, Particular emphasis on applications to the language, cognitive and social development of children and youth with disabilities and to the development of a second language. This course cannot be repeated for credit. (Spring)

4373 Methods and Materials for Teaching Learners with Disabilities
Models and approaches to meeting the needs of students with handicaps in a variety of instructional settings; specific instructional methods and techniques; locating, evaluating, selecting and/or creating/adapting instructional materials and technology. 15 hours of practicum required. (As needed)

4380 TESOL Practicum
This course provides guidance in applying theory and methodology as well as observation in order to gain insights to the needs of second language learners and to develop strategies to facilitate their learning. This will be accomplished through fieldwork, regular class meetings, and journals. Prerequisites: ENGL 2383 and 4360. (As needed)

4605 Student Apprenticeship/Internship
This course is the last course in the Professional Development Sequence and is required for Texas teacher certification. It requires a full time commitment by the prospective teacher during the normal school day (7:30 AM-4:00 PM) and takes place ON SITE in a school assigned by the Field Placement Coordinator and the Director of Teacher Education. Because of the scheduling differences between Texas school calendars and the UIW calendar, students will be required to begin/end this course at times not coinciding with the UIW schedule. Students must attend teacher in-service meetings, faculty meetings, and one school district board meeting during the semester, as well as all other required meetings and/or extracurricular events required by the mentor teacher or the school administration. (Fall, Spring)

ENGINEERING (ENGR)
[Program Description, page 146]

1201 Introduction to Engineering
This seminar course introduces both the engineering program at Incarnate Word and the engineering profession by assigning group projects, inviting guest lecturers, and covering engineering topics in decision analysis and professionalism. Prerequisite: MATH 1304

1202 Engineering Design
A continuation of Introduction to Engineering. This course involves project design using AutoCAD drawings and technical writing. Prerequisite: ENGR 1201 and 1310, or permission of the instructor.

1310 Engineering Graphics
The first level course for computer drafting and design; two- and three-dimensional modeling. No prerequisite.

3350 Statics and Dynamics
Students will study vector algebra, force systems, and free body diagrams; engineering applications of equilibrium, centroids, and moments of inertia; kinematics and kinetics of particles and plane rigid bodies, work and energy, impulse and momentum, and engineering applications. Prerequisite: PHYS 2305

3455 Strength of Materials
This course includes both lecture and lab experiences. Students study materials (metals, ceramics, polymers, composites, adhesives, etc.) and the effects of forces on materials at a molecular level, analysis of stress and strain, bending, torsion, and elasticity. Prerequisite: ENGR 3350

3460 Electronic Circuitry
This course includes both lecture and lab experiences. Students study the principles of electrical networks, electronic circuits, and of experimental linear circuit analysis. Prerequisite: PHYS 2306

4375 Thermodynamics
Students study heat, work, the kinetic theory of gases, equations of state, thermodynamic systems, the laws of thermodynamics, reversible and irreversible processes, the conservation of energy, and basic thermodynamic cycles. Prerequisite: PHYS 2305

4399 Special Topics In Engineering
This course will cover a variety of engineering topics that will change from semester to semester. Topics may include studies of construction, design, soils, structures, electronics, surveying, environment, conservation, or other current areas of interest in engineering

4470 Fluid Mechanics
This course includes both lecture and lab experiences. Students study fluid properties, fluid statics, energy and momentum, integral and differential analysis of fluid flow, boundary layers, viscous laminar and turbulent flow in conduits, dimensional analysis, drag and lift. Prerequisite: ENGR 3350, MATH 2314

4490 Senior Project
A capstone course combining management and engineering experience. An original research project is undertaken, and there is a public presentation at the end of the semester. Permission of advisor required.

ENGLISH (ENGL)
[Program Description, page 96]

1311 Composition I
Part of the UIW Core Curriculum, this is a writing-intensive course focusing on numerous modes to develop main ideas. This course introduces students to creative, academic, and business writing and communication, emphasizing grammar and syntax, with a view to increasing expository writing skills and critical thinking ability. This course must be completed with a minimum grade of C. Prerequisite: Meet the UIW Academic Literacy requirements. (Every semester)

1312 Composition II
Part of the UIW Core Curriculum, this course is writing-intensive, focusing on diverse themes and stressing argumentative and persuasive writing. Special emphasis is placed on research skills and critical thinking ability. This course must be completed with a minimum grade of C. Prerequisite: ENGL 1311. (Every semester)

2310 World Literature Studies
Part of the UIW Core Curriculum, this course includes close reading and discussion of texts of all kinds from a wide range of periods and societies to reveal the diversity of literature as a means of cultural statement. Prerequisites: ENGL 1311, 1312.This course may be taken with 1312. (Every semester)

2330 Traditional Grammar
Part of the Language Arts and Linguistics branch of the UIW English Program, this course presents an overview of the grammatical structure of the English Language for native and non-native speakers. Students will study the traditional names for parts of speech and traditional terms for grammatical structure in English, and examine sentence structure analytically. The course will examine structure at both sentence and discourse level. Students will be required to recognize and produce grammatically acceptable writing in English. (Fall)

2360 Literary Theory
Part of the Literary Studies and Criticism branch of the UIW English Program, this study of literary theory engages the student in several critical approaches to texts. Prerequisites: ENGL 1311, 1312. This course may be taken with ENGL 2310. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective. (Fall and Spring)

2365 Professional and Technical Communication
Part of the Rhetoric and Professional Writing branch of the UIW English Program, this course is a survey of professional and technical writing, with emphasis on writing to various audiences; types of communication include job applications, reports, instructions, proposals, and other communications for business and industry. Prerequisites: ENGL 1311 and 1312. (Fall and Spring)

2383 Introduction to General Linguistics
Part of the Language Arts and Linguistics branch of the UIW English Program, this course is a study of the basic principles of language analysis and description, with application to English and other languages. It includes discussion of language acquisition, the physiology of language ability, the concept of standard language, and the implications of bilingualism and bi-dialectism in education and for society. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective. Prerequisites: ENGL 1311, 1312. This course may be taken with ENGL 2310. (Fall)

2330 Traditional Grammar
Part of the Language Arts and Linguistics branch of the UIW English Program, this course presents an overview of the grammatical structure of the English Language for native and non-native speakers. Students will study the traditional names for parts of speech and traditional terms for grammatical structure in English, and examine sentence structure analytically. The course will examine structure at both sentence and discourse level. Students will be required to recognize and produce grammatically acceptable writing in English. (Fall)

3310 English Literature Survey
Part of the Literary Studies and Criticism branch of the UIW English Program, this introductory survey of British Literature situates the study of literary production within a cultural and historical context. The course will examine the motifs of major authors and works as well as explore the impact of non-canonical authors and works. Prerequisites: ENGL 1311, 1312, and 2310.This course may be taken with ENGL 2360. (Fall)

3320 American Literature Survey
Part of the Literary Studies and Criticism branch of the UIW English Program, this course is an analytical survey of major and lesser-known writers from the precolonial period to the present. The course may emphasize certain periods and include writers from countries other than the United States. Prerequisites: ENGL 1311, 1312, and 2310. This course may be taken with ENGL 2360. (Spring)

3330 Genre Studies
Part of the Literary Studies and Criticism branch of the UIW English Program, this course is a study of critical theory and practice of representative examples from the major literary genres, with an emphasis on one of them (e.g. the novel, drama, short fiction, the epic, etc.). This course may be repeated for credit when the topic varies. Prerequisites: ENGL 1311, 1312, and 2310. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective. (Spring, Summer, alternate years)

3355 Introduction to Rhetorical Theory
Part of the Rhetoric and Professional Writing branch of the UIW English Program, this course is a historical introduction to rhetorical theory with emphasis on application of rhetoric to socio-cultural issues, persuasion, and composition learning. Prerequisites: ENGL 1311, 1312, and 2310. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective. (Fall)

3365 Editing and Publishing
Part of the Rhetoric and Professional Writing branch of the UIW English Program, this study of the academic Literary periodical involves students in the editing, production, and distribution of the University’s literary journal, Quirk. Prerequisites: ENGL 1311, 1312. This course may be taken with ENGL 2310. (Spring)

3375 Creative Writing
Part of the Rhetoric and Professional Writing branch of the UIW English Program, this workshop in the art of writing includes sampling contemporary literature, analyzing various genres, and the production and performance of original work. This course may be repeated for credit when the genre varies. Prerequisites: ENGL 1311, 1312, and 2310. (Fall)

3385 Integrated Language Arts
Part of the Language Arts and Linguistics branch of the UIW English Program, this study of language development and acquisition explores the content, methodologies and materials associated with teaching writing, reading, speaking, listening, and children’s literature. Course assignments may include a practicum requirement. Prerequisites: ENGL 1311, 1312, and 2310. (Fall, Spring)

4301 Senior Seminar
The capstone course for undergraduate English majors, this course is designed to be taken in the student’s senior year and involves the discussion and application of various critical methodologies; this course culminates in the writing of the senior thesis. Prerequisites: ENGL 1311, 1312, 2310, 2360, and a minimum of 12 hours of additional English courses. (Spring)

4310 Writing for the Computer Industry
Part of the Rhetoric and Professional Writing branch of the UIW English Program, this course is an introduction to the most common types of computer writing - online and written instructions, WebPages, and product testing. This course is useful for anyone interested in the computer industry, especially writers. Prerequisites: ENGL 1311, 1312, and 2365. Basic computer literacy is strongly recommended. (Spring)

4320 Period Studies
Part of the Literary Studies and Criticism branch of the UIW English Program, this course examines the interplay of literary texts, literary theory and criticism, authors, historical culture, and events within a specific historic time-frame. Rather than a broad sweep, or a wide lens, this course will approach the subject through the close-up. This course may be repeated for credit when the topic varies. Prerequisites: ENGL 1311, 1312, 2310, and 2360. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective. (Summer, Spring, alternate years)

4330 Internship
In this course, students earn academic credit through practical experience involving writing, editing, or related tasks. Students will work part-time in a professional setting under the guidance of a resident supervisor. 140-160 hours of work required. Prerequisites: ENGL 1311, 1312, and 2365 or 3365. (As needed)

4340 Major Authors
Part of the Literary Studies and Criticism branch of the UIW English Program, this course involves a detailed examination of an important writer. This course may be repeated for credit when the topic varies. When Shakespeare is the author, may be cross listed with THAR 4385 Shakespeare. Prerequisites: ENGL 1311, 1312, and 2310. (Spring, Summer, alternate years)

4350 Literary Movements
Part of the Literary Studies and Criticism branch of the UIW English Program, this course involves a detailed examination of a major literary movement. This course may be repeated for credit when the topic varies. Prerequisites: ENGL 1311, 1312, and 2310. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective. (Summer, Spring, alternate years)

4360 Applied Linguistics
Part of the Language Arts and Linguistics branch of the UIW English Program, this course is a close and complex examination of the structures and systems of language -- words, sounds, and complete sentences -- and their application to language development, diversity, acquisition, and teaching. Prerequisites: ENGL 1311, 1312, 2310, And 2383. (Spring, alternate years)

4367 Literature for Children and Young Adults
Part of the Language Arts and Linguistics branch of the UIW English Program, this course is an exploration of literature written for younger readers, including research in the development of reading interest and the study of selected books, films, and computer software reflecting both the language and culture. Prerequisites: ENGL 1311, 1312, and 2310. (Spring, Summer)

4370 Trends in Linguistics Studies
Part of the Language Arts and Linguistics branch of the UIW English Program, this course examines current significant research in the areas of linguistics: phonetics and phonology, syntax, semantics, language acquisition, psycholinguistics, sociolinguistics, and dialectology. This course may be repeated for credit when the topic varies. Prerequisites: ENGL 1311, 1312, 2310, and 2383. (Spring, alternate years)

4630 Internship
This course is the same as 4330 but involves 280-330 hours of work at the professional location. Prerequisites: ENGL 1311, 1312, and 2365 or 3365. (As needed)

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE (ENSC)
[Program Description, page 177]

1410 Environmental Science and Laboratory
Environmental Science is an integrated lecture and laboratory course involving the study of the physical and biological systems of the Earth, their complex connections and patterns, and human interactions with the environment. The course includes an examination of the challenges of preserving the productivity and diversity of biological systems for the continued maintenance of life on Earth. Fee.

2315 Environmental Chemistry
This course examines inorganic, organic, physical, and biochemical principles related to environmental chemistry. Topics include photochemical smog, water and soil pollutants, and environmental ethics. Prerequisite: CHEM 1301, 1101, 1302, 1102. Fee.

2410 Stream Hydrology and Ecology and Laboratory
This introductory course covers a broad range of topics that include the hydrologic cycle, watershed hydrology, runoff generation, precipitation, evapo- transpiration, infiltration, stream processes, and interactions of plants and animals within the stream environment. Case studies, short field trips, and laboratories foster an understanding of hydrological and ecological concepts, applications, and principles. Prerequisite: BIOL 1401, 1402. Fee.

3410 Soil Conservation and Laboratory
This course is a study of the social, environmental and economic value of soil, and the processes related to soil degradation. It includes an examination of the basic principles of soil management and soil conservation and associated use of best management practices, and a study of the technological advances that can be utilized to keep our soil resources sustainable. Prerequisite: BIOL 1401, 1402. Fee.

3445 Environmental Toxicology and Laboratory
This course studies the effects of pollution on the environment. It includes a laboratory experience. Prerequisite: BIOL 1401, 1402, 6 semester hours of chemistry. Fee. (Spring, odd years)

4203 Environmental Chemistry Laboratory
This course applies the diverse methods of chemical analysis to study the composition of water, soil, and atmosphere. Particular attention is paid to the movement and fate of pollutants in our biosphere. A limited scope field study will be performed to familiarize the students with the sampling and analysis of environmental samples. Prerequisite: CHEM 3311, 3421, 3421 ENSC 4302, 4303. Fee.

4301 Aquatic Environmental Chemistry
This course provides environmental understanding of the principles of aquatic chemistry and equilibria as they apply to environmental systems including natural waters, wastewater and treated waters. Prerequisite: CHEM 3311, 3111, 3421. Fee.

4302 Atmospheric Environmental Chemistry
This course investigates the structure and chemical composition of, and the chemical processes occurring in the Earth’s atmosphere, including interactions with solar radiation, the stratospheric ozone layer, greenhouse effect, changes in the oxidation capacity of the troposphere, photochemical smog and acid rain. Prerequisite: CHEM 3311, 3111, 3421. Fee.

4305 Environmental Science Internship
Students participate in on-the-job training at local environmental companies or governmental agencies approved by the program director. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor and junior or senior standing in the Environmental Science program. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

4315 Environmental Science Research
Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in Biology is a computer assemblage that has the capability to create a comprehensive database with many layers of information. The assemblage provides visualization of spatial patterns by cross-referencing different layers of information. This course will concentrate on GIS applications in Biology. Prerequisite: BIOL 1401, 1402. Cross-listed with BIOL 4415. Fee.

4415 Geographic Information Systems in Biology
Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in Biology is a computer assemblage that has the capability to create a comprehensive database with many layers of information. The assemblage provides visualization of spatial patterns by cross-referencing different layers of information. This course will concentrate on GIS application in Biology. Prerequisite: BIOL 1401, 1402. Cross-listed with BIOL 4415. Fee.

4460 Research in Water Quality
This course includes applied biological and hydrological studies of the stream and associated floodplain environment including plant and macroinvertebrate survey, stream flow analysis, water chemistry, and applications of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for accurate mapping and detailed field data recording. Prerequisite: Senior level Biology, Chemistry, Environmental Science majors. Other students must have permission of the instructor. Fee.

4499 Independent Study in Environmental Science
This course includes a specific research project on a biology or chemistry topic with approval from the student’s advisor. Prerequisite: Senior level Biology, Chemistry, Environmental Science majors. Other students must have permission of the instructor. Fee.

