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Third Year Optometry Curriculum

3rd Professional Year; 57 credit hours

 
 

SUMMER SEMESTER

Course   #

Course Title

Credit Hrs.

OPT309

Clinical Case Analysis

1.5

OPT303

Posterior Segment Pathology II

3.0

OPT301

Patient Care & Physical Diagnosis

1.5

OPT329

Research Methodology

1.0

OPT302

Advanced Contact Lens

3.5

OPT307

Vision Therapy

3.0

OPT306

Glaucoma Diagnosis & Management

2.5

OPT304

Clinical Internship III

6.0

OPTElec

Spanish for Optometrists

n/a

 

Total Credits

22.0

 

FALL SEMESTER

Course   #

Course Title

Credit Hrs.

OPT216

Advanced Vision Science with Clinical Application

1.0

OPT318

Optometric Practice Development

2.0

OPT317

Strabismus & Amblyopia Diagnosis & Management

2.5

OPT325

Public Health, Epidemiology, and Geriatrics

2.0

OPT313

Neuro-Ophthalm. Disorders.

3.0

OPT319

Legal & Ethical Aspects of Optometry

2.0

OPT314

Clinical Internship IV

6.0

OPT315

Genomic Medicine

1.0

 

Total Credits

19.5

 

SPRING SEMESTER

Course   #

Course Title

Credit Hrs.

OPT326

Clinical Medicine & Systemic Disease

2.0

OPT321

Peri-operative Management & Techniques

2.5

OPT328

Optometric Business & Administration

2.0

OPT312

Low Vision Rehabilitation

3.0

OPT323

Advanced Topics Seminars

1.0

OPT324

Clinical Internship V

6.0

 

Total Credits

16.5

 

OPT 216         Advanced Vision Science with Clinical Application (1 Credit)
Prerequisites – OPT 114

One hour of lecture per week.  Advanced vision science and how it is applied to enhance the accuracy and efficacy of detection, diagnosis and management of normal and abnormal visual function.  Emphasis is placed on clinical assessment and case analysis.  Discrimination between optical, functional and organic bases for visual dysfunction.   Electrodiagnosis of the visual system including layer-by-layer analysis of retinal and visual pathway function.  Advanced psychophysical approaches for assessing quality-of-vision, color vision and pathway specific function.  Effects of development, aging, and disease processes on visual performance and function.  Functional imaging techniques.  Cognitive aspects of vision including illusory perception and attention.  Contemporary vision research methodology.  Utility of advanced vision science in contemporary optometry. 

 

OPT 301         Patient Care and Physical Diagnosis (1.5 Credits) 
Prerequisites - OPT 115, OPT 125, OPT 126, OPT 218, OPT227

One hour of lecture and one hour of laboratory per week.  Clinical applications of physical diagnosis to include a basic neurological evaluation and a basic cardiovascular evaluation.  Clinical laboratory indications, tests, and interpretation.  Examination of the head and neck for adenopathy, asymmetry, hair quality, psoratic lesions, and skull deformation.  Understanding of dermatomes and their relationship to physical diagnosis.  Training in the use of an otoscope for the evaluation of nasal/oral cavities, and auditory canal.  An assessment of the cranial nerves.  Basic life support (BLS) training and certification.  Basic first aid training.  Preparation for appropriate response to medical urgencies and emergencies.  Sphygmomanometry and accurate blood pressure testing.  Auscultating of the carotid artery and assessment of carotid bruit.

 

 

OPT 302         Advanced Contact Lenses (3.5 Credits)
Prerequisites – OPT 222

Two and one-half hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week.  A continuation of OPT 222.  The design and fitting of rigid and hydrogel contact lenses in cases of high and/or irregular astigmatism and/or increased corneal higher order aberrations.  Application of contact lenses for correction of presbyopia.  Design and fitting of contact lenses for patients with keratoconus, corneal ectasia and/or pellucid marginal degeneration.  Strategies for the use of contact lenses on infants and the pediatric population.  The use of advanced technology such as computerized corneal topography and wave front analysis (Marco 3-D wave, Orbscan) in contact lens fitting.  The use of corneal refractive therapy and orthokeratology in myopia treatment.  Advanced fitting of contact lenses on the post-refractive surgery and diseased cornea.  Fitting of therapeutic bandage or other therapeutic contact lenses for sustained drug release or for corneal surface disease to include superficial corneal disease/trauma to include corneal abrasion, recurrent corneal erosion, or epithelial basement membrane dystrophy.  Special considerations for the fitting of contact lenses on the geriatric population.  Billing and coding for contact lens services and bundling of services in the contact lens practice.  Use of technicians in the fitting of contact lenses.

