Rehabilitative Science

Courses

NOTE: Course descriptions and offerings are controlled by the individual disciplines.

The Bachelor of Science with a major in Rehabilitative Sciences is designed to be the pathway for students seeking to go into physical therapy, occupational therapy, orthotics/prosthetics, chiropractic, and physician assistant studies. Furthermore, the curriculum structure and content give the graduate a strong foundation to embark on other careers in advanced health care settings or to enter the workforce as entry-level technician in health care settings. The following is a list of major and support courses needed to complete the major. The major and support disciplines include:

ATHLETIC TRAINING COURSES

ATHP 1211 Medical Terminology for Healthcare Professionals

This course focuses on the development of knowledge and understanding of basic medical terminology. Prefixes, suffixes, word roots, combining forms, special endings, plural forms, abbreviations, and symbols are included in the content. This course will also develop medical terminology according to particular areas of the body.  Pre-requisite: None.

ATHP 1310 Introduction to Patient Care

This introductory course focuses on the foundational development of knowledge, understanding, and clinical skills for safe practice in healthcare settings. Emphasis is placed on patient interaction, critical thinking, and practical skills in athletic training, rehabilitative, and healthcare settings. The course requires the student to complete external observation hours and laboratory activities.  Pre-requisite: Admitted to major, Signature required.

ATHP 2305 Functional Anatomy and Muscle Testing

This course includes an in-depth advanced review of anatomical and physiological processes needed by the professional to understand underlying tissues and movements from the standpoint of physical injury, assessment, and rehabilitation.  This course offers a detailed review of each body segment related to athletes and the physically active; skeletal framework, articulation, musculature, innervation, and how each affects body position and movement during activity.  Pre-requisites:  BIOL 2321 and BIOL 2121.

ATHP 2310 Orthopedic Injuries and Athletic Conditions

This course includes an in-depth look at orthopedic injuries and athletic conditions throughout the lifespan as they relate to the different systems of the body.  Areas to be covered in the class include discussion of mechanism(s), common clinical signs and symptoms for injuries and conditions, the use of evidence based care plans, and the creation of differential diagnosis.  Pre-requisites:  BIOL 2321 and BIOL 2121.

ATHP 2315 Evaluation Strategies for the Trunk and Lower Extremity

This course is an in-depth study and practice of techniques used in the assessment and analysis of injuries and conditions of the trunk and lower extremity.  By recognizing the signs and symptoms and then performing and interpreting results of special tests, the student will develop methods with which to accurately evaluate and determine the extent of the injury sustained, and determine a clinical diagnosis.  Pre-requisites:  ATHP 2305 and ATHP 2310. 

ATHP 2320 Evaluation Strategies for the Head, Neck, and Upper Extremity

This course is an in-depth study and practice of techniques used in the assessment and analysis of injuries and conditions of the head, neck, and upper extremity.  By recognizing the signs and symptoms and then performing and interpreting results of special tests, the student will develop methods with which to accurately evaluate and determine the extent of the injury sustained, and determine a clinical diagnosis.  Pre-requisite:  ATHP 2315.

ATHP 3310 Pathology of Body Systems

This course covers the pathophysiology of prominent acute and chronic diseases of the major body systems.  Students will study the interdependency of body systems and the conditions that affect human health and well-being.  Other topics include common risk factors associated with these conditions, as well as their response to, and impact on, physical activity.  Pre-requisites:  BIOL 2321, BIOL 2121, BIOL 2322 and BIOL 2122.

ATHP 3320 Therapeutic Modalities

This course focuses on the theory, principles, and physiological effects of various therapeutic modalities used in the treatment of orthopedic injuries and athletic conditions.   The course will address evidence based physical, mechanical and electrical agents used in clinical practice along with non-traditional interventions.  Pre-requisites:  ATHP 1310 and ATHP 2310. 

ATHP 3330 Therapeutic Rehabilitation

This course focuses on the theory, principles, and physiological effects of therapeutic rehabilitation used in the treatment of orthopedic injuries and athletic conditions.   The course will address the use of evidence based clinical practice, the design and progression of interventions, assessment of interventions, and determination for return to participation and/or referral, along with non-traditional interventions.  Pre-requisite:  ATHP 3320 and PEHP 3355.