FASHION MANAGEMENT (FMGT)
[Program Description, page 164]

1122 Apparel Construction II
Application of advanced construction techniques. Fee. Prerequisites: FMGT 1121, 1332. (Spring)

1331 Psychology of Clothing
Dimensions of individuality are explored in regard to cultural, psychological, and sociological influences on dress; the physical aspects of appearance, elements and principles of clothing design, and consumer information are addressed. (Spring)

1432 Construction Details
A study of clothing silhouettes, advanced construction techniques, and an introduction to industrial machinery. Includes application of design elements and construction techniques. Fee. (Fall)

2121 Intermediate Clothing
Selection, construction, and care of clothing as related to human development. Fee. Prerequisites: FMGT 1122, 1432. (Fall)

2341 Textiles
An introduction to textiles, providing a broad view of the production and utilization of fabrics with emphasis on application and serviceability. Fee. (Fall)

2342 Advanced Textiles
Continuation of 2341; fibers and fabrics are studied in depth through laboratory testing. Fee. Prerequisite: FMGT 2341. (Spring)

3321 Fashion Illustration I
Drawing to interpret the attitude of the fashion figure through various illustration techniques in order to affect exciting visual presentation. Fee. (Fall)

3322 Fashion Illustration II
A continuation of the study and practice of techniques of illustrating fashion figures. Emphasis on portfolio presentation. Fee. (Spring)

3325 Costume History
See THAR 4342.

3328 Tailoring
Solving special problems by applying advanced techniques in tailored construction of apparel. Fee. Prerequisites: FMGT 1122, 1432. (Fall)

3331 Pattern Engineering I
Study and application of basic principles and techniques of flat pattern development. Fee. Prerequisites: FMGT 1122, 1432. (Fall, Spring)

3332 Pattern Engineering II
Study and application of intermediate techniques of flat pattern development in the creation of design ideas. Fee. Prerequisite: FMGT 3331. (Spring)

3344 Apparel Recover and Resale
This course examines the steps and procedures in reclaiming and recycling used clothing for resale. It is intended for students interested in jobs in non-profit organizations, which derive revenue from thrift stores, students, interested in vintage clothing for the stage or in museums, and for students interested din reclaiming clothing for resale or profit. (Fall)

4132 CAD for Fashion Design
Training in the use of CAD Computer system in fabric design and illustration. Fee. (Fall, Spring)

4229 Professional Practice/Internship
Supervised work experience in an approved, related work environment. Prerequisites: 9 hours in Fashion Design at the 3000 level and permission of instructor. (Spring)

4388 Internship in Non-Profit Management:
see NUTR 4388

4314 Special Problems in Clothing
Individualized study of problems in fashion design techniques, including fabric selection, accessorization, and creative problem solving. Fee. Prerequisites: FMGT 1122, 1432, 2121, 3328, and permission of instructor.

4324 Fabric Design
Graphic design emphasizing the creative and technical aspects of fabric manipulation. Fee. (Fall)

4325 Draping
Principles of apparel design through the medium of draping; application of design principles to the development of ideas for apparel. Fee. Prerequisites: FMGT 1122, 1432, or permission of instructor. (Fall)

4330 Seasonal Collections
Creative experience in the research, design, development, and execution of a collection of garments; exhibition and expansion of advanced techniques in flat pattern and draping. Fee. Prerequisites: FMGT 1122, 1432, 3321, 3322, 3331, 3332, and Senior standing, or permission of instructor. (Spring)

4331 Fashion Show Production
Experience in all aspects of fashion show production, including staging, lighting, sound, model selection, publicity, etc., in a variety of settings. Requires participation in on-campus and off campus fashion shows. Fee. Also open to Fashion Merchandising majors. (Spring)

34199 Pre-Seasonal Collections
Preparation for Seasonal Collection. Prerequisite: FMGT 1122, 1432, 2121, 3321, 3322,3328, 3331, 3332, 4325, (Fall)

FASHION MERCHANDISING (FMER)
[Program Description, page 167]

2364 Color Theory
See INTD 2364

2381 Fashion Merchandising
Principles for the successful merchandising of fashion goods. Reviews industry segmentation, activities, operations, and practices in the fashion industry. (Fall)

2383 Visual Merchandising
Study and application of display principles related to merchandising. (Spring)

3382 Store Operations
A review of retail operations at the department and specialty store levels; merchandising functions, purchasing practices and techniques; retail advertising and sales promotion strategies. Extensive use of the case study method as a means of arriving at rational decision-making within the merchandising environment. Prerequisite: FMER 2381. (Fall)

3383 Mathematics for Retail Buying
In-depth study of the numbers associated with merchandising and store operations: retail method of inventory, operating statements, retail pricing and re-pricing of merchandise, invoice mathematics, dollar planning and control, and review of reports utilized for merchandising and dollar control. (Spring)

4229 Professional Practice/Internship
Supervised work experience in an approved, related work environment. Prerequisites: 9 hours in Fashion Design at the 3000 level and permission of instructor. (Spring)

4380 Textiles and Apparel in the International Economy
Study of foreign textile and apparel manufacturing and its impact on domestic manufacturers and retailers; import program development, tariffs, quotas, financing, transportation, and other related aspects. (Spring)

4382 Professional Practice: Theory
Process of developing a design portfolio collection for a career in fashion design, or other career options in the fashion industry. A variety of interview techniques and resume/portfolio styles will be discussed. Prerequisites: FMGT 3321 or FMER 2381. (Fall)

4392 Fashion Tour
Designed to broaden the scope of experience and understanding of the heritage of fashion. Opportunity to observe historic museums, cultural heritage, habits, dress, and apparel arts in the markets of New York, California, Europe, and the Orient. Open to non-majors. Fee.

FOREIGN LANGUAGES

1311, 1312 Elementary Foreign Language
This course introduces students to the fundamentals of a foreign language with emphasis on developing listening, comprehension, and speaking skills. It includes activities for developing abilities in speaking, listening, reading, and writing. 3 class hours. Individual laboratory. (1311 Fall, 1312 Spring)

2311, 2312 Intermediate Foreign Language
This course provides increased practice in oral communication, with emphasis on discussion and writing about cultural and literary readings. It includes a review of grammar and usage. 3 class hours. Individual laboratory. Prerequisite: Elementary Foreign Language 1311-1312 or equivalent. (2311 Fall, 2312 Spring)

GEOGRAPHY (GEOG)

3311 Cultural Geography
World geography and related topics, including population demographics, migration, languages, religions, customs, cultural diffusion, politics, and selected topics. Intended primarily for education majors. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective.

3312 Geography and Ethnic Groups of Texas and the Southwest
Migration and settlement of ethnic and cultural groups in Texas and the Southwest United States. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective.

GEOLOGY (GEOL)
[Program Description, page 179]

1311 World Geography
World Geography is the study of the physical, cultural, political, and economic characteristics of the world’s geographic regions, their spatial relationships, and how these geographic regions interact with each other. Current and historical case studies are examined to study these relationships.

1321 Physical Geography
Physical Geography is a study of the spatial aspects of the physical elements and processes that make up the environment that includes air, water, weather and climate, landforms, soils, animals, and plants of the Earth. Students will examine and analyze the components of the physical environment and how they are interconnected with each other

1401 Physical Geology
This course is a study of the physical processes that shape and modify the Earth’s surface, the processes that operate within the Earth, the origin and nature of minerals and rocks, and concepts of plate tectonics. Occasional field trips will be arranged. Fee. (Fall)

1402 Historical Geology
This course is a study of the geologic history of the Earth based on the rock and fossil record. Course includes a detailed study of the origin and evolution of life on Earth. Occasional field trips will be arranged. Fee. (Spring)

1415 Astronomy
This course is an integrated lecture and laboratory survey of astronomy that includes the history of astronomy, telescopes, celestial mechanics, time and the seasons, the Earth’s Moon, the Sun and the planets, the nature and origin of stars, stellar evolution, the origin and nature of the Milky Way galaxy, types of and nature of nebula, the nature of star clusters, the nature and origin of galaxies, and cosmology. Fee. (Spring)

1420 Oceanography
This course presents geological, physical, chemical, and biological studies of the Earth’s oceans. Course includes a study of the origin and continuing evolution of the ocean basins, air-sea and land-sea interactions, and life in the oceans. Fee. (Fall)

3410 Geohydrology
This course studies the occurrence, movement, and water chemistry of groundwater. Course includes a study of the influence of the geologic environment on mass transport of chemical systems, hydraulic properties of geologic materials, groundwater flow modeling, and evaluation of groundwater resources. Prerequisite: GEOL 1401, 1402, or equivalent courses. (Fall, odd-numbered years)

3450 Environmental Geology
This course presents applied geological studies of interactions between people and the Earth’s physical environment. Lecture and laboratory topics include evaluation of natural hazards, land-use planning, environmental impact analysis, and assessment of material resources of the Earth. Prerequisite: GEOL 1401. Fee. (Fall, even-numbered years)

3460 Geomorphology
This course is a study of the origin and evolution of landforms on the Earth’s surface, the description and analysis of landforms, and the physiography of continental and ocean landforms. Course also includes topographic map, aerial photograph, and satellite photograph interpretation. Prerequisite: GEOL 1401. Fee. (Spring, even-numbered years)

HISTORY (HIST)
[Program Description, page 99]

1311 World History, Part I
This course surveys major themes in the settlement by humans in the physical environment from Prehistory. The main emphasis will be on the complex interaction between human history and the environment as early societies develop. Special attention will be paid to the technology that humans develop to control the world around them. Fulfills CORE requirement. (Fall)

1312 World History, Part II
This course surveys major themes in the history of human development in the physical environment after the Middle Ages to the present. The main emphasis will be on the interaction between humans, their developing societies and the environment. The consequences of technology in relation to modernization, industrialization and human habitation form a central theme. Fulfills CORE requirement. (Spring)

1321 The United States to 1865
This course surveys the historical topics of U.S. History from pre-Columbian eras to the Civil War. The main emphasis is on the political, social, economic, and cultural events that shape the developing nation. Fulfills CORE requirement. (Fall)

1322 The United States Since 1865
This course surveys historical topics of U.S. History since Reconstruction to the present. The main emphasis is on the effects of modernization, industrialization and political changes that shape modern America. Fulfills CORE requirement. (Spring)

2322 Texas History
This course surveys the history of Texas from the Spanish Empire to Modern Texas. It studies the impact of the Spanish Empire, the nation of Mexico and twentieth century changes on the political, economic, and cultural history of Texas. Does not fulfill CORE requirement. (Fall, Spring)

3320 United States Economic History
See ECON 3320.

3324 Colonial America
This course studies the founding and development of the thirteen original colonies, and the political, cultural, religious and economic development of American society prior to the American Revolution. Prerequisites: HIST 1321 (Fall, every other even-numbered year)

3325 U.S. National Period
This course studies the Constitutional convention and the presidencies of Washington to Monroe; the origin and impact of political parties; early commercial and industrial development; and changes in American political system and society. Prerequisites: HIST 1321 (Spring, every other odd-numbered year)

3326 The Rise of Modern America, 1870-1920
This course studies the transformation of the United States from an agrarian to an industrial society; the rise of big business, immigration, organized labor, urbanization, populism, and progressivism. Prerequisites: HIST 1322 (Fall, every other odd-numbered year)

3327 United States from World War I to World War II
This course examines the social, political, and economic issues that influenced America between the world wars. Emphases include the Crash of 1929, the Depression, and the New Deal. Prerequisites: HIST 1322 (Spring, every other even-numbered year)

3328 The United States since 1945
This course studies the various political, social, and economic issues that have influenced contemporary society since World War II. Prerequisites: HIST 1322 (Fall, every other even-numbered years)

3331 Colonial Latin America
This course studies the establishment and development of the Spanish and Portuguese empires in America to the 1820s. Special emphasis on economic, social, racial, and religious values and traditions. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective. Prerequisites: HIST 1311 (Fall, odd-numbered years)

3332 Latin America since Independence
This course is a study of the movement for independence, its origins and models. It includes Latin American realities, problems, and prospects in contemporary times. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective. Prerequisites: HIST 1312 (Spring, even-numbered years)

3340 Europe Since Columbus
This course studies the political, economic, and religious expansion of Europe from the 15th century to World War I; the rise of the modern state system and the nature of modern society since the French Revolution; the ideological roots and nature of totalitarianism as well as the role played by Europe in world affairs from the Cold War to the 1990s; the collapse of the Soviet Union and of Yugoslavia; and the ongoing efforts to create a united European Continent. Prerequisites: HIST 1312 (Fall, even-numbered years)

4332 Mexico
This course studies pre-Columbian civilizations, the Spanish heritage of Mexico, and the movement for independence; the eras of Benito Juarez and Porfirio Diaz; the Mexican Revolution, the rise of Mexican consciousness and the welfare state; and economic and political problems of today. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective. Prerequisites: HIST 1312 (Spring, odd-numbered years)

4334 History of Portuguese America
This course analyzes of the impact of Portuguese expansion on Brazil from Henry the Navigator to Pedro II as well as the formation of independent Brazil through the 1990s. It studies the patterns of economics; the contributions of Amerindians, Africans, Europeans, and Asians in shaping Brazil’s culture; and the nature of Brazilian politics and society. Prerequisites: HIST 1312 (Fall, odd numbered years)

4341 Making History I
This course examines historiography of American history, and important schools and representative historians and their works. It also includes study of different methods of research and writing history. Prerequisites: At least 3 semester hours of upper division History courses. (Fall, even-numbered years)

4342 Making History II
This course adds to the skills acquired in Making History I. It includes study of the research and writing of different schools of history, locating and exploiting sources, research in archives, and writing substantive historical studies. Prerequisite: HIST 4341. (Spring, odd numbered years)

4350 Selected Topics in World History
This course focuses on a variety of topics in world history. These topics can include the history of Africa, the history of Eastern Europe, the history of Asia, and other topics as they are needed by the department.

4352 Selected Topics In U.S. History
This course provides an umbrella for the study of many political, social, economic, and cultural events and values that have shaped United States History. The topics can vary widely and will be shaped by the individual professor. The course gives an enriching opportunity for students to take a broad range of topics in American History. Can be repeated for credit. May be taken as a Cultural Studies Elective,

INTERIOR ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN (INTD)
[Program Description, page 168]

1358 Introduction to Architectural Drawing
Development of perceptual skills and standard graphic language used by designers as a means to design exploration and communication. Study of architectural sketching and basic rendering techniques. Study of orthographic projection and isometrics. Work in pencil and pen. Laboratory, 6 hours a week. (Fall, odd-numbered years)

1355 Introduction to Architectural Design
Study of the basic criteria of design for the built environment. Integration of visual elements and organization of two and three-dimensional space with architectural form and function. Study of theories of major architects and designers and application in design. Laboratory, 6 hours a week. Fee. Prerequisite: INTD 1361. (Fall, odd numbered years)

1361 Architectural Drawing I
Fundamentals of the use of architectural drawing equipment. Basic plan layouts and working drawings as a means of transmitting the designer’s intent. To include schedules and some interior elevations. Work in pencil. Laboratory, 9 hours a week. Fee (Fall, odd-numbered years)

1362 Architectural Drawing II
Continuation of Architectural Drawing I. In-depth practice of working drawings in elevation and section. Study of axonometrics. Work in ink. Laboratory, 9 hours a week. Fee. Prerequisites: INTD 1361. (Fall, even-numbered years)

2320 Construction, Architectural Components, Systems, and Codes
Introduction into the process of how buildings are put together. Emphasis is on understanding and identifying the components common to all construction. (Fall, odd-numbered years)

2363 Architectural Graphics I
Practice in various techniques of black and white and color rendering required for visual communication of the designer’s concepts. Laboratory, 6 hours a week. Fee. Prerequisites: INTD 1361, ARTS 1311, 2311. (Fall, odd-numbered years)

2364 Color Theory
Developing sensitivity to the effects of color-physiologically, psychological, and emotionally, and the ability to control these elements through color application in various design situations. (Fall, odd numbered years)

2365 Architectural Graphics II
Continuation of Architectural Graphics I. In-depth practice in various techniques of black and white and color rendering required for visual communication of the designer’s concepts. Laboratory, 6 hours a week. Fee. Prerequisites: INTD 2363

2370 Lighting and Design
Lighting products and their applications within interior environments. Lighting trends and how to create moods with lighting techniques. Technical terminology of lighting will be explored from the architect and designer point-of-view. (Fall, even-numbered years)

2375 Space Planning
Principles and procedures of interior and open design systems for quick planning and design of commercial layouts, to include square footage calculations and use of a CAD system. INTD 3171 should be taken concurrently. Fee. Prerequisites: INTD 1361, 1362, and permission of the instructor. (Spring)

3171 Computer Aided Drafting and Design I
Hands-on computer use to explore space planning and increase design abilities. Laboratory, 3 hours a week. Fee. Prerequisites: INTD 1361 (Fall)

3311 Business Interiors
Examination of functional and aesthetically pleasing working environments. Psychological and physical effects on workers and clients in relationship to the designed space are analyzed. (Fall, even-numbered years)

3350 Interior Materials
Developing good judgment in the purchase, use, and care of materials; identification of finishes, hard and soft surfacing, coloring, and application. Local field trips required. (Fall, even-numbered years)

3362 History of Architecture and Furniture I
History of furniture interiors and architecture from Egyptian times to the French Renaissance. (Fall, even numbered years)

3363 History of Architecture and Furniture II
History of furniture interiors and architecture from the French Renaissance to the 20th Century. (Spring)

3367 Interior Design I
Introduction to solving problems for residential and commercial environments. Organizing and furnishing interiors, estimating cost of materials and furnishings. Projects to be jury critiqued. 6 studio hours a week. Fee. Prerequisites: INTD 1361, 2362, 2363; ARTS 1311, 2311. (Fall, even-numbered years)

3370 Interior Design II
Interior design problems of moderate scope. Studying human needs and behavioral patterns for specified environments. Design analysis and criticism of concepts. 6 studio hours a week. Fee. Prerequisites: INTD 3367 (Fall)

373 Computer Aided Drafting and Design
Continuation of CAD I with emphasis on architectural floor plans, elevations, and furniture layouts. Laboratory, 9 hours a week. Fee. Prerequisites: INTD 1358, 1361, 1362, and 3171. (Spring)

3375 Interior Design III
Design of larger scale interiors for residential and commercial structures. Analytical study of space and function. Developing presentation boards for color, furnishings, accessories, and building materials. Full perspective drawings with floor plan, elevations, and visual concepts. 6 studio hours a week. Fee. Prerequisite: INTD 3368 (Fall, odd numbered years)

4320 The World and Architectural Design
Design of simple structures and dwellings with emphasis on the process by which design evaluations and decisions are made. Study scale models and presentation drawings. Laboratory, 6 hours a week. Fee. Prerequisites: INTD 1355, 1361, 3367, 3368. (Fall, even-numbered years)

4361 Work Experience in Interior Design
Supervised experiences in an approved related work situation to give the student new training experiences and different perspectives. May be taken during junior or senior year. Fee.