 

 

OPT 303         Posterior Segment Pathology II (3 Credits)
Prerequisites - OPT 223

Two hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. A continuation of OPT 223 including advanced techniques and recent advances in detection, diagnosis and management of posterior segment disease

 

 

OPT 304         Clinical Internship III (6 Credits)
Prerequisites – None

Twelve hours of clinic per week.  Clinical patient care will be within the primary care/contact lens clinic, pediatric clinic, the optical service, and ocular disease clinic.  A nursing home component to the clinical experience will be provided.  Community based screening may also be assigned as part of OPT 304.  Participation with doctors of optometry or other physicians in comprehensive direct patient care within the various services areas.  Case conferences and grand round experiences will be assigned.  Case presentations, evidence-based research on cases, and ongoing enhancement/proficiency of examination skills and assignments as assigned by faculty are expected by all students.

 

 

OPT 306         Glaucoma Diagnosis and Management (2.5 Credits)
Prerequisites – OPT 215, OPT 228, OPT 223, OPT 303

Two hours of lecture per week and one hour of laboratory per week.  A comprehensive review of glaucoma.  Etiology, mechanisms, natural history, prevalence of glaucoma.  Classifications of glaucoma.  Anterior segment and posterior segment relationships to the diagnosis and management of the glaucomas.  Primary and secondary glaucomas.  Exhaustive presentation of the diagnostic tests and their interpretation.  The use of gonisocopy, pachymetry, intra-ocular pressure, anterior chamber anatomy, pre-existing ocular disease considerations, previous surgery considerations, previous trauma consideration, and co-morbidities in the diagnosis of glaucoma.  The use of advanced technology in the diagnosis and management of glaucoma to include GDx, HRT, OCT, RTA or other optic nerve head imaging.  The appropriate use of automated and non-automated visual field testing.  The use of 78D/90D slit lamp biomicroscopy in the diagnosis and management of glaucoma.  The use of photographic techniques in the diagnosis and management of glaucoma.  Treating the glaucomas with medical management.  Treating the glaucomas with surgical and/or laser treatments.  The standard of care of glaucoma diagnosis and management along the course of the disease process.  The complications of diagnosis and management of the glaucoma with ocular co-morbidities to include neurologic defects, macular degeneration, retinal detachment, or other ocular pathology.    The proper coding and billing of the glaucoma patient.  Appropriate follow-up schedules in the management of glaucoma.  Appropriate written and oral communications among medical professionals as part of the standard of care for glaucoma patients.

 

 

OPT 307         Vision Therapy (3 Credits)
Prerequisites – OPT 213, OPT 227

Two hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. Diagnosis of disorders of accommodation, binocular vision and visual perception. Remediation of binocular vision disorders and visual perceptual anomalies.  Management by means of motor and sensory therapy. Development of therapy regimens for these visual anomalies and prognoses for their resolution.  Treatment and management strategies for the integration of modern visual/visual perceptual therapy into contemporary clinical practice.

 

 

OPT 309         Clinical Case Analysis (1.5 Credits)
Prerequisites - OPT 229

One hour of lecture and one hour of laboratory per week.  Multi-disciplinary case analysis of patient data introduced in lecture and synthesized/evaluated in the laboratory group settings.  Preliminary diagnoses and management plans will be written to include follow-plans, addition test to be ordered and management plans to be implemented.  Critical thinking skills will be emphasized along with evidence-based decision making through independent and group evidence gathering supporting their management plans.  Cases will be written to incorporate and integrate optical, ocular, systemic, functional, and disease process that require an integrated approach to remediating patients’ problems along with evaluating the relative co-morbidity and mortality risks associated with findings.

 

 

OPT 312         Low Vision Rehabilitation (3 Credits)
Prerequisites - OPT 112, OPT 122, OPT 212, OPT 223, OPT 303, OPT 306

Two hours of lecture and one hour of laboratory per week.  Etiology and epidemiology of vision impairment and associated diseases.  Categories of low vision and their associated visual impairments.  The process of history taking, examination and evaluation of a low vision patient to determine a low vision remediation plan.  Modifications of optometric testing procedures for the low vision patient.  Prescription of optical and non-optical devices used in the management of the low vision patient.  The use of technology in the diagnosis and management of the low vision patient.  Multi-disciplinary integration of low vision rehabilitation.  Patient counseling and ancillary community-based services.    Orientation and mobility.  The optics of low vision devices and their application to low vision patient to include telescopes, telemicroscopes, high add and microscopic lenses, magnifiers, electronic magnification, bioptic telescopes.  The use of filters, typoscopes and lighting.  Yoked prisms and vision therapy.  Congenital and acquired brain injuries as low vision patients.  The practice management aspect of incorporating low vision rehabilitation into a contemporary practice of optometry.  Billing and coding of the low vision patient. 

