Meteorology

Course Descriptions

Course descriptions are listed below for the Bachelor of Science Degree in Meteorology and the Bachelor of Science Degree in Broadcast Meteorology. Core courses and other requirements for the Bachelor’s degree in Meteorology are listed in the current UIW Undergraduate Bulletin. The Meteorology Department offers the appropriate course work that could lead to certification by the National Weather Association (NWA) or the American Meteorological Society (AMS), respectively. Students must separately meet the requirements of the NWA or AMS to earn a Seal of Approval for weathercasters. The Meteorology program at UIW does not provide a Seal of Approval but provides sufficient training and course work to prepare students to fulfill the academic requirements for the NWA or AMS Seal of Approval. Please go to the UIW homepage for other information on degree programs in the Sciences, course enrollment, financial aid, and advising.

GEOL 1311 World Geography

World Geography is the study of the physical, cultural, political, and economic characteristics of the world’s geographic regions, there spatial relationships, and how these geographic regions interact with each other. Current and historical case studies are examined to study these relationships.

GEOL 1321 Physical Geography

Physical Geography is a study of the spatial aspects of the physical elements and processes that make up the environment that includes air, water, weather and climate, landforms, soils, animals, and plants of the Earth. Students will examine and analyze the components of the physical environment and how they are interconnected with each other.

GEOL 1415 Astronomy

This course is an integrated lecture and laboratory survey of astronomy that includes the history of astronomy, telescopes, celestial mechanics, time and the seasons, the Earth's Moon, the Sun and the planets, the nature and origin of stars, stellar evolution, the origin and nature of the Milky Way galaxy, types of and nature of nebula, the nature of star clusters, the nature and origin of galaxies, and cosmology. Fee. (Spring)

GEOL 1420 Oceanography

This course presents geological, physical, chemical, and biological studies of the Earth's oceans. Course includes a study of the origin and continuing evolution of the ocean basins, air-sea and land-sea interactions, and life in the oceans. Fee. (Fall)

METR 1325 Natural Hazards
Natural hazards is a survey of the natural events that affect the Earth including, severe thunderstorms, extreme hail events, lightning, hurricanes, tornadoes, floods, tsunami, earthquakes, and volcanic events.

METR 1360 Climatology

Climatology is an introduction to the Earth's the basic physical concepts of weather and climate, the relationship between atmospheric processes and a variety of other aspects of our physical environment, Earth's history, agriculture, our economy, and society.

METR 1430 Meteorology

This course is a study of the composition, structure, and physical properties of the Earth's atmosphere. Course includes a study of the interaction of the Earth's atmosphere with the land, oceans, and life on Earth. Majors in Meteorology and Broadcast Meteorology must pass the course with at least a grade of C before taking upper-division Meteorology courses.  Fee. (Spring)

METR 3310 Radar Meteorology

The course explores the physics of the primary ground-based remote sensors used for operational monitoring of the atmosphere. The capabilities and limitations of the various systems will be studied to determine their impact on applications. The use and applications of remote sensors will include meteorological radar and wind profilers. Prerequisites: GEOL 1321, METR 1430.

METR 3315 Synoptic Meteorology I

Synoptic meteorology is an introduction to atmospheric structure, elementary thermodynamics, synoptic meteorology, and use of computers in meteorology. The course includes theory and practice of weather analysis and forecasting, surface and upper air analysis, fronts and wave cyclones, satellite meteorology, sounding analysis, thermodynamic diagram, cross sections, forecasting, NMC models, MOS, radar meteorology, severe weather. Prerequisites: METR 1360, METR 3310.

METR 3320 Forecasting I

A survey forecast guidance products and the application of physical principles to weather forecasting and the interpretation and use of computer-generated forecast guidance products of the National Weather Service. Prerequisites: METR 3315, METR 3335

METR 3325 Thermodynamic Meteorology

This course is a study of atmospheric processes that influence and play a part in the development and behavior of large-scale weather systems. Prerequisites: METR 3360, METR 3320.

METR 3330 Forecasting II

The course involves an application of physical principles to weather forecasting and the use and interpretation of computer-generated forecast guidance products of the National Weather Service. The course includes an introduction to the structure and dynamics of convective and mesoscale phenomena, including mesoscale convective systems, severe thunderstorms, tornadoes, low-level jets, mountain waves and hurricanes. Prerequisites: METR 3360, METR 3320.