4363 Environmental Controls
Architectural factors affecting interiors in the areas of sound, lighting, insulation, mechanical and electrical systems, and personal comfort. Prerequisites: INTD 1361, 1362. (Spring)

4375 Interior Design IV
Advanced problems in interior design. Coordination of total project including scope of work, furniture, accessories, materials, and lighting schedules. Projects to be jury critiqued. 6 studio hours a week. Fee. Prerequisites: INTD 3375, 4310; Senior level. (Spring)

4395 Professional Practice In Interior Design
Examination of the business practice and terminology within various business formations of sole proprietorships, partnerships and corporations. The study of written documents and forms; estimating and control of budgets. Fee.

KINESIOLOGY (PEHP)
(see program description page 199)

1199 Activity Lab
Testing and assessment of motor skills used in individual and team sports. Recommendations for further development of proficiency in selected skills will be made as a result of the course evaluation.

2201 Tests and Measurement
Principles of measurement, statistical concepts, and standardized tests of performance-related and health-related fitness.

3105 Principles of Health
A study of health principles and activities for children that enhance positive lifestyle.

3110 Middle School Physical Education
A view of middle school physical education students and movement programs to enhance motor performance and health-related performance.

3301 Motor and Fitness Development for Children
Motor development, physical fitness, rhythmic activities, tumbling skills, and perceptual awareness skills and their application to child development (Prerequisite: All Level Kinesiology Majors Only).

3302 Motor and Fitness Development for Pre-Adolescents
Further sequential development of motor skills, physical fitness, rhythmic activities, and tumbling skills. Prerequisite: All Level Kinesiology Majors Only.

3305 Motor Development, Fitness, and Health
An overview of the impact of motor and physical fitness development upon children from birth to pre-adolescence. Activities to enhance motor development and provide a healthy lifestyle.

3350 Theory of Movement Forms: Analysis and Construction
The interrelationship of kinematics and kinetics of motion. Physiological and psychological development of the child in relation to learning neuromuscular activities.

3371 Care and Prevention of Injuries
Basic first aid theory and skills. Techniques for the care and prevention of athletic injuries, including CPR.

3410 Motor and Fitness Development for Adolescents
Further sequential development of motor skills and physical fitness. Knowledge and skill for developing leisure and lifetime sports activities. Practical application of coaching theories including coaching techniques and officiating.

4301 Principles of Human Movement
The humanistic foundations of movement with emphasis on history and philosophy. A study of the impact of motor learning, exercise physiology and biomechanics upon human physical performance (Prerequisite PEHP 3301 or PEHP 3302 or PEHP 3410)

4333 Fundamentals of Human Performance
The theoretical study and practical application of exercise through an understanding of the metabolic and energetic process. To include topics which impact performance such as body composition, nutrition, training, environment, aging, disease, and substance abuse.
4345 Psychomotor Development: Educational Implications
Normal psychomotor development and study of the range of planned motor development and physical conditioning activities for young children and persons exhibiting delays in motor abilities.

4395 Practical Experience
(non-certification physical education)

MATHEMATICS (MATH)
[Program Description, page 186 ]

1304 College Algebra
This course covers algebraic operations; binomial expansion; functions and functional notation; polynomial equations and inequalities; graphing techniques; graphs of polynomial and rational functions; inverse functions; systems of linear equations and inequalities; problems from the physical and social sciences and business. Prerequisite: sufficiently strong high school mathematics and SAT score, or sufficiently high score on mathematics placement test or successful completion of Academic Literacy objectives in mathematics. (Every semester)

1306 Geometry and the Imagination
This course aims to convey depth in geometric thinking, as well as the breadth of geometrical connections to disciplines from the liberal and fine arts, business, engineering, and the sciences. Study will include the foundations of measurement and construction in plane and solid geometry described by Euclid and will extend to more recent discoveries in modern geometry, topology, and chaos theory. It is designed to satisfy the core requirement as well as enhance those programs with a strong mathematics component. (Fall and Spring semester)

1311 Precalculus
This course covers trigonometric functions; trigonometric equations and identities; inverse trigonometric functions; laws of sines and cosines; binomial theorem; sequences and series; mathematical induction; binomial theorem; polar form of complex number; polar coordinates and polar equations; exponential and logarithmic functions and their graphs. Prerequisite: sufficiently strong high school mathematics and SAT score, or sufficiently high score on mathematics placement test, or MATH 1304. (Every semester)

2303 Introduction to Probability and Statistics
This course covers elementary probability theory, techniques of statistical inference including sampling theory, estimation procedures, and hypothesis testing. Prerequisite: sufficiently strong high school mathematics and SAT score, or sufficiently high score on mathematics placement test or successful completion of Academic Literacy objectives in mathematics, or MATH 1304 or higher. (Every semester)

2312 Calculus I
This course covers functions, limits, derivatives, and integrals; exponential and logarithmic functions; inverse trigonometric functions; and applications. Prerequisite: sufficiently strong high school mathematics and SAT score, MATH 1311 with a C or better or permission of the instructor. (Fall and Spring Semesters)

2313 Calculus II
This course covers formal integration, indeterminate forms, improper integrals, and infinite series. Prerequisite: MATH 2312 with a C or better or permission of the instructor. (Fall and Spring Semesters)

2314 Differential Equations
This course covers linear differential equations, series solutions, and applications. Prerequisite: MATH 2313 with a C or better or permission of the instructor. (Spring of even-numbered years)

2322 Linear Algebra
This course covers vector spaces, linear transformations and matrices. Prerequisite: MATH 1304 with a C or better or permission of the instructor. (Fall)

2374 Mathematics for Elementary Teachers
This is a three-hour course that covers those mathematical topics considered as essential elements for teachers of elementary school mathematics. Development of mathematics concepts through the process of doing mathematics will create a foundation for mathematical understanding. Numerous problem-based activities are interwoven with a discussion of mathematical content to produce a course used to engage students in mathematics exploration. (Fall)

2375 Mathematics and Science Pedagogy for elementary Teachers
This is a three-hour course that develops concepts through the process of active involvement and creates a foundation for mathematical and scientific understanding. Manipulative and science instructional kits provide the basis for developing the pedagogy of elementary pre-service teachers. Student error patterns are interwoven with a discussion of mathematics and science pedagogy to produce a course used to engage students in high quality mathematics and science instruction. Instructional and assessment strategies are chosen for the optimal preparation of teachers of elementary school mathematics and science. (Spring)

3314 Calculus III
This course covers vectors, differential calculus of functions of several variables, multiple integrals, and applications. Prerequisite: MATH 2313 with a C or better or permission of the instructor. (Fall)

3320 Foundations of Higher Mathematics
This course is a rigorous development of ideas prerequisite to the study of abstract mathematics with emphasis on proving theorems involving logic, set theory, relations and functions. Prerequisite: 9 semester hours in mathematics or permission of instructor. (Fall)

3325 Abstract Algebra and Number Theory
This course introduces groups, rings, and fields. Algebraic ideas are developed in parallel with the considerations of congruence and congruence classes, which normally arise in elementary number theory. It includes applications to the theory of equations. Prerequisite: MATH 3320 with a C or better or permission of the instructor. (Spring)

3340 History of Mathematics
This course covers the historical development of mathematics, algebra, geometry, and the evolution of symbolism. Prerequisite: 9 semester hours in mathematics or permission of instructor. (Fall, odd-numbered years)

3350 Introduction to Real Analysis
This course covers point set topology, metric spaces, compactness, connectedness, completeness, sequences and series, and uniform convergence. Prerequisite: MATH 3314 with a C or better. (Spring, even-numbered years)

3355 Introduction to Numerical Analysis
This course covers elementary numerical algorithms for mathematical and scientific computing: interpolation, numerical calculus, and numerical solutions to linear equation and equation systems, Eigenvalue problems, and matrix decompositions. Prerequisite: MATH 2313, MATH 2322, and one higher-level computer programming language, or instructor’s permission. (Spring, odd-numbered years)

3360 Discrete Mathematics
This course is an introduction to non-continuous mathematics, which contains topics of interest in computer science, social science, management, and mathematics. Topics include logic, counting, relations, graph theory and algorithms. Prerequisite: MATH 3325 or permission of instructor. (Spring, odd numbered years)

4331 Introduction to Probability Theory
This course covers discrete and continuous probability spaces; random variables and their distributions; and connections to parametric and non-parametric investigations. Prerequisite: MATH 2313 or permission of instructor. (Fall, even-numbered years)

4341 Modern Geometry
This course covers elementary geometry from an advanced standpoint. Prerequisite: MATH 3320 with a C or better or permission of instructor. (Spring, odd-numbered years)

METEOROLOGY (METR)
[Program Description, 186 ]

1325 Natural Hazards
Natural hazards is a survey of the natural events that affect the Earth including, severe thunderstorms, extreme hail events, lightning, hurricanes, tornadoes, floods, tsunami, earthquakes, and volcanic events.

1360 Climatology
Climatology is an introduction to the Earth’s the basic physical concepts of weather and climate, the relationship between atmospheric processes and a variety of other aspects of our physical environment, Earth’s history, agriculture, our economy, and society.

1430 Meteorology
This course is a study of the composition, structure, and physical properties of the Earth’s atmosphere. Course includes a study of the interaction of the Earth’s atmosphere with the land, oceans, and life on Earth. Fee. (Spring)

2310 Remote Sensing
The course explores the physics of the primary ground-based remote sensors used for operational monitoring of the atmosphere. The capabilities and limitations of the various systems will be studied to determine their impact on applications. The use and applications of remote sensors will include meteorological radar and wind profilers. Prerequisites: GEOL 1321, METR 1430.

2315 Synoptic Meteorology I
Synoptic meteorology is an introduction to atmospheric structure, elementary thermodynamics, synoptic meteorology, and use of computers in meteorology. The course includes theory and practice of weather analysis and forecasting, surface and upper air analysis, fronts and wave cyclones, satellite meteorology, sounding analysis, thermodynamic diagram, cross sections, forecasting, NMC models, MOS, radar meteorology, severe weather. Prerequisites: METR 1360, METR 2310.

2320 Severe Weather
Severe weather involves a detailed descriptive account of the physical processes important in the formation of various severe and unusual weather phenomena including: thunderstorms, tornadoes, hail storms, lightning, hurricanes, mid-latitude snowstorms, lake effect snows, atmospheric optical effects, and global climate change. Prerequisites: METR 1430, METR 1360.

2325 Statistical Climatology
The course is a survey of the types of statistical weather data available for analysis and interpretation of climate and climate change. Statistical analysis includes examination of observational data and manipulation of the data on various temporal and spatial scales. Prerequisites: METR 1360, METR 2310.

2330 Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in Meteorology
This course deals with the design and implementation and use of GIS in decision-making and problem solving in meteorology. This course will further the student’s understanding of how GIS can be implemented and utilized in weather related operations areas. Prerequisite: METR 2310.

2335 Satellite Meteorology
The course focuses on applications of remote sensing of the atmosphere using satellite observations, including cloud detection and the retrieval of atmospheric temperature, and atmospheric moisture and ozone content. The course also teaches the interpretation of imagery collected from weather satellites. Prerequisites: METR 1360, METR 2310.

3320 Forecasting I
A survey forecast guidance products and the application of physical principles to weather
forecasting and the interpretation and use of computer-generated forecast guidance products of the National Weather Service. Prerequisites: METR 2315, METR 2320

3325 Thermodynamic Meteorology
This course is a study of atmospheric processes that influence and play a part in the development and behavior of large-scale weather systems. Prerequisites: METR 2335, METR 3320.

3330 Forecasting II
The course involves an application of physical principles to weather forecasting and the use and interpretation of computer-generated forecast guidance products of the National Weather Service. The course includes an introduction to the structure and dynamics of convective and mesoscale phenomena, including mesoscale convective systems, severe thunderstorms, tornadoes, low-level jets, mountain waves and hurricanes. Prerequisites: METR 2335, METR 3320.

3340 Hydrology
The course is an overview of hydrological processes with emphasis on the hydrological cycle, surface hydrology, groundwater hydrology, measurement techniques and interpretation of stream flow, precipitation, soil moisture, and rainfall runoff. Prerequisites: METR 1360, METR 1430.

3350 Synoptic Meteorology II
The course is a study of the theory and practice of weather analysis and forecasting, surface and upper air analysis, fronts and wave cyclones, satellite meteorology, sounding analysis, thermodynamic diagram, cross sections, forecasting, NMC models, MOS, radar meteorology, severe weather. Prerequisites: METR 2335, METR 3320

4310 Weatercasting I
The course is a survey of weather graphic
systems used in the broadcast industry and their use in developing weathercasts for
television. Prerequisites: METR 3330,
METR 3350.

4320 Weatercasting II
The course includes the use and application of weather graphic systems to develop on-air weather broadcasts, with an emphasis on severe weather coverage. Prerequisite: METR 4310.


4330 Workshop
This course is designed to provide the student with a series of meteorological short-courses in a professional conference format with opportunities for students to present case studies of selected weather events/phenomena and to hear presentations from, among others, the National Weather Service, NOAA, NASA, EPA and UIW faculty. Prerequisites: Completion of all course requirements for the Certificate in Broadcast Meteorology program.

4371 Special Topics
This course includes an in-depth study of one or more of the following topics in forecasting, Weatercasting, applications of GIS in meteorology, severe weather, and climate studies. Prerequisite: 18 hours of upper-level Meteorology courses

MUSIC, APPLIED PRIVATE (MUAP)

APPLIED MUSIC, PRIVATE INSTRUCTION (MUAP)
1354, 1355, 2354, 2355, 3354, 3355, 4354, 4355 Private Instruction: Instrumental
Instruction is offered on an individual basis for the following instruments:

Bassoon, Oboe, English Horn, Clarinet, Bass Clarinet, Double Bass, Flute, Guitar, Horn, Saxophone, Percussion, Trumpet, Euphonium, Trombone, Cello, Viola, Violin, Harp Note: private instruction in Electric Bass and Electric Guitar are available at the 1354 level, but may not be chosen as principal instruments. Repertoire and technique start at the beginning university level and advance as specified in the course syllabi. The students must provide their own instrument. Placement is determined by the instructor. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Fee (Every semester)

1365, 1366, 2365, 2366, 3365, 3366, 4365, 4366 Private Instruction: Organ
Instruction in organ is offered on an individual basis. Repertoire and technique start at the beginning university level and advance as specified in the course syllabi. Placement is determined by the instructor. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Fee (Every semester)

1376, 1377, 2376, 2377, 3376, 3377, 4376, 4377 Private Instruction: Voice
Instruction in voice is offered on an individual basis. Repertoire and technique start at the beginning university level and advance as specified in the course syllabi. Placement is determined by the instructor. Prerequisites: MUSI 1311 Singing for Beginners or permission of instructor. Fee. (Every semester)

4378 Private Instruction: Vocal Coaching
Instruction in vocal coaching is offered on an individual basis. This course entails the musical, lingual, and interpretative preparation of advanced vocal repertoire. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Student must be concurrently enrolled in Private Instruction: Voice MUAP 3376, MUAP 3377, MUAP 4376, or MUAP 4377. Fee (Every semester)

1387, 1388, 2387, 2388, 3387, 3388, 4387, 4388 Private Instruction: Piano
Instruction in piano is offered on an individual basis. Repertoire and technique start at the beginning university level and advance as specified in the course syllabi. Placement is determined by the instructor. Prerequisites: permission of the instructor. Fee (Every semester)

2356, 2357, 3356, 3357, 4356 Private Instruction: Composition
Instruction in composition is offered on an individual basis. Level of instruction ranges from introductory to advanced as specified in the course syllabi. Students will create original music and will also receive training in the use of computer music notation software. The instructor determines placement. Prerequisites: MUSI 1322, Music Theory II, MUSI 1192, Aural Skills II, and permission of the instructor. Fee (Every semester)