 

 

OPT 313         Neurological Eye Disease (3 Credits)
Prerequisites - OPT 126

Three hours of lecture per week.  The diagnosis and management of neurological disorders that affect the eye, adnexa, and visual pathway.  Optic neuropathies, vascular disease, space-occupying lesions within the cranium and orbit.  Cranial nerve disease and its affect on sensory and motor function of the eyes and visual system.  Radiology studies in neurological eye disease to include CT, MRI, and MRA.  Surgical and medical management.  Clinical-legal aspects of neurological eye disease.

 

 

OPT 314         Clinical Internship IV (6 Credits)
Prerequisites - OPT 304

Twelve hours of clinic per week.  Clinic patient care will be within the primary care/contact lens clinic, pediatric clinic, the optical service, and ocular disease clinic.  A nursing home component to the clinical experience will be provided.  Community based screening may also be assigned as part of OPT 304.  Participation with doctors of optometry or other physicians in comprehensive direct patient care within the various services areas.  Case conferences and grand round experiences will be assigned.  Case presentations, evidence-based research on cases, and ongoing enhancement/proficiency of examination skills and assignments as assigned by faculty are expected by all students.

 

 

OPT 317         Strabismus and Amblyopia Diagnosis and Management (2.5 Credits)
Prerequisites – OPT 213. OPT 227

Two and one-half hours of lecture per week.Diagnosis and management of strabismus and amblyopia. Etiology, classifications, risk factors, and intervention strategies will be emphasized.  Prognoses and expected outcomes will be presented as they relate to clinical care.  Practice management strategies for integrating the management of strabismus and ambloypia into the contemporary practice of optometry.

 

 

OPT 318         Optometric Practice Development (2 Credits)
Prerequisites - None

Two hours of lecture per week.  Strategies in the development of an effective and profitable contemporary practice of optometry while providing the highest level of care to patients.  Emphasis will be placed on private practice planning and research leading to new practice locations or opening a new practice.  Developing business plans.  Preparing a loan proposal.  Marketing and research for potential practice locations. Marking plans.  Contract negotiations.  Budget development and management.  Financial control systems.  Understanding and using financial statements in developing a practice and managing the financial aspect of a practice.  Employment planning and human resource utilization. Job interviewing and labor laws.  Compensation and benefit packages.  Preparing job descriptions.  Employee contracts and employment arrangements.  Practice modalities and types of practice arrangements.  Earnings potential with various practice modalities.

 

 

OPT 319         Legal and Ethical Aspects of Optometry (2 Credits)  
Prerequisites - None.

Two hours of lecture per week.  Legal requirements in the practice of optometry.  Record keeping, documentation, informed consent, malpractice, evaluation of visual disability, and licensure.  Criminal and civil systems of justice.  Torts. Professional and general liability.  Case law relating to the practice of optometry.  Ethical theory and its use in decision making.  Application of ethical theory in the practice of optometry, biomedical research, and the use of technology.  The role of the legislative process in the establishment and continued privilege to practice optometry.

 

 

OPT 321         Peri-operative Management and Techniques (2.5 Credits)
Prerequisites – OPT 223, OPT 226, OPT 228, OPT 303, OPT 306

Two hours of lecture and one hour of laboratory per week.  Pre and post operative considerations for ocular and adnexa ophthalmic and laser surgeries.  Indications and candidacy for surgery.  Expected outcomes and prognoses.  Pre-operative counseling, workup, and documentation.  Standard protocols for pre, intra, and post operative care.  Cataract surgery, YAG capsulotomy, refractive surgery, laser trabeculoplasty, peripheral iridotomy, trabeculectomy, retinal detachment surgery, retinal laser surgery, penetrating keratoplasty, and endothelial cell transplantation.  Proper coding and billing for co-management and peri-operative care.

 

 

OPT 323         Advanced Topics Seminars (2 Credits)
Prerequisites - None

Two hours of lecture per week.  Selected topics in the contemporary clinical practice of optometry to include updated and new advances in practice methods, testing, technology, surgeries, ophthalmic lenses, contact lenses, vision therapy, legislative initiatives, coding and billing, or other topics.

 

 

OPT 324         Clinical Internship V (6 Credits)
Prerequisites – OPT 314

Twelve hours of clinic per week.  Clinic patient care will be within the primary care/contact lens clinic, pediatric clinic, the optical service, and ocular disease clinic.  A nursing home component to the clinical experience will be provided.  Community based screening may also be assigned as part of OPT 304.  Participation with doctors of optometry or other physicians in comprehensive direct patient care within the various services areas.  Case conferences and grand round experiences will be assigned.  Case presentations, evidence-based research on cases, and ongoing enhancement/proficiency of examination skills and assignments as assigned by faculty are expected by all students.