METR 3335 Severe Weather

Severe weather involves a detailed descriptive account of the physical processes important in the formation of various severe and unusual weather phenomena including: thunderstorms, tornadoes, hail storms, lightning, hurricanes, mid-latitude snowstorms, lake effect snows, atmospheric optical effects, and global climate change. Prerequisites: METR 1430, METR 1360.

METR 3340 Hydrology

The course is an overview of hydrological processes with emphasis on the hydrological cycle, surface hydrology, groundwater hydrology, measurement techniques and interpretation of stream flow, precipitation, soil moisture, and rainfall runoff. Prerequisites: METR 1360, METR 1430.

METR 3345 Statistical Climatology

The course is a survey of the types of statistical weather data available for analysis and interpretation of climate and climate change. Statistical analysis includes examination of observational data and manipulation of the data on various temporal and spatial scales. Prerequisites: METR 1360, METR 3310.

METR 3350 Synoptic Meteorology II

The course is a study of the theory and practice of weather analysis and forecasting, surface and upper air analysis, fronts and wave cyclones, satellite meteorology, sounding analysis, thermodynamic diagram, cross sections, forecasting, NMC models, MOS, radar meteorology, severe weather. Prerequisites: METR 3360, METR 3320

METR 3355 Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in Meteorology

This course deals with the design and implementation and use of GIS in decision-making and problem solving in meteorology. This course will further the students’ understanding of how GIS can be implemented and utilized in weather related operations areas. Prerequisite: METR 3310.

METR 3360 Satellite Meteorology

The course focuses on applications of remote sensing of the atmosphere using satellite observations, including cloud detection and the retrieval of atmospheric temperature, and atmospheric moisture and ozone content. The course also teaches the interpretation of imagery collected from weather satellites. Prerequisites: METR 1360, METR 3310.

METR 3365 Physical Meteorology

This course is a study of optical, electrical, acoustic, and thermodynamic properties of the atmosphere including physical processes that transport momentum, energy, and water vertically in the atmosphere. These physical processes include turbulence and convection, cloud formation and precipitation, and radiative transfer. Prerequisite: METR 3325.

METR 3375 Atmospheric Dynamics I

This course involves observational and theoretical analysis of all motion systems of meteorological significance, including governing equations that describe moist atmospheric motions, examination of theoretical models, boundary layer dynamics, atmospheric waves, and quasi-geostrophic theory for midlatitudes. Fundamental principles of physics are applied to explain the dynamical processes that operate in the Earth’s atmosphere. Prerequisite: METR 3325.

METR 3380 Atmospheric Dynamics II

This course involves observational and theoretical analysis of the concepts of circulation and vorticity and examines the principal features of the atmospheric planetary boundary layer dynamics. Fundamental principles of physics are applied to explain the dynamical processes that operate in the Earth’s atmosphere. Prerequisite: METR 3375.

METR 4310 Weathercasting I

The course is a survey of weather graphic systems used in the broadcast industry and their use in developing weathercasts for television. Prerequisites: METR 3330, METR 3350.

METR 4315 Air Pollution Meteorology

The course explores the physics and chemistry of air pollution in the Earth’s atmosphere. Topics covered throughout the course include types of air pollutants, local and global distribution of pollutants, production and transport mechanisms of pollutants, and pollution sinks. The effects of air pollution will also be examined including the monitoring, surveillance, and management of air quality. Prerequisites: GEOL 1321, METR 1430.

METR 4320 Weathercasting II

The course includes the use and application of weather graphic systems to develop on-air weather broadcasts, with an emphasis on severe weather coverage. Prerequisite: METR 4310.

METR 4325 Climate Modeling

The course involves the study and applications of computer models to predict short-term and long-term climate changes on the Earth. Topics covered include the use and application of models to predict short-term (10 to 50 years) changes in temperature and precipitation at local and regional levels, longer-term (50 to 100 years) changes in concentrations of selected atmospheric gases such as carbon dioxide, and long-term changes (greater than 100 years) in global climate including changes in concentrations in greenhouse gases, global warming, sea level, and sea surface temperature. Prerequisites: GEOL 1321, METR 1430.

METR 4330 Workshop in Meteorology

This course is designed to provide the student with a series of meteorological short-courses in a professional conference format with opportunities for students to present case studies of selected weather events/phenomena and to hear presentations from, among others, the National Weather Service, NOAA, NASA, EPA and UIW faculty. Prerequisites: Completion of all Broadcast Meteorology courses.

METR 4371 Special Topics in Meteorology

This course includes an in-depth study of one or more of the following topics in forecasting, weathercasting, applications of GIS in meteorology, severe weather, and climate studies. Prerequisite: 18 hours of upper-level Meteorology courses.


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