3358 Private Instruction: Electronic Composition
Instruction in electronic composition is offered on an individual basis. The purpose of this course is to prepare students to create musical compositions using electronic instruments and computer software. Prerequisite: MUSI 3324 Music Theory IV and permission of the instructor. May be repeated for credit. Fee (Every semester)

3389 Private Instruction: Jazz Improvisation
Instruction in jazz improvisation is offered on an individual basis. The purpose of this course is to help students develop as improvisers in the jazz idiom. Prerequisite: MUSI 3324 Music Theory IV and permission of instructor. Fee (Every semester)

MUSI AND ENSEMBLE (MUSI)
[Program Description, page 110]

1131 Chorale
Open to all members of the Incarnate Word Community, the Chorale is the primary vocal ensemble at UIW. Partially fulfills the CORE Fine Arts requirement. The Chorale represents the University in concerts and public performances throughout the school year. May be repeated for credit. Admission by audition only. Fee (Every semester)

1160 Mariachi Ensemble
The Mariachi Ensemble is devoted to the performance of mariachi music. Partially fulfills the CORE Fine Arts requirement for non-music majors and music minors. Admission by audition only. Fee. (Every Semester)

1181 Orchestra
The UIW Community Orchestra is a performing group open to all students of the University and musicians from the San Antonio area that haveinstrumental performing experience. Partially fulfills the CORE Fine Arts requirement. May be repeated for credit. Admission by audition only. Fee (Every semester)

1182 Jazz Ensemble
The Jazz Ensemble performs a variety of jazz and contemporary styles of music. Partially fulfills the CORE Fine Arts requirement. Admission by audition only. Fee. (Every semester)

1183 Flute Choir
The Flute Choir performs ensemble music for flutes. Literature from all eras is studied and performed. Partially fulfills the CORE Fine Arts requirement for non-music majors and music minors. Admission by audition only. Fee. (Every semester)

1185 Wind Ensemble
The UIW wind ensemble is comprised of students and members of the community who play brass, woodwind, and percussion instruments. They perform wind ensemble works of various styles and historical periods. Partially fulfills the CORE Fine Arts requirement. Admission by audition only. Fee. (Every semester)

1100 Introduction to Aural Skills
This course is an introduction to aural skills for students who have little previous experience in ear training. Required for all entering freshman music majors or minors who score 69% or less in the aural skills entrance diagnostic test. Must be taken as part of the learning community with MUSI 1300 Introduction to Music Theory. (Fall)

1300 Introduction to Music Theory
This course is an introduction to music theory for students who have little previous experience with technical aspects of music. Required for all entering freshman music majors or minors who score 69% or less in the music theory entrance diagnostic test. Must be taken as part of the learning community with MUSI 1100 Introduction to Aural Skills. (Fall)

1191 Aural Skills I
This course covers melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic dictation; ear training; and sight singing. Prerequisite: score of at least 70% on the aural skills entrance diagnostic test. Must be taken as part of the learning community with MUSI 1321 Music Theory I. (Fall)

1192 Aural Skills II
This course is a continuation of MUSI 1191. Prerequisite: MUSI 1191. Must be taken as part of the learning community with MUSI 1322 Music Theory II. (Spring)

1310 Keyboard Skills for Music Majors
This course is designed to provide music students with the necessary skills to pass the piano proficiency examination required for all music majors. The final examination in this course serves as the piano proficiency examination. Prerequisite: MUSI 1300 Introduction to Music Theory or MUSI 1321 Music Theory I. This course may not be repeated for credit. (Spring)

1311 Singing for Beginners
This course is especially designed for non-music majors and non-voice majors. It focuses on principles of breathing and tone production, fundamentals of diction, basic music reading, and simple songs. May be repeated for credit. Fulfills CORE Fine Arts requirement. No prerequisite. (Every semester)


1320 Music Appreciation
The purpose of this course is to expose the non-musician to the basic mechanics of music and music making (instruments, sound, rhythm, texture, etc.) and also to a wide variety of musical styles, from the middle ages to the pop genres of the 20th century. It is expected that students will obtain the tools and the experience necessary in order to develop the capacity to understand and value different musical styles. It fulfills the CORE Fine Arts requirement. No prerequisite. (Every semester)

1321 Music Theory I
This is the first of a four-course sequence designed to offer an introduction to the principles and practice of harmony in Western Music from the seventeenth century to the present day. Prerequisite: score of at least 70% on the theory entrance diagnostic test. Must be taken as part of the learning community with MUSI 1191 Aural Skills I. (Fall)

1322 Music Theory II
This is the second of a four-course sequence designed to offer an introduction to the principles and practice of harmony in Western Music from the seventeenth century to the present day. Prerequisite: MUSI 1321 Music Theory I. Should be taken as part of the learning community with MUSI 1192 Aural Skills II. (Spring)

1381 Class Piano
This beginning-level course is especially designed for non-music majors. Basic music reading skills are developed and basic popular repertoire is covered. Fulfills CORE Fine Arts requirement. No prerequisite. (Every semester)

1391 Class Guitar
This beginning-level course is especially designed for non-music majors. Students will learn the fundamentals of reading music as well as basic right and left hand guitar technique. Students must provide their own guitar. Fulfills CORE Fine Arts requirement. No prerequisite. (Every semester)

2111 Opera Workshop
This course prepares small operatic ensembles for public performance, and includes the production of Opera Scenes. Prerequisite: advanced singing and music reading skills. Admission by audition only. May be repeated for credit. Fee. (As needed)

2132 Madrigal Singers
Madrigal Singers is a select vocal ensemble. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in MUSI 1131 Chorale, and audition with instructor. Partially fulfills the CORE Fine Arts requirement for non-music majors and music minors. May be repeated for credit. Fee (Every semester)

2193 Advanced Aural Skills III
This course is a continuation of MUSI 1192. Prerequisite: MUSI 1192 Aural Skills II. (Fall)

2194 Advanced Aural Skills IV
This course is a continuation of MUSI 2193. Prerequisite: MUSI 2193 Advanced Aural Skills III. (Spring)

2323 Music Theory III
This is the third of a four-course sequence designed to offer an introduction to the principles and practice of harmony in Western Music from the seventeenth century to the present day. Prerequisite: MUSI 1322 Music Theory II. (Fall)

2350 Survey of Musical Theatre in the U.S.
This course surveys musical theatre in the United States. Genres explored include musical revues, opera, operetta and musicals with a special emphasis on 20th century Broadway. Open to non-majors. This course is cross-listed with THAR 2350. No prerequisites. Fulfills CORE Fine Arts requirement. (As needed)


2381 Intermediate Class Piano
This course is designed for non-majors who are interested in additional piano instruction after MUSI 1381, Class Piano. Prerequisite: MUSI 1381 Class Piano or permission of instructor. (Spring)

3323 Orchestration
This course covers instrumentation and aspects of orchestration so that the student will learn how to score and arrange music for various types of small and large ensembles. Prerequisite: MUSI 3324 Music Theory IV (As needed)

3324 Music Theory IV
This is the fourth of a four-course sequence designed to offer an introduction to the principles and practice of harmony in Western Music from the seventeenth century to the present day. Prerequisite: MUSI 2323 Music Theory III. (Spring)

3327 Counterpoint
Renaissance and Baroque styles of polyphony in analysis, performance, and composition are taught in this class. Prerequisite: MUSI 3324 Music Theory IV. (As needed)

3388 Internship in Liturgical Music
This course is designed to teach the professional and practical skills for organizing, directing, and playing for liturgical services. Prerequisite: advanced keyboard skills and permission of instructor. (As needed)

3350 American Popular Music
Survey of the development of American popular music, from its roots in the merging of colonial European, African, and Native American styles, to the development in the twentieth century of blues, rock-and-roll, rap, salsa, and other popular contemporary styles of North and South America. Open to non-majors. No prerequisite. Fulfills CORE requirements for Fine Arts. (As needed)

3341 Music History to 1750
This course is designed to introduce the music major to the different musical styles, composers, genres, and aesthetic views of the Western world from the time of the ancient Greeks to the time of Bach and Handel. Prerequisite: MUSI 1322 Music Theory II. (Fall)

3342 Music History from 1750
This course is designed to introduce the music major to the different musical styles, composers, genres, and aesthetic views of the Western world from the time of Mozart and Haydn to the present. Prerequisite: MUSI 3341 Music History to 1750 or permission of instructor. (Spring)

3343 Pedagogy of Music in the 20th Century
This course explores the various philosophies and techniques as developed by Kodaly, Orff, Dalcroze, and Suzuki, as well as the American tradition of music development. Required for elementary music certification. Prerequisite: MUSI 3324 Music Theory IV. (As needed)

3344 Creative Development in Music I
This course addresses skill development and music for use in the classroom. Required for elementary music certification. Prerequisite: MUSI 1322 Music Theory II. (As needed)

3345 Brass and Woodwinds Instrument Techniques
This course covers basic playing and teaching techniques of brass and woodwind instruments. Prerequisite: MUSI 1322 Music Theory II. Fee (As needed)

3346 String and Percussion Instrument Techniques
This course covers basic playing and teaching techniques of string and percussion instruments. Prerequisite: MUSI 1322 Music Theory II. Fee (As needed)

2346 History of Jazz
This course offers a survey of jazz artists and jazz styles; topics include: Cultural and musical origins of jazz, blues, ragtime, Dixieland, the swing era, bebop, fusion, contemporary styles, and artists associated with all of these. Fulfills CORE Fine Arts requirement for non-majors; available to music majors as an elective. No prerequisite. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective. (As needed)

3347 Survey/Appreciation of Opera
This course provides students with an in-depth experience of the history of opera, the elements of opera, and the major representative works of the genre. Fulfills CORE curriculum Fine Arts requirement. No prerequisite. (As needed)

3348 Studies in World Music
This course introduces the student to the music of a variety of world cultures and addresses issues related to contemporary music production, mass-media proliferation, and cultural appropriation. Required for all music majors Available to music minors as an upper division elective with permission of the instructor. Prerequisite: MUSI 3342 Music History from 1750, or permission of instructor. May be taken as a cultural studies elective, with permission of instructor. (As needed)

3361 Vocal Techniques and Diction
This class addresses vocal problems, techniques, methods and materials, plus study of Spanish, Italian, German, French, and English vocal diction. Required for voice, accompanying, and teacher certification majors. Prerequisite: MUSI 3324. (As needed)


4323 Form and Analysis
This is an advanced course in stylistic analysis; it is designed for advanced music majors as a practical application of their previous studies in music history, theory, and performance. This course entails comprehensive analysis of all aspects of musical style, including form, harmonic language, texture, and instrumentation. Required for all music majors except students seeking a Bachelor of Music in Music Therapy, or a Bachelor of Arts with and emphasis in Music Industry Studies. Available to music minors as an upper division elective with permission of the instructor. Prerequisite: MUSI 3324 Music Theory IV. (As needed)

4343 Creative Development in Music I
This course addresses skill development for the music learner of middle and high school level. Required for music certification. Prerequisite: MUSI 1322 Music Theory II. (As needed)

4344 Conducting
This course explores the theory and practice of techniques of choral and instrumental conducting. It includes practical conducting activities. Prerequisite: MUSI 3324 Music Theory IV. (As needed)

MUSIC INDUSTRY STUDIES (MUST)
[Program Description, page 110]

2325 Studio Arranging
This course covers the arranging of commercial music for acoustic instruments and voices, and for electronic instruments, including synthesizers; drum machines, and sequencers, for production in a recording studio. Prerequisites: MUSI 1322 Music Theory II. Fee. May be repeated for credit. (As needed)

2340 Introduction to Music Industry Studies
This course is a survey of the component areas of contemporary music industries, including recording technologies, music publishing, music marketing, and artist management. This class addresses possible focuses within the Music Industries Studies program. In addition to class work, there will be five on-site music business practicum experiences. No prerequisites. (Fall)

2350 Music Industry Studies II
This course focuses on all music industry careers not directly related to the recording process. In addition to class work, there will be an eight-week (ten-hour per week) internship at a local music-related business such as a radio station, management company, or sound studio. Prerequisites: MUST 2340 Introduction to Music Industries Studies. (Spring)

4359 Internship in Music Industry Studies
This capstone course in the Music Industry Studies program is designed to prepare the student in a focused area related to the music industry. Work experience is coordinated through merchants, recording studios, music publishers, professional entertainment management, etc. Permission of the instructor. Prerequisites: Completion of all coursework or permission of instructor. (As needed)

MUSIC THERAPY (MUTH)
[Program Description, page 100]

1301 Introduction to Music Therapy
This course presents an overview of the theory, history, and research base of Music Therapy. Applications of Music Therapy in various settings and with various populations are reviewed and demonstrated. No prerequisite. (Spring)

2271 Clinical Orientation
This course presents an overview of the clinical treatment process ethics, and group process as preparation for future practicum and intern experiences. Students are required to observe and report of five music therapy sessions with practicing music therapists in the San Antonio, Austin, and South Texas areas. Prerequisite: MUTH

2351 Music in Therapy I
This course includes the study and clinical practice of Music Therapy for specific populations. This semester focuses on working with children from birth to adolescence. Students participate in and lead Music Therapy activities in clinical sessions under the supervision of a Registered or Certified Music Therapist who is working in the San Antonio or Austin area. Prerequisites: MUTH 1271 and permission of instructor. (Spring)

2352 Music in Therapy II
This course is a continuation of MUTH 2351 with a focus on working with adolescents and adults in emotional distress. Prerequisite: MUTH 2351. (Fall 2001, then every other year)

2353 Music in Therapy III
This course is a continuation of MUTH 2352 with a focus on working within geriatric and medical settings. Prerequisite: MUTH 2352. (Spring 2001, then every other year)

2388 Piano Improvisation
This class teaches skill development and creative exploration of piano improvisation techniques. The knowledge and skill of various styles of keyboard accompaniments obtained in this course are applied in clinical fieldwork experiences and classroom experiences. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. (As needed)

3301 Psychology of Music
This course is an in-depth study of the principles underlying the practice of Music Therapy and musical behavior. Psychoacoustics, auditory perception, emotions and meaning in music, music in cultures, and music and its relationship to development and behavior are specifically addressed. Prerequisite: PSYC 1301 Introduction to Psychology. NOTE: Psychology majors may take this course to fulfill the Core Fine Arts requirement. (Spring)

3305 Creative Improvisation in Therapy
In this course, improvisational techniques for therapeutic purposes are explored and experienced. Improvisational mediums include music and sound patterns, music and movement, and techniques of communicating with others through music. Prerequisite: MUTH 1301 and MUTH 1271. (Fall every other year)

4200 Senior Seminar
This course provides an update on current research and research techniques. Senior Music Therapy project and presentation of project are required. Prerequisites: Completion of course-work for Music Therapy degree and permission of instructor. (Taken with MUTH 4301)

4301 Internship I
Through this course, Music Therapy students complete a 1000-hour (minimum) clinical internship at an approved site in the South Texas area. 3 hours if taken in Fall or Spring semesters; 2 hours and 1 hour respectively if taken in Summer I and II. Prerequisite: Completion of coursework for Music Therapy degree, successful completion of the piano improvisation test, and permission of instructor.

4201 Internship II
Through this course, Music Therapy students complete a 900-hour (minimum) clinical internship at an approved site in the South Texas area. 3 hours if taken in Fall or Spring semesters; 2 hours and 1 hour respectively if taken in Summer I and II. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

4101 Internship III
Through this course, Music Therapy students complete a 900-hour (minimum) clinical internship at an approved site in the South Texas area. 3 hours if taken in Fall or Spring semesters; 2 hours and 1 hour respectively if taken in Summer I and II. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

NUCLEAR MEDICINE (NMED)
[Program Description, page 203 ]

3301 Application of Radionuclides I
This course studies the production, properties, and interactions of radionuclides, basic principles of radiation detection and safety, nuclear medicine instrumentation, medical terminology, computer applications and radiopharmaceuticals used for organ visualization/function, and patient care in nuclear medicine. Prerequisites: Admission to the major with completion of biology, chemistry, physics, math, and computer requirements. (Fall)

3305 Application of Radionuclides II
This course is an in-depth study of the current use of radiopharmaceuticals for diagnostic imaging of organ visualization/function, evaluation of results, pathology and therapy for all major organ systems. Prerequisites: NMED 3301. (Spring)

3320 Medical Radiation Safety
This course studies the regulations required by federal and state agencies. Safe handling, storage and disposal of radioactive materials, internal radiation dosimetry, and the use of radiation monitoring instruments. Prerequisites: Admission to the major with completion of biology, chemistry, physics, math, and computer requirements. (Fall)

4210 Introduction to Nuclear Medicine
An introduction to the nuclear medicine profession. The student will develop computer skills useful to nuclear medicine technologists and develop beginning research skills using the Internet. Students will develop a beginning understanding of nuclear medicine procedures and discuss ethical issues in nuclear medicine. No prerequisite. (Fall)

4311 Physics of Medical Imaging and Therapeutics I
The interaction of matter with x-rays, xray production, film processing, and imaging technologies are explored. Prerequisites: Admission to the major with completion of biology, chemistry, physics, math, and computer requirements. (Spring)

4312 Physics of Medical Imaging and Therapeutics II
This course presents further exploration of imaging technologies, including quality assurance and image processing. Prerequisites: NMED 4311. (Fall)

4322 Radiopharmacy, Radiochemistry and Radioimmunoassay
This course examines radionuclide production, mechanisms of radionuclide localization the use and preparation of radiopharmaceuticals for diagnostic and therapeutic applications, quality control of radiopharmaceuticals, and governmental regulations. Prerequisites: NMED 3301 or concurrent enrollment. (Fall)

4341 Radiation Biology/Biophysics
This course is a comprehensive study of the effects of radiation in the body, resulting from radiation interactions. Other areas of focus are genetics, radiosensitivity, radioactive tracers in biological research, and chemical/pharmacological modifiers. Prerequisites: Admission to the major with completion of biology, chemistry, physics, math, and computer requirements. (Spring)

4361 Nuclear Medicine Registry Review
A didactic course taken during the final semester of the senior year to review core competencies, clinical procedures, pathology, radiation safety, instrumentation and radiopharmacy in preparation for the national registry/certification exams. Prerequisites: NMED 3301,3305, 3320, 4210, 4311, 4322, 4341, and 4904.