 

 

OPT 325         Public Health, Epidemiology, and Geriatrics (2 Credits)
Prerequisites – None

Two hours of lecture per week.  Concepts of public health and epidemiology as they relate to the practice of optometry.  Licensing and regulation procedures for health care professions.  National and state boards and their role in regulating and controlling the practice of optometry.  Concept of standard of care, community standards, and peer review.  The use of epidemiology in public health issues and in the practice of optometry.  Types of epidemiological studies.  Concepts of disease screening.  Emphasis on the major epidemiological eye studies.  Morbidity, mortality, and the distribution of eye disease and vision problems.  Health care delivery and administration in the context of public policy issues.  Geriatric issues in the practice of optometry.  Theories of aging.  Normal ocular aging processes.  Cognitive impairments and dementia.  Pharmacokinetics and other pharmacological issues as they relate to the elderly.  Adjustments to the examination
techniques for the geriatric population.  Diagnosis and management issues related to systemic and ocular conditions common to the elderly population.  Issues related to access of care for the elderly.  Psycho-social, psychological, and economic factors association with aging.  Driving issues.  Elder abuse issues.  Social services available for the elderly.  Advanced directives and legal issues facing the elderly.

 

 

OPT 326         Clinical Medicine and Systemic Disease (2 Credits)
Prerequisites – OPT 301

Two hours of lecture per week.  An overview of systemic diseases, their presentations, diagnostic consideration, and management strategies.  Identification of critical signs and symptoms of systemic disease that warrant urgent or emergent referrals.  Integration of systemic disease knowledge in the treatment and management of ocular disease.  Ocular presentation of systemic disease.  Systemic diseases with ocular co-morbidities. Interdisciplinary management and professional communication and information transfer.  The effects of treatment of systemic disease on eye health and vision to include high risk oral medications and their potential ocular side-effects.  Emphasis on diabetes, hypertension, autoimmune disease, microbial infections and other diseases germane to optometric practice.

 

 

OPT 328         Optometric Business and Administration (2 Credits) 
Prerequisites – OPT 318

Two hours of lecture per week.  A continuation of OPT 318 with an emphasis on the business aspect and day-to-day operations of the business of optometric practice.  Information management to include technology needs and their implementation.  Database management and electronic medical records.  Networks systems and security.  Patient privacy.  Review of legal aspects of patient care.  Evaluation of managed care plans and insurance panels in light of practice business models.  Understanding coding, billing, and insurance submission as it relates to HIPPA, patient rights, legal issues, and good business practices.  Understanding the Explanation of Benefits (EOB) review process.  Insurance audits.  Public relations and internal/external marketing strategies.  Development of community outreach. Staffing and scheduling.  Employee evaluations.  Conflict resolution.  Compliance with federal and state laws regarding employees to include the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).  Financial management of a practice to include payroll, disability insurance, health insurance, tax laws, mandatory filings with taxing authorities.  Risk management and understanding legal and regulatory requirements.  Optometry laws, confidentiality, records release, credentialing and certification/recertification.  Patient grievance procedures.  Quality assurance programs.  HIPPA, OSHA.  Medical malpractice.  Coding and compliance programs.

 

 

OPT 329         Research Methodology (1 Credits)
Prerequisites – None

One hour of lecture per week.  Concepts in research study design. Writing a research proposal.  Issues related to human subject research and the use of IRB process.  Corporate collaboration and research design and implementation.  Proper use of statistical analysis.  Methods of research result dissemination to the greater body of scientists and clinicians.  Scientific research writing for publication adequate for publication in a referred professional journal.

 

 

OPT Elec         Spanish for Optometrists I & II (0 Credits)
Prerequisites – None

Spanish for Optometrists is a voluntary class broken up into two parts. These classes are typically offered during the Summer & Fall terms. The classes focus on typical optometric doctor/patient communications & clinical case scenarios. Part I introduces Optometry students to the fundamentals of Spanish, with emphasis on developing listening comprehension and speaking skills in the optometry setting.  It includes activities for developing abilities in speaking, listening, reading, and writing.


Part II introduces Optometry students to the fundamentals of Spanish, with emphasis on developing listening comprehension and speaking skills in the optometry setting, with emphasis on specialized vocabulary required for counseling patients concerning their illnesses and medications.  It includes activities for developing abilities in speaking, listening, reading, and writing. 

 


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Contact Information

The Rosenberg School
Of Optometry

9725 Datapoint Dr

San Antonio, Texas 78229

210-883-1190

optometry@uiwtx.edu


UIWRSO Clinic Network

210-283-6800 (for appointments)

uiw.edu/optometry/clinic