ATHP 4380 Honors Research Project

This course is a capstone research course designed for students involved in the university honors program.  Students will explore the research process with a faculty mentor including design, review by the institutional review board, review of the pertinent literature, design of a research proposal, statistical analysis, and the preparation of either a manuscript or presentation.  Pre-requisites:  MATH 2303 or PSYC/SOCI/CRJU 3381, PSYC/SOCI/CRJU 3384, Signature required. 

ATHP 4388 Professional Internship

This course allows the student to experience various professional administrative tasks and skills that an individual will face in their profession. The student will meet with professionals in their chosen area and gain experiences that allow them to uncover and understand topics related to the profession.  Pre-requisite: Signature required.

BIOLOGY COURSES

BIOL 1401 Diversity of Life
This course studies the diversity of living organisms, structure and function of plants and animals, ecology, and evolution.  It provides a foundation for advanced courses in biology, but also serves as the sciences core requirement. 

BIOL 1402 Unity of Life
This course studies the characteristics of living organisms, cell theory, metabolism, and genetics. A foundation for advanced courses in biology and is required of biology majors. Pre-requisites: CHEM 1301.

BIOL 1403 Evolution, Ecology, and Biodiversity

This course examines the diversity of living organisms, structure and function of plants and animals, principles of evolution, and ecology for science majors. It is a foundation for advanced courses in biology. Students must enroll in both the lecture and a laboratory section. 

BIOL 2121 Anatomy and Physiology I Lab
Serves to clarify material from the corresponding lectures. Co-requisite: BIOL 2321.

BIOL 2122 Anatomy and Physiology II Lab
Serves to clarify material from the corresponding lectures. Co-requisite: BIOL 2322.

BIOL 2321 Anatomy and Physiology I
This course examines the gross structure and functions of of the human organism. It is designed for students in the paramedical fields, biology, and physical education. Pre-requisites: None. Co-requisite: BIOL 2121.

BIOL 2322 Anatomy and Physiology II

This course covering the second half of a two-semester sequence on the structure and function of the human organism. The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with the endocrine system, circulation, immunity, respiration, digestion, urinary system, homeostasis of acid, base, and fluids, reproduction, and development. Pre-requisites: BIOL 2321. Co-requisite: BIOL 2122.

BIOL 3471 General Microbiology
This course is designed for biology and nutrition majors.  The principles of morphology, taxonomy, metabolism, and molecular biology of microbial cells and viruses will be presented.  Prerequisites: BIOL 1402 and CHEM 1302. 

CHEMISTRY COURSES

CHEM 1301 Chemical Principles I

This course studies fundamental laws and theories of chemistry: the modern concept of the atom, atomic structure and periodic properties of the elements, kinetic-molecular theory, states of matter, solutions, acids, bases, and salts, oxidation-reduction, equilibrium, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, bonding. Must be taken in sequence. Prerequisite MATH 1304.

CHEM 1302 Chemical Principles II

This course studies fundamental laws and theories of chemistry: the modern concept of the atom, atomic structure and periodic properties of the elements, kinetic-molecular theory, states of matter, solutions, acids, bases, and salts, oxidation-reduction, equilibrium, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, bonding. Must be taken in sequence. Prerequisite: CHEM 1301. Co-requisite: CHEM 1203L.

CHEM 1203L General Chemistry Laboratory

This course offers laboratory experiments chosen to illustrate concepts taught in the lecture.  Prerequisite: CHEM 1301. Co-requisite: CHEM 1302. 

CHEM 2111 Organic Chemistry Laboratory I

The first in a two-semester sequence, this laboratory provides students with training in basic organic chemistry laboratory skills such as melting point determination, recrystallization, extraction, distillation, thin-layer and gas chromatography, and their applications to chemical reactions. Students will also practice and refine their scientific writing skills. Prerequisite: CHEM 1203L. Co-requisite: CHEM 2311.