4604 Clinical Nuclear Medicine I
A clinical course taken during the senior year. This course is an introduction to the nuclear medicine department, its operation and the duties of a Nuclear Medicine technologist. During the clinical practicum the student will assist in performing various diagnostic procedures and computer utilization. Prerequisites: NMED 3301, 3305, 3320, 4210, 4311, 4322, and 4341.

4345 Principles of PET and PET/CT
This course offers an emphasis on the applications of PET and PET/CT imaging. Topics include: image acquisition, detector components and design, image fusion, radionuclide tracer production, tracer localization and their applications, patient preparation and case review. Prerequisites: Senior standing; normally taken concurrently with NMED 4604.

4606 Clinical Nuclear Medicine II
Continuation of the clinical practicum, taken during the final semester of the senior year. This practicum allows the students to enhance their training by performing (with supervision) advanced nuclear medicine procedures. This course also examines health physics by studying radiation exposure rate, radiation contamination, safe handling and storage techniques, and monitoring equipment as well as all aspects of a Nuclear Pharmacy, such as preparation and quality control testing of radiopharmaceuticals, performing assays, low level lab procedures, and operation of special equipment. Prerequisites: NMED 4904.

4350 Disaster Management and the Nuclear Medicine Technologist
An investigation of the current JCAHO, Federal and State guidelines pertaining to the use of radioactivity and bioterrorism. The primary focus is the role of the nuclear medicine technologist in disaster management and decontamination using current OSHA and Homeland Security guidelines.

NURSING (NURS)
[Program Description, page 195]

2213 Basic Health Assessment
Generic. Focus on theory and skills of health assessment, including health history and physical examination. Selected principles applied in simulated laboratory. Prerequisite: Admission to the major.

2310 Integrated Health Science I
Generic. Survey of body systems with focus on pathophysiology related to cellular function, immune response, gastrointestinal and integumentary systems. Relevant diagnostics, pharmacological, and treatment modalities integrated throughout course. Prerequisites: Admission to nursing or nuclear medicine major.

2312 Nursing and Health
Generic. Focus on concepts basic to nursing: scope of practice, nursing process and health. Prerequisite: Admission to the major.

2520 Nursing Technologies
Generic. The focus of this course is on the development of clinical skills necessary for safe nursing practice. Emphasis is placed on nursing process, scientific rationale, delegation, standard precautions and communication skills related to the patient medical record. Prerequisites: Admission to the major.

3215 Integrated Health Science III
Generic. Pathophysiology related to respiratory, renal and neurological systems, including acid-base regulation. Relevant diagnostics, pharmacological, and treatment modalities integrated throughout course. Prerequisites: NURS 3310.

3310 Integrated Health Science II
Generic. Pathophysiology related to the cardiovascular, blood, endocrine, hepatobiliary, and reproductive systems. Relevant diagnostics, pharmacological, and treatment modalities are integrated throughout the course. Prerequisites: NURS 2310.

3322 Issues in Nursing
RN-BSN. Examines professional obligations for continuing development and contemporary issues affecting nursing and health care policy. Intensive Writing. Prerequisites: NURS 3512 Professional Nursing Role.

3341 Health Promotion and Disease Prevention
Generic and RN-BSN. Examines the role of the professional nurse in health maintenance, promotion and disease prevention. A service-learning course. Prerequisites: completion of first semester nursing courses.

3512 Professional Nursing Role
RN-BSN. Introduction to the roles of the professional nurse and to basic concepts of professional nursing. Includes clinical practicum. Successful completion of NURS 3412 may be used as a method for validating prior nursing knowledge. Prerequisites: Admission RN-BSN Pathway.


3530 Nursing of Children and Adults II
Generic. Nursing care of adults and children experiencing health problems that are either severe alterations of a single system or alterations that affect multiple systems. Includes clinical practicum. Prerequisites: completion of second semester nursing courses.

3630 Nursing of Children and Adults I
Generic. Nursing care of adults and children experiencing health problems with predictable outcomes. Includes clinical practicum. Prerequisites: completion of first semester nursing courses.

4182 Senior Seminar
Generic. Focuses on the synthesis of nursing knowledge developed during the first four semesters of the generic program by helping students prepare for the NCLEX-RN licensing exam. This course is to be taken in the final semester of the nursing program.

4265 Community Health Nursing Practicum
RN-BSN. Clinical application of the knowledge and skills of community health nursing. Prerequisite or concurrent enrollment: NURS 4365.

4313 Health Assessment
RN-BSN. Focus is on the theory and skills of health assessment, including health history and physical assessment. Includes laboratory. Prerequisites: admission to the RN-BSN Pathway.

4322 Research and Issues in Nursing
Generic. Focus is developing foundations and strategies for applying the evidence-based practice paradigm to solving clinical problems. Application of the research process to issues affecting nursing and health care are examined. Prerequisites: Senior standing; Statistics.


4331 Research in Nursing
RN-BSN. Focus is on application of the principles of evidence-based practice to clinical practice problems. Writing intensive. Prerequisite: Statistics.

4332 Nursing Leadership/Management
RN-BSN. Focus is on the role of the professional nurse as manager and leader. Prerequisites: Admission to RN-BSN Pathway.

4362 Practicum in Leadership/Management
RN-BSN. Focus is on clinical application of the knowledge and skills of nursing management and leadership. Prerequisite or concurrent enrollment: NURS 4332.

4365 Community Health Nursing
RN-BSN. Nursing care for families and communities. Principles of public health, including epidemiology, are introduced. Prerequisites: NURS 3341.

4388 Nursing Internship
Generic. Intensive clinical course with focus on role transition from student to professional nurse and skill acquisition in selected clinical specialty. Prerequisites: completion of fourth semester nursing courses.

4431 Mental Health Nursing
Generic. Nursing care of clients experiencing acute and chronic major mental health problems. Includes clinical practicum. Prerequisites: completion of third semester nursing courses.

4532 Nursing Leadership/Management
Generic. Focus is on the knowledge and skills required to function in the role of nurse manager and leader. Includes clinical practicum. Prerequisites: completion of fourth semester nursing courses.
4541 Nursing of Childbearing Families
Generic. Nursing care of the childbearing family, including both normal and complicated pregnancy and care of the newborn. Includes clinical practicum. Prerequisites: completion of second semester nursing courses.

4551 Nursing in Complex Situations
Generic. Nursing care of adults and children experiencing severe health problems affecting multiple systems with highly unpredictable outcomes and requiring significant medical and nursing support. Includes clinical practicum. Prerequisites: completion of third semester nursing courses.

4562 Community Health Nursing
Generic. Focus is on nursing care for families and communities. Principles of public health, including epidemiology, are introduced. Includes clinical practicum. Prerequisites: completion of fourth semester nursing courses.

NUTRITION (NUTR)
[Program Description, page 180]

1102 Introduction to Dietetics
This course presents the development of a body of knowledge that describes the dimensions of dietetics and nutrition-related professions as practice disciplines. (Fall)

1223 Gourmet Cuisine
This course studies the preparation of foods with emphasis on nutritional values, cultural, and ethnic influences and aesthetic appeal. Fee. (Fall and Spring)

1224 International Cuisine
This course will strengthen the student’s culinary skills and emphasize the impact of culture, history, regional, differences, religion, and ethnicity on food preparation, food preferences, and presentation. Prerequisite: NUTR 1223 or NUTR 2231. Fee. (Spring)

2131 Food Preparation Laboratory
This course involves the application of scientific principles in use and preparation of selected food products. Must be taken concurrently with NUTR 3231. Fee. (Fall)

2231 Principles of Food Preparation
This course presents fundamental principles in the selection and preparation of foods and an introduction to chemical principles and reactions involved. Prerequisite: 1 semester Chemistry. Must be taken concurrently with NUTR 2131. (Fall)

2341 Introduction to Nutrition
This course examines principles of normal human nutrition, including major nutritional problems; the relation of nutrition to mental and physical development; food habits and the cultural, social, and psychological influences upon them. Prerequisite: 3 semester hours in chemistry or biology. (Fall, Spring)

3134 Food Systems Management Laboratory
In this course, students explore food systems management with emphasis on quantity food production, kitchen layout, and design. Must be taken concurrently with NUTR 3234. Fee. (Spring)

3232 Experimental Foods
This course involves a critical analysis of modern food production and preservation methods. Integration of fundamental knowledge of food principles with theory and current research. Research and good science principles are applied in the development of an individual experimental food project. Prerequisite: NUTR 2131, 2231. Fee. (Spring)

3342 Nutrition in the Life Cycle
An examination of nutrition assessment, nutrient requirements, malnutrition, and nutrition intervention prior to conception and during pregnancy, lactation, infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood, and aging. Prerequisite: NUTR 2341. (Fall odd-numbered years)

3410 Food Recovery and Gleaning
The investigation of food assistance systems at various levels in the community setting. Focus on methods of procurement, inventory control, distribution systems, and food safety. Prerequisite: Dimensions of Wellness. (Spring)

3433 Food and Nutrition Services Management I
This course is an introduction to the principles and procedures basic to the management of human and financial resources in food and nutrition services systems. The course content concentrates on trends, management processes, systems theory, decision-making, leadership and motivation theories, marketing process, employee training, quality and productivity, and information systems related to food and nutrition services. Lecture, lab. (Fall)

4100 Seminar in Wellness Services
This course studies current approaches in the delivery of wellness services and includes presentations and case study reviews. It is only for students active in the Nutrition Services Program. Prerequisite: Instructor approval. (Fall)

4136 Seminar in Nutrition
This course explores current advances in Nutrition by studying selected special topics of discussion or areas of interest. Prerequisite: NUTR 2341.

4239 Nutritional Practicum
This course provides the student with individual field experience in one of the areas in nutrition and dietetics. Prerequisite: senior standing and permission of instructor. Fee. (Fall, Spring)

4335 Nutrition Education and Counseling
This course examines the major learning theories, teaching strategies, counseling and their application to education, including the study of techniques used in group and individual dynamics affecting the outcome of nutrition education. Prerequisites: NUTR 2341, 3 semester hours of Behavioral Sciences. Lecture, lab. Fee. (Spring even-numbered years).

4340 Clinical and Nutritional
Assessment In this course, direct and indirect assessment of the nutritional status of individuals and groups are covered. This includes anthropometric, biochemical, clinical, dietary, and environmental components. The experimental approach is designed to arouse the student’s interest in the physiological and biochemical methods used in the science of nutrition. Prerequisites: NUTR 2341, CHEM 1302/1102. Lecture, lab. Fee. (Fall) 4356 Nutrition and Human Performance This course is a study of nutrition and the interrelationship with work physiology, including bionutritional influences on physiology, physical assessment and cardiac rehabilitation. Prerequisite: NUTR 2341 (Spring odd-numbered years)

4356 Nutrition and Human Performance
This course is a study of nutrition and the interrelationship with work physiology, including bionutritional influences on physiology, physical assessment and cardiac rehabilitation. Prerequisite: NUTR 2341 (Spring odd-numbered years)

4388 Internship in Non-profit Management
Practical work experience in community food or apparel assistance program. Students will have the opportunity to participate in the managerial activities associated with the operation of a non-profit assistance program. Prerequisite: Completion of BINF 2325, FMGT 3444, BFIN 3340, NUTR 3410. May be taken at the same time as BMGT 4351.

4460 Community and World Nutrition
Environmental dimensions of human nutrition problems in contemporary society are explored. Assessment of community needs and resources included. Identification of international, federal, state, and local community programs focused on improving human nutritional status. (Fall)

4470 Human Nutrition and Metabolism
This class covers physiological function, metabolic rate, and interactions of nutrients and factors influencing the utilization of nutrients in humans. Students analyze and interpret nutrition literature utilizing library research. (Fall)

4475 Clinical Nutrition
Modern concepts of clinical nutrition and abnormalities treated by modification of the diet. Factors affecting the acceptance of modified diets. Critical evaluation of diet patterns in use. (Spring)

ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT (ORGD)
[See Business section ORGD Program, page 157]

3340 Organizational Development
This course presents the research, practice and ethics relevant to organizational development, including: consulting skills, tools and techniques for analyzing problems, developing, implementing and evaluating organizational development interventions, and ethical issues at each stage of the consulting process. Prerequisites: BMGT 3340, BMGT 3354 and BMGT 4355.

3360 Teambuilding in Organizations
This course presents the research and practice relevant to improving teamwork in organizations for permanent work groups, temporary project teams and virtual teams, for a variety of purposes, including: improving productivity, clarifying roles, resolving conflict and adapting to change. Prerequisites: BMGT 3340, BMGT 3354, BMGT 4355, and ORGD 3340.

3370 Total Quality Management
This course presents the research and practice relevant to employee involvement programs, in particular, TQM, continuous improvement and six-aigma approaches o improving organizational processes, products and services. Prerequisites: BMGT 3340, BMGT 3354, BMGT 4355, and ORGD 3340.

3380 Work Design
This Course presents the research and practice relevant to designing jobs and work groups that are both satisfying and productive, including engineering, motivational and sociotechnical systems approaches. Prerequisites: BMGT 3340, BMGT 3354, BMGT 4355, and ORGD 3340.

3350 Organizational Surveys
This course presents the research practice and ethics relevant to the use of surveys in organizations, including: analysis and diagnosis of problems; development, administration, and analysis of surveys; presentation of survey results to clients; and the use of survey feedback to facilitate change in organizations. Prerequisites: BINF 2325, BMDS 3370, BMDS 3371, BMGT 3340, BMGT 3354 and ORGD 3340.

4350 Leadership in Organizations
This course presents the research and practice relevant to leadership in organizations, including: theories of leadership, leadership styles, leadership roles and activities, and skills necessary for effective leadership. Prerequisite: BMGT 3340, BMGT 3354 and BMGT 4355

4360 Organizational Consulting
This course presents the fundamentals of OD consulting both as an internal and external consultant, including: the consulting process, tactic and strategies, client management, and ethics of consulting. Prerequisites: BMGT 3340, BMGT 3354, BMGT 4355 and ORGD 3340.

4380 Capstone in Organizational Development
This is the final course for the BA in Organizational Development. It is an integrative, problem-solving course in which the expertise gained in the major are applied to organizational situations through actual project work or case studies.a. Prerequisite: Completion of all major requirement for the Bachelor of Arts in OD.

Pre-Pharmacy
[Program Description, page 151]
Coursework under other disciplines is described respectively.

PHAR 1105 Professional (Applied) Development Skills (PADS-I)
The first in a series of 3 linked courses designed to introduce the student to the profession of pharmacy. This course will focus on the history and development of pharmacy and pharmacy education in the United States. An introduction to the concept of pharmaceutical care will be included. Subsequent courses build on the previous one.

PHAR 2105 Professional (Applied) Development Skills (PADS II)
The second in a series of 3 linked courses designed to introduce the student to the profession of pharmacy. This course will focus on the United States health care system and the role of the pharmacist. Basic communications skills with patients will be taught and practiced in this course. Subsequent courses build on the previous one.

PHAR 2110 Professional (Applied) Development Skills (PADS III)
The third in a series of 3 linked courses designed to introduce the student to the profession of pharmacy. The overall theme is of developing professional skills through concepts of medical terminology and basic pharmaceutical calculations. Self-assessment and independent study using blackboard and other techniques are tied to group discussion and faculty feedback on progress.

PHILOSOPHY (PHIL)
[Program Description, page 122]

1381 Introduction to Philosophy
This is an introduction to philosophical problems, methods, and areas of interest. Topics may include the nature of reality, theory of knowledge, the existence and nature of God, the idea of beauty, personal and social ethics, political philosophy, the mind-body problem, freedom and determinism, and personal identity. Note: PHIL 1381 is a prerequisite for all upper Division philosophy courses. (Fall, Spring, and Summer as needed)

3312 Logic
This course presents a problem solving/ issues approach to the study of both informal and formal logic, focusing upon tools, techniques and principles for the analysis and evaluation of reasoning. This course includes a study of the rules of inference, including deduction and induction, and rules for definition, emphasizing evaluation of the validity and soundness of arguments as well as recognition of common fallacies of reasoning. Prerequisite: PHIL 1381. (Fall, Spring)

3315 Philosophy of Human Nature
This course is a philosophical examination of the meaning and destiny of human being. Topics may include the uniqueness of the human being, embodiment, spirituality, personal identity, cognition, intersubjectivity, determinism, freedom and responsibility, and death and immortality. Prerequisite: PHIL 1381. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective. (Spring, odd-numbered years or as needed)

3320 Philosophy of Love
This course is a philosophical examination of the nature and significance of love. Using classical and contemporary philosophical readings as well as varioustreatments of love in literature and film, topics may include the nature of romantic love, the distinction between eros and agape, love and personal identity, love and gender, love and sexuality, love and spirituality, and/or multicultural visions of the nature and significance of love. Prerequisite: PHIL 1381. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective. (Summers or as needed)

3325 Philosophy of Culture
This course introduces students to a variety of theoretical approaches to the study of culture, including visual theory, literary theory, and performance theory. Attention will be paid to the contexts in which these cultural representations are produced and in which they circulate. Students will investigate how visual, textual and performative discourses create and contest social borders, replicate cultures, and negotiate power dynamics. Students will examine case studies from the fine and performing arts, film, literary texts, advertising, etc. Prerequisite: PHIL 1381. (Spring or as needed)

3318 Theories of Reality and Knowledge
This course is an advanced examination of theories of reality and knowledge and their interrelations. Topics may include the nature of being, substance, causality, change and becoming, possibility and actuality, materialism and idealism, the nature and scope of human knowledge, skepticism, criteria and methods of certainty, rationalism and empiricism, and the nature of truth. Prerequisite: PHIL 1381. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective. (Spring)

3332 Ethics
This course is an introduction to personal and social ethics. Topics may include ethical theory, the nature and scope of ethical discourse, the concepts of the good, virtue, duty, and responsibility, civil authority, international law, and the state and religion. Prerequisite: PHIL 1381. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective. (Fall Spring)


3333 Applied Ethics
This course examines contemporary moral and ethical issues in various areas. Topics may include business ethics, bioethics, professional ethics, environmental ethics, animal rights, poverty and hunger, war and peace, sexual discrimination, or other areas of interest. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Prerequisite: PHIL 1381. (Fall, odd-numbered years or as needed)

3351 Ancient Philosophy
This course is a survey of ancient Greek philosophy with emphasis on the major philosophical themes explored by the Presocratics, Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle. Prerequisite: PHIL 1381. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective. (Fall)

3352 Medieval Philosophy
This course is a survey of Western Philosophy during the Middle Ages, including, among others, the thought of St. Augustine, St. Anselm, Roger Bacon, St. Thomas Aquinas, and William of Occam. Prerequisite: PHIL 1381. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective. (Spring)

3353 Modern Philosophy
This course is a survey of Western Philosophy from the seventeenth to the nineteenth centuries: Descartes, Spinoza, Liebniz, Berkeley, Hume, Kant, and post- Kantian Idealism. Prerequisite: PHIL 1381. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective. (Fall)

3354 Contemporary Philosophy
This course is a survey of Western Philosophy from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. Topics may include Marxism, positivism, American pragmatism, process philosophy, analytic philosophy, phenomenology, existentialism, and/or more recent developments. Prerequisite: PHIL 1381. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective. (Spring)

3355 World Philosophy
This course is an introduction to major philosophical traditions around the world, which may include Japanese, Chinese, South Asian, Arabic, Persian, American Indian, Latin American, African, and Western philosophy. Prerequisite: PHIL 1381. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective. (Fall)

3365 Philosophy of Religion
This course is a philosophical examination of religious beliefs and practices. Topics may include the origin and modes of religious life, faith and reason, the existence and nature of God, religious language and symbol, mysticism and theology, religious experience and verification, the problem of evil, immortality, miracles, religion and morality. Prerequisite: PHIL 1381. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective. (Fall, even-numbered years or as needed)

3370 Philosophy of Science and Technology
This course is a critical survey of philosophical problems and themes in science and technology. Topics may include scientific methodology, the status of scientific truth claims in the total array of human knowledge, metaphysical interpretations of the physics of space and time, biological and evolutionary approaches to human nature and to nature as such, ethical and political responsibilities of scientific research, and the impact of technology as a force that guides human understanding, human values, and human destiny. Prerequisite: PHIL 1381. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective. (Spring, odd-numbered years)

3375 Aesthetics: Philosophy of Art and Beauty
This course is a philosophical examination of the world and nature of art and the nature and significance of aesthetic experience. Topics may include the definition of art, the idea of beauty, aesthetic value and experience, the nature of the creative process, form versus content, expressiveness, symbolism, the role of theory in aesthetics, art criticism, art and religion, art and morality, art and science, and art and the community. Prerequisite: PHIL 1381. (May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective. Spring, even-numbered years or as needed)

3385 Justice: Tradition and Transformation
This course is a philosophical exploration of the concept of justice with emphasis on its role in the foundation of governments, and the structures of society as well as its significance as a personal value. Topics may include the role of justice in the ideal state, the Judeo-Christian conception of justice, the nature of injustice, of social justice, of freedom, law, and personal integrity, the rights of the individual, and the meaning of equality. Prerequisite: PHIL 1381. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective. (Fall, even-numbered years or as needed)

3390 Philosophy of Black Music
This course utilizes the history of African-American music as a means of exploring the history of African-American culture. Using music as a mirror that reflects the principal experiences, values, and
aspirations of African-Americans, the course examines the spirituals (as a reflection of slavery), the blues (as a reflection of post-emancipation life), jazz, gospel, and rhythm and blues (as reflections of the growing complexity of the African-American diaspora), soul music and funk (as reflections of the civil rights movement), and hip hop and rap (as reflections of post-industrial, contemporary black culture). Prerequisite: PHIL 1381. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective. (Fall, odd-numbered years)

3395 Feminist Philosophy
This course is a philosophical study of the condition of women. The oppression of women is analyzed in terms of its causes, and in terms of what would be required to overcome it from various philosophical viewpoints such as liberalism, socialism, existentialism, psychoanalysis, and radical feminism. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective. Prerequisite: PHIL 1381. (Spring, even-numbered years or as needed)

4371 Special Topics
The contents of this course will be determined by faculty and/or students to fill special needs or interests. The course will focus on the writings of an individual philosopher or an area of interest (e.g. philosophy of literature, philosophy of language, philosophy of mind, philosophy of law, American philosophy, phenomenology, and existentialism). May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Prerequisite: PHIL 1381. (As needed)

PHYSICS (PHYS)
[Program Description, page 182]

1111 Physics Laboratory I
This course is the laboratory that accompanies PHYS 1301 and PHYS 2305. Prerequisite: Credit for or enrolled in PHYS 1301 or PHYS 2305. Fee. (Fall)

1112 Physics Laboratory II
This course is the laboratory that accompanies PHYS 1302 and PHYS 2306. Prerequisite: PHYS 1301, PHYS 1111 or PHYS 2305, PHYS 1111, and credit for or enrolled in PHYS 1302 or PHYS 2306. Fee. (Spring)

1301 General Physics I
This course is a study of mechanics, gravitation, fluids, heat, and thermal properties of matter. Prerequisite: MATH 1304. (Fall)

1302 General Physics II
This course is a study of waves and wave properties, sound, fundamentals of electricity and magnetism, properties of light, optics. Prerequisite: PHYS 1301. (Spring)


2305 Physics I
This course is a study of the basic concepts of motion, energy, work, momentum, gravitation, fluids, heat, and thermal properties of matter. Prerequisite: MATH 2312, or enrolled in MATH 2312. (Fall)

2306 Physics II
This course is a study of the basic concepts of wave motion and wave phenomena, sound, electricity, magnetism, light, optics, and modern physics. Prerequisite: PHYS 2305. (Spring)

2408 Physical Science and Laboratory
This course provides the basic understanding of elementary physics and chemistry with an applied emphasis, and includes the application of scientific problem-solving processes and laboratory skills. Students learn methods of teaching science, higher-order thinking, and creativity in problem solving. This course is designed for non-science majors. Prerequisite: MATH 1304 or equivalent. Fee.

3311 Modern Physics
This course is an introduction to quantum mechanics that includes Schrödinger wave equation, symmetries and conservation laws, subatomic particles, strong and weak interactions. Prerequisite: PHYS 2306, 2106, MATH 3314. (Every other year)

4342 Radiation Biophysics
This course studies natural and induced radiation, series decay relationships, radioactive equilibrium, dosimetry, biological and medical applications. Prerequisite: PHYS 2306, 2106, 3311, MATH 3314.

4344 Nuclear Physics
This course is a study of the general properties of atomic nuclei and of the nuclear force that holds them together. It includes analysis of stable and unstable nuclei, and examination of the nuclear processes of fission and fusion. Prerequisite: PHYS 2306, 2106, MATH 3314.

POLITICAL SCIENCE (POLS)
[Program Description, page 110]

1315 American Politics
This course is a survey of US national government. It is designed to provide the student with an understanding of the foundations, constitutions and processes of their national government. The major institutions of the national government will be examined in order to gain an understanding of how they work, the role of the people in the political system and the consequences of a democratic political system. The success (and lack there of) of some groups to influence government and obtain benefits from it will be considered in an effort to evaluate the workings of a democratic system.

1316 State and Local Politics
This course examines a public policy approach to the examination of Texas government and politics through a public policy approach. This course fulfills TEA teacher certification requirements.

1391 Human Rights
This course studies individual, group, and society rights; the basis of a just society; and the meaning of equality. This course will also examine the theoretical and philosophic underpinnings of justice as well as examine the extent to which society is just and how to promote greater justice.

2300 Social Science Research Methods
In this course, students design and analyze research problems in the social sciences. This course is an introduction to the methods of social science research with emphasis on research design and data analysis. Prerequisite: POLS 1315, POLS 3312 or PSYC 3381 and at least 6 semester hours of upper division courses in the major.

2305 Introduction to Political Studies
This course is designed to introduce the student to the professional standards and expectations of Political Science. The course focuses on the process of developing political arguments, discovery and evaluation of sources, as well as oral and written presentation of political science material.

2310 Comparative Politics
This course is designed to serve as an introduction to the comparative study of political systems. Students will develop a core body of knowledge concerning various political regions of the world. Students will also learn what the comparative method is and how to apply it to the study of different political systems. Students will also be introduced to the political systems of selected nation-states around the world. Prerequisite: POLS 1315.

2320 International Relations
This course is designed to introduce the student to the different approaches to the study of relations between sovereign nations. The study of international relations covers many topics, from the study of war and peace, to world government and the conduct of trade between nations. An emphasis will be placed on how nations relate to each other politically and how politics affects such things as economics and human rights. Prerequisite: POLS 1315.

2350 Environmental Politics
This course will focus on the history and politics of the international and American environmental movements. Students will also develop an understanding of environmental policy making at both the domestic and international level. Prerequisite: POLS 1315. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective.

2375 International Organizations
This course introduces students to the study of international organizations, primarily the United Nations and its specialized agencies. It will examine such topics as the predecessors and origins of the UN, its basic principles and structure, problems of war and peace, major contemporary issues of world politics, international law and non-governmental actors. Students should leave the course with a better understanding of the place of international organizations in the contemporary world system. Prerequisites: POLS 1315 and POLS 2320.

2376 Model Organization of American States
In this course students will study the structure and function of the Organization of American States and learn and apply parliamentary procedure in a simulation setting. Students are cast as high-level negotiators on issues of international importance. Working together on “country-teams,” students model real-world interactions between states. The simulation is conducted on two levels: deliberations within country-teams and negotiations between country-teams. The teams then communicate their policies to the other country-teams in a three-day simulation. Prerequisite: POLS 1315, POLS 2320, and POLS 2375.

2392 Nature and Function of Law
This course is designed to introduce the student to the workings, organization, and impacts of the judicial system in the United States. Courts throughout the world are given the responsibility to determine guilt or innocence or to make decisions concerning civil controversies. Courts can make their decisions in such a way as to influence, if not make, public policy. Courts in the United States can also determine the constitutionality of laws created by legislative and executive bodies, giving courts greater policy making powers if they choose to use them. Emphasis will be placed on examining the policy impacts of the courts. Prerequisite: POLS 1315.

3300 U.S. Congress
This course is designed to introduce the student to the study of Congress and congressional behavior in the American political system. The course will cover representation, selection of legislators, organization and procedures of legislative bodies, and the relation of the legislative to the executive and judicial branches. By the end of the semester, the student should have an understanding of how legislatures function, how and why legislators behave as they do, and how legislatures relate to the other branches of the government as well as to constituents. Prerequisite: POLS 1315.

3305 Presidency
This course is designed to introduce the student to the theory, organization, and behavior of the American presidency. Comparisons to state governors and executives in other nations will be made but the emphasis will be on the American president. By the end of the semester the student should understand what constitutes an executive, how executives behave, how executives interact with other branches of government and with other executives, and how they affect people and institutions. Prerequisite: POLS 1315.

3350 European Politics
This course is designed to serve as an introduction to the study of politics in Europe. Students will develop a core body of knowledge concerning the political systems in Europe. Students will also be introduced to the political systems of selected nation-states in Europe. Prerequisites: POLS 1315 and POLS 2310 or POLS 2320. 3353 Texas Legislative Process.
This course examines how the Texas legislative branch functions. It is offered every two years in May during the legislative session in Austin. Prerequisite: POLS 1315 and POLS 1316.

3356 Terrorism and Conflict in the International Arena
This course is designed to study the causes of war and terrorism. Students will also examine what we need to know to prevent war if possible, and prepare for it when necessary. Students will finally examine the extent to which wars are the purposeful, rational pursuit of policy, the result of miscalculation and misperception, or the result of forces over which there is little control. Prerequisites: POLS 1315 and POLS 2310 or POLS 2320. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective.

3371 Political Theory
This is a survey of political ideas from the Greeks to John Rawls, particularly as those ideas influence American political development. The course includes classical thinkers, writers of the Enlightenment, and modern political theories. Prerequisite: POLS 1315. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective.

4315 Constitutional Law and Politics
This course explores judicial interpretations of fundamental U.S. Constitutional issues using the case study method. Emphasis will be placed on basic issues of federalism, civil liberties, civil rights, and property rights. Economic, sociological, and psychological factors in judicial behavior will also be examined. Prerequisite: POLS 1315 and POLS 2392.

4317 Public Policy
This course examines the causes and effects of governmental policy making, including theories of decision-making and an exploration of the impact of policy on people and institutions. This course also examines political decision making within an ethical framework. Emphasis is on the impact of political decisions on minorities and the underclass. Prerequisite: POLS 1315.

4321 US Foreign Policy
This course examines the formation, implementation and implications of American Foreign Policy. The major problems and challenges facing the international community and US reaction to and influence on these problems will also be examined. Primary emphasis will be placed on the post WWII era.

4325 Political Behavior
This course studies the nature of and major influences on public attitudes, the measurement of public opinion, the role of public opinion in government and campaigns, and the impact of media on political campaigns. Prerequisite: POLS 1315. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective.

4330 International Law
This course examines the development and application of the rules that nations recognize as governing their relationships with one another. Prerequisite: POLS 1315 and POLS 2392.

4335 Comparative Political Parties
This course is designed to introduce the student to the basic theories and concepts of political parties in the United States and around the world. Particular emphasis will be placed on the political party system in Texas in comparative perspective. Prerequisites: POLS 1315 and POLS 2310.

4355 Politics of Developing Areas
This course is a general introduction to the study of social and political change and conflict in developing areas of the world. It seeks both to point up the wide diversity of the developing countries around the world in their approaches to social, economic, and political change. Emphasis will be placed on such issues as who governs, the role of the military in politics under different types of regimes, and causes of military intervention, revolution, and transitions to democracy. Prerequisites: POLS 1315 and POLS 2310. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective.

4363 Political Globalization
This course explores the interrelatedness of issues such as food, energy, population, arms race, East/West, and North/South confrontations. It examines alternative world order models. May be cross-referenced with HIST 4363. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective.

POLS 4385 Topics in American Politics
This course is an advanced study in political science focusing on American politics. The course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Prerequisite: POLS 1315.

POLS 4387 Topics in Comparative Politics/International Relations
This course is an advanced study in political science focusing on comparative politics or international relations. The course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective. Prerequisites: POLS 1315 and POLS 2310 or POLS 2320.