CHEM 2112 Organic Chemistry Laboratory II

In the second semester of this laboratory sequence, students carry out a variety of organic chemistry reactions that complement and supplement the material covered in the second semester lecture course. Students will also learn basic spectroscopic techniques used to analyze reaction products and other organic chemicals, including infra-red, nuclear magnetic resonance, and UV-vis spectroscopies. Prerequisite: CHEM 2111. Co-requisite: CHEM 2312.

CHEM 2311 Organic Chemistry I

An introduction to structure, nomenclature, conformations, reactions, and mechanism is provided in this course. Core concepts in chemical bonding, acid-base reactions, resonance and inductive effects, functional group transformations, and stereochemistry are covered. Prerequisite: CHEM 1302. Co-requisite: CHEM 2111.

CHEM 2312 Organic Chemistry II

Organic Chemistry II builds upon the foundations established in Organic Chemistry I. A wide variety of functional group transforming reactions are covered, especially in the context of synthesis. Each class of reactions and the functional groups they involve are supported with nomenclature and relevant properties. An introduction to spectroscopy and spectrometry, including infra-red and nuclear magnetic resonance spectrosopies and mass spectrometry, is also included. Prerequisite: CHEM 2311. Co-requisite: CHEM 2112.

KINESIOLOGY COURSES

PEHP 3350 Theory of Movement Forms: Analysis and Construction
The interrelationship of kinematics and kinetics of motion. Physiological and psychological development of the child in relation to learning neuromuscular activities.

PEHP 4338 Fundamentals of Human Performance
The theoretical study and practical application of exercise through an understanding of the metabolic and energetic process. To include topics which impact performance such as body composition, nutrition, training, environment, aging, disease, and substance abuse.

PHYSICS COURSES

PHYS 1301/1102 General Physics I with Lab

This course is a study of mechanics, gravitation, fluids, heat, and thermal properties of matter. Prerequisite: MATH 1311. 

PHYS 1302/1102 General Physics II with Lab

This course is a study of waves and wave properties, sound, fundamentals of electricity and magnetism, properties of light, optics. Prerequisite: PHYS 1301 and PHYS 1101.

PSYCHOLOGY AND SOCIOLOGY COURSES

PSYC 1301 Introduction to Psychology

This course studies the basic facts and principles of psychology.

PSYC 3331 Abnormal Psychology

This course examines the psychology of normality and variations, including character disorders, substance abuse, sexual deviations, neuroses, psychoses, techniques, and theories. Prerequisite: PSYC 1301 and 3 semester hours of PSYC.

PSYC 3351 or SOCI 3351 Social Psychology

This course studies individual behavior and attitudes as influenced by other individual and groups, and considers conformity, mass media, attitude formation and change, attraction, aggression, prejudice, and behavior in groups. Cross-referenced with SOC 3351. Prerequisite: PSYC 1301 or SOC 1311.

PSYC 3353 Personality

This course studies the theories of personality, with current research and applications to adult life. It explores therapeutic techniques of theorists, and examines growth and mental health of adult personality changes. Prerequisite: PSYC 1301.

PSYC 3381, SOCI 3381 or CRJU 3381 Statistics for Behavioral Sciences

This course examines common behavioral science statistical techniques such as frequency distributions, measures of central tendency, variability, correlation and tests of significance, chi-square, and non-parametic tests. Cross- referenced with SOCI 3381. Prerequisites: MATH 1304 or permission of instructor. 

PSYC 3384, SOCI 3384 or CRJU 3384 Research Methods

This course introduces basic research issues relevant to the behavioral and social sciences. A variety of research methodologies will be discussed, including descriptive, correlational, and experimental methods. Critical thinking skills, the ethical context of research, and APA style will be emphasized. 

PSYC 4320 Health Psychology

This course provides a scientific study of the ways in which psychological principles can be used to prevent and treat illness and promote health. This course examines how behaviors relate to health enhancement, disease prevention, safety, and rehabilitation. Prerequisites: PSYC 1301 and 6 semester hours of Psychology OR permission of the instructor.


 


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