4390 Political Issues Seminar.
This course offers students an opportunity to receive UIW credit for
participating in intensive academic seminars offered off campus. Students must have
permission of the Discipline Coordinator before applying for the seminar, and may be required to complete additional work beyond that assigned in the seminar. It may be repeated once for credit when topics vary, but only 3 hours may be counted toward fulfillment of the requirements for the major or minor in Political Science. Prerequisite: POLS 1315.


4391 Political Internship I
This course provides approved internships designed to give qualified students career experience. Credit hours earned depend on number of hours worked as intern. Instructor’s permission required. Prerequisite: POLS 1315.

4691 Political Internship II
This course provides approved internships designed to give qualified students career experience. Credit hours earned depend on number of hours worked as intern. Instructor’s permission required. Prerequisite: POLS 1315.

4692 Political Internship II
This course provides internships in Washington, D.C. It is available only to juniors and seniors. This course may only be taken concurrently with POLS 4691. May not count toward fulfillment of the requirements for the major. Instructor’s permission required. Prerequisite: POLS 1315.

PSYCHOLOGY (PSYC)
[Program Description, page 113]

1301 Introduction to Psychology
This course studies the basic facts and principles of psychology. (Fall, Spring)

2370 Child and Adolescent Development
This course examines the physical, cognitive, and psychosocial aspects of child development from conception through adolescence. Prerequisite PSYC 1301. (Fall, Spring)

2380 Biology and Behavior
This course provides a fundamental understanding of how biological processes relate to human behavior. Prerequisite PSYC 1301. (Spring)

3330 Human Sexuality
This course studies the basic theories and principles of sexuality: cognitive, emotional, social, and moral. A developmental approach is followed, beginning with conception and progressing through infancy, childhood, adolescence, young adulthood, middle age, and late life. (Fall, Spring)

3331 Abnormal Psychology
This course examines the psychology of normality and variations, including character disorders, substance abuse, sexual deviations, neuroses, psychoses, techniques, and theories. Prerequisite: PSYC 1301 and 3 semester hours of PSYC). (Fall, Spring)

3351 Social Psychology
This course studies individual behavior and attitudes as influenced by other individual and groups, and considers conformity, mass media, attitude formation and change, attraction, aggression, prejudice, and behavior in groups. Cross-referenced with SOC 3351. Prerequisite PSYC 1301 or SOC 1311. (Fall)

3353 Personality
This course studies the theories of personality, with current research and applications to adult life. It explores therapeutic techniques of theorists, and examines growth and mental health of adult personality changes. Prerequisite PSYC 1301. (Spring)

3370 Adult Development and Aging
This course examines the biological, cognitive, and psychosocial aspects of human behavior and abilities that occur from young adulthood through late adulthood. Prerequisite PSYC 1301. (Fall, Spring)

3372 Learning
This course will examine the various models and theories that demonstrate how experience explains and shapes behavior. Prerequisite PSYC 1301 and 3 semester hours of Psychology. (Spring)

3376 Cognition and Memory
This course provides an understanding of the process of thinking, knowing, problem-solving, and mentally processing information. The course examines the mental system for receiving, storing, organizing, altering, and recovering information. Prerequisite PSYC 1301 and 3 semester hours of Psychology. (Fall)

3381 Statistics for Behavioral Sciences
This course examines common behavioral science statistical techniques such as frequency distributions, measures of central tendency, variability, correlation and tests of significance, chi-square, and non-parametric tests. Cross-referenced with SOCI 3381. Prerequisites MATH 1304 or permission of instructor. (Fall, Spring)

3384 Research Methods
This course explores how the scientific method is applied in the behavioral and social sciences. The course will examine descriptive, experimental, and applied research methodology . Ethical issues involved in conducting research will also be discussed. (Cross-referenced with SOC 3384). Prerequisites: PSYC 1301 or SOC 1311, and PSYC 3381 or SOC 3381. (Fall, Spring)

3385 Multicultural Issues
This survey course examines how psychological theory applies in multicultural contexts. The course also examines professional and social issues of psychotherapy, including ethics and public policy. This is a writing intensive course. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective. Prerequisites PSYC 1301. (Fall)

4320 Health Psychology
This course provides a scientific study of the ways in which psychological principles can be used to prevent and treat illness and promote health. This course examines how behaviors relate to health enhancement, disease prevention, safety, and rehabilitation. Prerequisites PSYC 1301, and 6 semester hours of Psychology OR permission of instructor. (Spring)

4330 Developmental Psychopathology
This course examines interventions for youth at-risk. Teenage pregnancy, violence, dropping out of school, depression, and substance abuse are presented in terms of understanding, and strategies for helping at home, school and residential settings. Anxiety, child abuse, fears, and anger solutions are also presented. Strategies of problem solving and self-worth building are among the skills that will be learned. Prerequisite: PSYC 1301, PSYC 2370, and PSYC 3331. (Spring)

4331 History of Psychology
This courses examines the historical antecedents of psychology, including the origins of the various perspectives and schools of thought offered in psychology. Prerequisites: PSYC 1301 and 9 semester hours of upper division psychology courses. (Spring)

4332 Theories of Psychotherapy
This course is a survey of the various psychological techniques used to facilitate positive changes in an individual’s personality, behavior, or adjustment. Group therapies will also be examined. Prerequisites: PSYC 1301, PSYC 3331, and any 3 semester hours of psychology credit, or permission of instructor. (Fall, Spring)

4359 Directed Practicum/Internship
This course is an educationally directed program under the supervision of faculty and agency professionals, offering an opportunity to acquire skills through experience, and to apply skills acquired in the classroom. It requires a minimum of 140 field hours; May be repeated once, for a total of 6 semester hours. Prerequisites: Junior or Senior PSYC Majors, PSYC 1301, PSYC 3331, and permission of instructor. (Fall, Spring)

RELIGIOUS STUDIES (RELS)
[Program Description, page 116]

1310 Introduction to Theology
This course introduces students both to the content of Christian faith (salvation, grace, Jesus, etc.) and to the variety of ways in which this content has been shaped and expressed throughout Christian history. (Fall, Spring)

1340 Understanding Catholicism
This course is an overview of the beliefs, structures and worship of the Roman Catholic Church. We will investigate the cultural, theological and political development of a variety of topics, including but not limited to the following: ecclesiology, Christology, morality, incarnation, revelation and scripture. (Fall, Spring)

1345 Biblical Themes
This course reviews various contemporary themes in relationship to both the Hebrew Scriptures (Old Testament) and the Christian Scriptures (New Testament), with an emphasis on interpretation and methodological approaches (i.e., historical criticism, literary criticism, and cultural studies). (Fall, Spring)

1355 History of Christianity
This course presents an historical Dimension of Christianity: the community of believers and their beliefs, rites and symbols, and major figures and events up to the sixteenth century. Emphasis is on the historical development of the Church and its doctrines. (Fall, Spring)

1360 Christian Ethics
This course presents an understanding of Christian and particularly Catholic arguments and reasoning concerning a variety of moral issues. Emphasis is given to the sources of Catholic moral thought and the development of moral conscience. Some of the topics to be discussed include the death penalty, abortion, sexuality, and economic injustice. (Fall, Spring)

1375 Prayer and Spirituality
This course studies prayer in biblical tradition, prayer in the life of major Christian spiritual authors, and contemporary spirituality and prayer. (Fall, Spring)

2320 Hebrew Scriptures
This course surveys the history, literature, and faith of ancient Israel found in the Hebrew Scriptures (Old Testament), with an emphasis on interpretation and methodological approaches (e.g., historical criticism, literary criticism, and cultural studies). (Fall, Spring)

2329 Religious Movements in United States History
This course is a study of religious and racial/ethnic cultural ideologies and traditions in the United States, and assessment of their influence on U.S. life and institutions. (Spring)

2330 Religion, Values, and Film
This course presents a systematic study of the representation of religion and values in contemporary North American film, a medium, which is becoming increasingly important as a vehicle by which cultural values are shaped and exchanged. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective. (Fall, even-numbered years)

2335 U.S. Latino/a Spirituality
This course explores the various Expressions of belief and spirituality among U.S. Latino/a communities. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective. (Fall, Spring)

2345 World Religions
This course examines the beliefs, history, culture, sacred texts and religious views of various world religions. Emphasis is also made in regard to inter-religious dialogue, church documents of ecumenism and religious experiences in various houses of worship. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective.

2350 Gospels and Acts
This course surveys the history, literature, and faith of early Christianity found in the Gospels and the Book of Acts, with an emphasis on interpretation and methodological approaches (e.g., historical criticism, literary criticism, and cultural studies). (Fall, Spring)

3300 The Religious Quest
This course explores the human response to mystery, faith, and revelation; origin and evolution of myth, religion and its ritual expression; and relationship of religion to theology. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective.

3305 Catholic Social Teachings
A study of issues and practices of the Catholic Church dealing with social justice beginning in the 1890’s and continuing through post Vatican II documents to the present day. (May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective. Spring)

3310 Pauline Writings
This course surveys the social world, literature, and theology of early Christianity found in the Pauline writings (both the “authentic” Pauline and other apostolic letters), with emphasis on interpretation and methodological approaches (rhetorical criticism, social history, and cultural studies). Prerequisite: RELS 1340, 1345, 1355, 1360, 2330, and 2350, or permission of the Instructor. (Spring)

3320 Christian Symbols and Celebrations
This course is a study of the major rituals and symbols in the celebrations and worship in the Christian Church. Special emphasis is on the sacraments. Prerequisite: 3 hours of RELS or permission of the Instructor. (Fall, even numbered years)

3322 Christianity through Art
This course examines major themes and historical and cultural movements of the Christian faith through the perspective of the arts and/or literature. Prerequisite: 3 hours of RELS or permission of the Instructor. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective. (Spring)

3325 Arts for Christian Worship
This course examines the importance of the imagination in worship, principles for using the arts, and experience in creating drama, dance, and art for worship. Prerequisite: 3 hours of RELS or permission of the Instructor. (Spring)

3335 God and Human Sexuality
This course examines Christian theological and ethical teachings concerning sexuality and interpersonal relationships. Attention is given to issues of gender, body and spirit,
sexual violence, and marriage and intimacy. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective. (Spring)

3340 Feminist Theology
This course explores the thought of various feminist, womanist, and mujerista/latina theologians and the contributions they have made to the field of Christian theology more generally. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective. Prerequisite: RELS 1310 or permission of the Instructor. (Fall, odd-numbered years)

3350 Environmental Theology and Ethics
This course explores both various perspectives on nature found within the Christian theological and ethical tradition, and major ethical implications of global environmental policies, including issues of world hunger and food supplies; inequities in land and resource distribution; racial, ethnic and gendered aspects of environmental policies; conservation efforts; and materialism and consumerism. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective. Prerequisite: RELS 1310 or 1360 or permission of the Instructor. (Spring, even-numbered years)

3365 Christian Worship
This course studies the significance of ritual, nature of liturgy, and the history and structure of worship. Prerequisite: 3 hours of RELS or permission of the Instructor. (Every third spring)

3399 Contemporary Issues
This course provides a study of selected topics of special contemporary theological interest or importance. Course can be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 6 hours in RELS or permission of Instructor. (Every third spring)

4049 Field Education
This practicum explores praxis-oriented theory and methods of teaching, evaluation, research, and creative expression in the setting of general or religious education. Prerequisite: 30 hours of RELS; supervised by UIW RELS faculty. (Fall or Spring)

4300 Women and Faith
This course examines issues of contemporary women in relation to social justice within the context of Christian faith. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective. Prerequisite: 3 semester hours of RELS. (Every third Fall)

4310 Women in Christian Tradition
This course studies selected women from biblical to contemporary times whose activities or writings have contributed to Christianity. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective. Prerequisite: 3 semester hours of RELS or permission of Instructor. (Fall, even-numbered years)
4320 U.S. Latino/a Theology and Culture
This course is an introduction to U. S. Latino/a theology, its methodology, and current expressions. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective. Prerequisite: RELS 1310 or permission of Instructor. (Spring, even-numbered years)

4330 Death and Belief
This course is an examination of the dying and grieving processes in North America, and an exploration of the relationship of religious beliefs and the coping devices used in dealing with these processes. Prerequisite: 3 semester hours of RELS or permission of Instructor. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective. (Every third Spring)

4345 Theologies of Liberation
This course provides an overview of emerging theologies of liberation from several perspectives, such as Latin American, Feminist, Afro-American, U.S. Latino/a, and Asian. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective. Prerequisite: 6 semester hours of RELS or permission of the Instructor. (Every third Spring)

4362 Lay Leadership of Public Prayer
This course explores the theological foundations for the language and design of prayer; skills of oral communication and introduction to homiletics; and presiding at communion and other services. Prerequisite: 6 semester hours of RELS or permission of the instructor. (Every third Spring)

SOCIOLOGY (SOCI)
[Program Description, page 120]

1311 Introduction to Sociology
This course studies the structure and function of social groups and of basic sociological concepts.

2335 Social Issues Through Cinema
This course examines major social issues through the use of important U.S. and international films. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective.

2341 Social Institutions
This course examines basic social institutions, with special emphasis on the familial, political, religious, educational, and economic institutions.

3301 Collective Behavior and Social Movements
This course studies the forms and causes of collective behavior, with a special emphasis on modern social movements.

3321 Social Problems
In this course, a wide variety of current social problems are studied in depth, including the problems, history, extent, causes, effects, and possible solutions. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective.

3322 Crime and Delinquency
This course examines the nature, extent, causes, and treatment of crime and delinquency, criminological theory, agencies of control, and programs of crime prevention. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective.

3323 Criminal Justice
This course studies the criminal justice system in the United States and its antecedents. It includes an evaluation of the system’s effectiveness.

3324 Sociology of Deviance and Mental Illness
This course examines the forms and causes of social deviance, with a special emphasis on the sociological interpretation of mental illness.

3332 Culturology and Cross-Cultural Communication
This course examines the importance of culture and its role in communication. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective. Cross-referenced with ANTH 3332.

3343 Sociology of the Family
This course investigates the history, functions, and present status of the family, and examines and analyzes of some of the important family problems.

3344 Social Stratification
This course studies the class, estate, and caste systems, and the economic, ethnic, power, and prestige dimensions of stratification. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective.

3345 Sociology of Religion
This course examines religion as a social institution, and studies modes of worship, administration, interaction, and classification of religious groups such as cults, sects, denominations, and ecclesia.

3350 Sociology of Sport
The role of sport in American society: social values, racism, sexism, violence, and other social issues are examined in relation to sports. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective.

3351 Social Psychology
This course studies individual behavior and attitudes as influenced by other individuals and groups, and considers conformity, mass media, attitude formation and change, attraction, aggression, prejudice, and behavior in groups. Introductory group process. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective. Prerequisite: PSYC 1301 or SOCI 1311.

3355 Aging in America
This course is an investigation into the growing body of knowledge on the process of aging, and the realities of aging in contemporary society.

3356 Death in America
This course examines the dying-grief - bereavement process in American culture, and the role of various institutions in the interpretation and acceptance of these phenomena. Cross referenced with RELS 4330.

3361 Urban Sociology
This course studies the growth of urbanism and urbanization: institutions, planning, and change, including the impact of the urban living on social behavior.

3371 Minority Relations
This course studies racial and ethnic groups in the United States, including their sociological significance in national culture. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective.

3372 Hispanics in America
This course focuses on socio-cultural characteristics of various major Hispanic groups living in the United States. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective.

3381 Statistics for Behavioral Sciences
This course examines the statistics most commonly used in the study of sociology and social problems, with special emphasis upon frequency distributions, measures of central tendency, variability, correlation and tests of significance, chisquare, and non-parametric tests. Cross referenced with PSYC 3381.

3384 Research Methods
This course provides the opportunity for students to use experimental design in field situations, including actual field experience, non-parametric social sciences and allied areas. Prerequisite: PSYC 1301 or SOCI 1311. SOCI 3381 strongly recommended. Cross-referenced with PSYC 3384.

3387 Sociological Theory
This course studies social theorists of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries and their contributions to the field of sociology. Special emphasis is placed on Marx, Weber, and Durkheim. (Writing intensive).

4359, 4360 Directed Practicum/Internship I, II
This course provides an educationally directed program under supervision of faculty and field professionals to acquire further skills and test theories and skills acquired in the classroom. Required 180 field hours. Course does not fulfill requirements for Sociology minors.

4392 Directed Readings in Sociology
This course studies major writings in the principal areas of sociology since World War I.

SPANISH (SPAN)
[Program Description, page 123]

1311/1312 Elementary Spanish
This course introduces students to fundamentals of Spanish, with emphasis on developing listening comprehension and speaking skills. It includes activities for developing abilities in speaking, listening, reading, and writing. 3 class hours. Individual laboratory. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

1313 Beginning Spanish for Health Care Professionals
This course offers further development of Spanish communication skills acquired in previous study or experience, with focus on vocabulary needed in the health care field, and on cultural appropriateness of interactions with Hispanic patients. Prerequisite: At least one course in beginning Spanish (1311 or 1312) or consent of instructor. May also be counted for credit by students who have taken both 1311 and 1312 or who have earned 6 hours of CLEP credit. (As required)

2311 Intermediate Spanish: Oral Communication
This course provides extensive practice in oral communication, with emphasis on the development of oral proficiency and skills such as discussion, reading aloud, story telling, informative presentations, and persuasive speaking. It includes a review of grammar and usage in the context of the spoken word. Prerequisites: SPAN 1311-1312 or equivalent. (Fall)

2312 Intermediate Spanish II: Writing
This course involves practice of written Spanish appropriate for limited publication, such as newsletters and collections of recipes, essays, and other academic or creative writing. It presents grammar and usage, as well as spelling, punctuation, and use of the orthographic accent, in the context of writing for a wider audience. Prerequisites: SPAN 2311 or the equivalent proficiency, as determined by the instructor. (Spring)

3301 Advanced Spanish Grammar and Composition
This course covers an extensive review of complex grammatical structures with vocabulary building. Students will do a selected grammar review to strengthen skills in Spanish language composition. The basic writing skills of spelling, punctuation, and accentuation will also be reviewed. Differences between the written and spoken language will be pointed out toward the production of compositions using the written standard. Prerequisites: SPAN 3211 and 2312, or permission of the instructor. (As required)

3311/3312 Culture and Civilization of Spain; Culture and Civilization of Latin America
This course is a study of the customs, ideas, and attitudes of the Spanish-speaking peoples. It explores the development of regional differences in popular culture, as well as the changes in the material and intellectual culture of ruling groups. Prerequisites: SPAN 3211, SPAN 2312, or permission of the instructor. (3311 Fall, odd-numbered years; 3312 Fall, even-numbered years)

3319/3619 Internship in Spanish
This course provides a practical experience as a language professional in an international or bilingual environment, with opportunities to develop skills in speaking, reading, and translating Spanish. Prerequisites: 6 hours of Intermediate Spanish or the equivalent, and permission of instructor. Requires 140- 160 hours of work for 3 hours credit, 280-320 hours of work for 6 hours credit. SPAN 3319 may be repeated once for credit. (As needed)

3321 Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics
This course studies the sound system, grammar, and semantics of Spanish using methods of analysis developed in modern linguistics. Attention will be given also to social variation of language, language acquisition, and the historical development of dialect differences. Prerequisites: SPAN 3211, SPAN 2312, or permission of the instructor. (Spring, even-numbered years)

3322 Spanish Phonetics and Oral Communication
This course is an analysis of the sound system of Spanish, with intensive practice in oral communication with emphasis on pronunciation and voice quality suitable for culturally appropriate communication in a variety of situations. Prerequisites: SPAN 3211, SPAN 2312, or permission of the instructor (Spring, odd numbered years)

3331 Spanish Literature to 1700
This course examines readings from major Spanish authors from the Middle Ages to 1700. Practice in critical analysis through discussion, reports, compositions, and examinations. Prerequisites: SPAN 3211, SPAN 2312, or permission of the instructor (Spring, even-numbered years)

3332 Spanish Literature since 1700
This course examines readings from major Spanish authors from 1700 to the present, involving practice in critical analysis through discussion, reports, compositions, and examinations. Prerequisites: SPAN 3211, SPAN 2312, or permission of the instructor (Spring, odd numbered years)

3333 Spanish for Professional Fields
This course provides refinement of language skills and study of cultural patterns and behavior observed in the professional world. Attention will be given to pronunciation, vocabulary, syntax, and style levels appropriate to professional areas. Prerequisites: SPAN 2311, 2312, or permission of instructor. (Spring)

3334 Spanish in the Media
In this course, students will view video and film, read newspaper and magazine articles from Spanish and Latin American sources, analyze the linguistic and stylistic requirements of the different media, and practice in writing articles and scripts. Student productions will be videotaped for evaluation. Prerequisites: SPAN 2311-2312, or 2313, or permission of instructor. (as required)

3335 Children’s Literature in Spanish
This course is a survey of children’s and adolescent literature written in Spanish by authors from the U.S., Latin America, and Spain. It presents approaches to literature appropriate for young readers, with research into the reading process in second language and bilingual settings. Prerequisites: SPAN 3211, SPAN 2312, or permission of the instructor (Spring, odd-numbered years)

3337 Applied Linguistics for Teaching
This course examines recent theory of language acquisition and teaching, current language teaching practice, new national and state standards, and other professional issues for language teachers. It also provides an analysis of the problem areas of Spanish for students, both experienced and inexperienced speakers, and involves practical application of theory to classroom activities, for teachers K-12. (Prerequisites: Advanced standing in Spanish. Recommended: Spanish 3321, Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics. (Fall, even-numbered years)

3341 Spanish-American Literature to Modernism
In this course, students will read Spanish- American authors from Pre-Columbian times to Modernism, and thoroughly analyze them through discussion, reports, compositions, and examinations. Prerequisites: SPAN 3211, SPAN 2312, or permission of the instructor (Fall, even-numbered years)

3342 Spanish-American Literature since Modernism
In this course, students will read Spanish- American authors from Modernism to the present, and critically analyze them through discussion, reports, compositions, and examinations. A topic chosen each semester will provide a central theme for study of the texts: the dictatorship, women and men in literature and society, a child’s view of the world, or other theme. Prerequisites: SPAN 3211, SPAN 2312, or permission of the instructor (Fall, odd-numbered years)

3343 The Literature of U.S. Hispanics
In this course, students will read and analyze American-born authors of Hispanic descent, especially from the Mexican- American, Puerto Rican and Cuban- American traditions. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective. Prerequisites: SPAN 3211, SPAN 2312, or permission of the instructor (Spring, even numbered years)

4311 Topics in Hispanic Linguistics
This course is an advanced study in Hispanic linguistics. It may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. (as required)

4312 Topics in Spanish or Spanish-American Culture and Civilization
This course is an advanced study in Spanish or Spanish-American culture and civilization. It may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. (As required)

4313 Topics in Spanish or Spanish-American Literature
This course is an advanced study in Spanish or Spanish-American literature, focusing on a period, genre, or author. It may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. (As required)

5398 Independent Study in Spanish
This course provides an opportunity for students to engage in independent research and writing under the supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisite: Senior standing and approval in writing of the student’s proposal by the instructor. (As needed)

SPEECH (SPCH)
[Program Description, page 124]

1311 Public Speaking
This course introduces students to the preparation, delivery, and evaluation of informative and persuasive speeches. It satisfies the CORE requirement. (Spring, Fall)

2321 Voice and Diction
This course promotes the improvement of the speaking voice. Emphasis is placed on voice production, enunciation, and speech dynamics. (Fall)

2331 Oral Interpretation of Literature
This course is an analysis of literary forms with selected readings from poetry, prose, and dramatic literature. (Spring)

2341 Business and Professional Communication
This course examines the role of Communication in professional, organizational, and industrial settings. It covers informative reports and sales presentations, interviews, small-group discussion, meetings, nonverbal communication in the workplace, and negotiation processes. (Fall, Spring)

3321 Oral Interpretation of Literature
This course is an analysis of literary forms with selected readings from poetry, prose, and dramatic literature. (Spring)

3371 Persuasion
This course is a study of persuasive Principles and practices involving the delivery of propositions of fact, value, and policy. Prerequisite: SPCH 1311. (Spring)

3391 Nonverbal Communication
This course surveys the theory and Application of social and physical environment, body image, attire and artifacts, gesture and posture, face, eyes, voice, time, and the senses. (Spring)

4371 Interpersonal Communication
This course explores the self and human relationships. Includes intrapersonal communication, perception, language, emotions, listening, nonverbal communication, and interaction processes. (Fall, Spring)

4391 Great Speakers of the 20th Century
This course is an intensive analysis of Significant public speeches and speakers from past and present. Emphasis is placed on rhetorical skills rather than performance. Prerequisite: SPCH 1311. (As required)

4395 Practicum in Speech
This course provides students with the opportunity to analyze the various modes of communication in an intensive study. (Every semester)

SPORT MANAGEMENT (SMHP)
[Program Description, page 135]

3301 Introduction to Sport Management
Survey and introduction to the field of Sport Management. Topics include types and structures of sports organizations, local to global, quality management, leadership, governance, strategic planning, performance review, information systems, and introduction to sports research (Fall 2001 and Spring 2003).

3302 Human Factors in Sports Management
Overview of individual and organizational dynamics that effect human behavior and performance. Includes value of the individual, self-awareness, motivation, interpersonal skills, teamwork, decisions, ethics and values, organizational communication and culture, and activities (Spring 2002 and Fall 2003).

3303 Seminar in Sports Organizations and Public Market
Organization and promotion of special events. Topics include communication and mass media, marketing and advertising, finance, economics of sports and community impact. Requires service learning component and on-site orientation and activities (Fall 2002 and Spring 2004).

3306 Sports Law
The issues of law relevant to all aspects of sports including quasi-governmental agencies, antitrust and discrimination issues (Spring odd years).

3319 Internship in Sports Management
Requires 120 hours of work in a major sports organization and a project. Prerequisites: 9 hours in Sports Management and permission of instructor (Every semester)

THEATRE ARTS (THAR)
[Program Description, page 125]

1191 Theatre Practicum
This course provides students with laboratory experience in acting, stage management, and the design, construction, and handling of scenery, lighting, sound, properties, costumes, and publicity. Fee. (Fall, Spring)

1320 Acting in Everyday Life
This course introduces the art of acting in order to develop an appreciation of the art and an understanding of how various acting techniques may be used to heighten one’s awareness and as a tool for self realization. Fee. Satisfies CORE Arts requirement. (Fall, Spring)

1321 Beginning Acting
This course introduces the art of acting for the student wishing to major in Theatre Arts. The course focuses on the basic principles and techniques of realistic acting, based upon the methods of Constantine Stanislavsky. Fee. Satisfies CORE Arts requirement for Theatre Majors. (Fall)

1322 Intermediate Acting
This course is a continuation of the Study of the art and technique of acting, with the major focus on the process of characterization and scene study. Fee. Prerequisite: THAR 1321. (Spring)

1380 Introduction to Theatre
This course is an introduction to the process of theatrical production, as well as the academic study of theatre, its history, art, and craft. It is designed for the THAR major. Fee. Satisfies Core Arts requirement. (Fall)

1381 Theatre Appreciation
This course is a survey of the process of taking a play from the page to the stage. The focus includes the study of representative theatrical periods, plays, And production techniques. It is designed for the non-theatre major. Satisfies Core Arts requirement. (Fall, various)

2192/2193 Theatre Practicum
This course provides students with a laboratory experience in acting, stage management, and the design, construction, and handling of scenery, lighting, sound, properties, costumes, and publicity. Fee. (Fall, Spring)

2242 Basic Stage Make-up
This course studies the principles of the art, technique, and design of stage makeup. Fee. (Various)

2324 Stage Movement
This course is a study of physical coordination, timing, force, quality, and motivation leading to an understanding of the actor’s physical impulse. Fee. (Various)

2325 Theatre Voice and Speech Studies
This course introduces students to the fundamentals of correct voice production and clear speech as it applies to acting for the stage, presentation of portfolio, and audition. (Spring, odd-numbered years)

2350 Survey of Musical Theater in the U.S.
Survey of Musical Theater in the U.S. Will expose the student to the most Popular of the many forms of music on the stage. These works will include revues, operettas, operas, and Broadway musicals. In this course the student will develop the ability to differentiate among the many styles, time periods, and form a time line for the individual style formation and maturation of each particular genre. Visual and aural learning will take place.

2360 Introduction to Technical Production
This course studies the basic terminology and procedures of scenery and costume construction, lighting, properties and backstage organization. It includes a laboratory experience in these production aspects. Fee. (Fall)

2361 Introduction to Theatre Design
This course introduces students to the application of scenic, costume, and lighting principles and formats. Skills include drawing, painting, and model making techniques for the expression of theatrical design. Fee. Satisfies Core Arts Requirement. (Spring)

2380 Play Analysis
This course examines text analysis for the actor, director, and designer, using an overview of texts from the Greeks to contemporary dramatic literature, including study of the text in its original time period for contemporary production. (Spring, various)

3194/3195 Advanced Theatre Practicum
This course provides students with an advanced laboratory experience in acting, directing, stage management; and the design, construction, and handling of scenery, lighting, sound, properties, and costumes. Fee. (Fall, Spring)

3304 Children’s Theatre
This course examines the theory and practice of play production for the child audience, with laboratory application. Prerequisite: THAR 1322, or permission of the instructor. (Summer, as needed)

3323 Acting in Verse
This course presents special problems in acting related to verse texts, e.g. Greek, Shakespeare, and Moliere. Fee. Prerequisite: THAR 1322 or permission of the instructor. May be repeated for credit. (Fall, even-numbered years)

3324 Selected Topics in Performance
This course is a continuation of the study of the art and technique of acting, with the major focus on the various genres and styles, i.e. Realism, Restoration, Greek or Postmodern. The course expands on the student’s knowledge of concentration, observation, setting objectives, planning tactics, and overcoming obstacles. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: THAR 1322 or permission of the instructor. (Spring, odd-numbered years. May be repeated for credit.)

3326 Advanced Acting
This course is designed for Theatre Arts majors as a continuation of the study of the art and technique of acting, with a major focus on advanced scene study. Prerequisites: THAR 1322, and completion of 65 semester credit hours or permission of the instructor. Fee. (various)

3341 Costume Design
This course is a study and application of the costume design process from research methods to painted sketches. Instructor’s permission required. Fee. (Spring, even numbered years)

3344 Costume Construction
This course is a study and application of sewing techniques, flat patterning, and draping skills for the stage. Fee. (Fall)

3362 Scene Design
This course examines the coordination of the visual scenic elements that comprise a theatrical production, and an introduction to theatre graphics. It includes laboratory experiences in Scenic Design. Prerequisite: THAR 1380 and 2361 or permission of the instructor. Fee. Cross list with ARTS 3312 (Fall, odd-numbered years)

3363 Light Design
This course explores how form is revealed by light. The student will learn how the controllable aspects of light can change our perception of form, as well as affect mood and sense on time and place. Research in this course will be directed toward this end, and will involve attending theatrical productions, studying the works of artists and photographers, and watching the sky. Fee. (Spring, even- numbered years)

3381 The Development of Drama and Theatre I
This course is a study of the development of Western theatre from ancient times through the 18th century. It includes the reading of representative plays. This is the writing intensive course for the major. (Fall)

3382 The Development of Drama and Theatre II
This course studies the development of western theatre since 1800 and includes the reading of representative plays. (Spring)

4196 Advanced Theatre Practicum
This course provides students with a laboratory experience in stage management, directing, and the design, construction, and handling of scenery, lighting, sound, properties, costumes, publicity, and box office. Fee. (Fall, Spring)

4301 Creativity in the Arts
This course presents an overview of the theoretical and practical aspects of creativity applied to the integration of the arts (i.e. music, dance, visual art, theatre, and literature) in the elementary school classroom in order to develop children’s imagination and expressive capacity. (Spring)

4303 Creative Dramatics
This course is an exploration of process oriented, non-exhibitional theatre activities theatre games with emphasis on movement, pantomime, improvisation, and story dramatization to enhance the creative development of the individual. Fee. (Summer, as needed)

4331 Fundamentals of Directing
This course is an introduction to the role of the Director in the production of plays for the stage, structural and critical thinking, casting, and rehearsing a play, and includes preparation of scenes for laboratory presentation. Prerequisites: THAR 1322 and 2361 or permission of the instructor (Spring, odd numbered years)

4342 Costume History
This course is a chronological study of western dress and its relationship to society and culture from ancient Egyptian to contemporary times. It includes a study of movement for the actor in period dress. (Fall, even numbered years)

4370 Internship in Theatre Arts
(Various)

4383 Dramatic Theory and Criticism
What is Theory and why is it important? How is theory useful to theatre and performance scholars? This course will study major trends in dramatic theory and criticism from the Greeks to contemporary critical theory across the disciplines. The course will provide a foundation in general areas of theory. (Spring, various)

4385 Shakespeare
May be cross-listed with ENGL 4340. Major authors when Shakespear is the author.

4387 American Theatre
American Theatre is a survey of indigenous theatre and its place in the development of our diverse national heritage. (Spring, various)

4393 Reading and Research in Theatre Arts
This course involves intensive research and writing in a selected area conducted under the supervision of the faculty. Departmental approval required. (Fall, various)

4533 Senior Studio
Students will synthesize their knowledge of all areas of theatre and its collaborative nature to select or create a play/project, which will be rehearsed, designed, and dramaturged by the class participants and presented in the late spring departmental production schedule. Prerequisite: THAR 4331. Fee. (Spring)

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