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MASTER OF BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES

Curriculum Overview

Home  >  Master of Biomedical Sciences  >  MASTER OF BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES  >  Curriculum Overview

The UIW Master of Biomedical Sciences (MBS) Program provides an innovative and unique approach into the world of healthcare. Recognizing that students will enter the program with a diverse set of interests and professional goals, the curriculum weaves together three main threads:    

  • Science in Medicine
  • Health and Society
  • Professional Development
Curriculum Overview
Fall
Spring

Human Anatomy (4 Credit Hours)
Advanced Cell Biology and Biochemistry (3 Credit Hours)
Health Humanities (2 Credit Hours)
Research Methods & Design I (2 Credit Hours)
Epidemiology (3 Credit Hours)
Professional Development Seminar I  (1 Credit Hours)

15 hours

Human Anatomy II (4 Credit Hours)
Medical Physiology (3 Credit Hours)
Introduction to BioEthics (3 Credit Hours)
Microbial Pathogenesis (3 Credit Hours)
Research Methods & Design II (2 Credit Hours)
Professional Development Seminar II (1 Credit Hours)

15 hours

Summer Electives

Genetics (3 Credit Hours)
Capstone (3 Credit Hours)

6 hours

Medical Spanish (1 Credit Hours)
Success Skills (3 Credit Hours)

 

*Students will be advised or required to take the MCAT/GRE prep-course based on previous exam results.   

  

  • Human Anatomy I

    Human Anatomy I is the study of the structural organization of the human body.  This course provides a framework to assist learners in organizing their study of human anatomy with an emphasis on clinical relevance of basic anatomical knowledge. The mode of instruction for this course will incorporate active learning strategies, discussion-oriented lectures, and cadaver prosection and dissection with a focus on major body regions.

  • Advanced Cell Biology and Biochemistry

    This course focuses on the molecular and cellular mechanisms of biochemistry, providing information about how cellular structures provide function and why disease states occur if these functions are abrogated. This course adopts an integrated approach that emphasizes the structure and function of cells, the relationships among the major classes of macromolecules in cellular systems, metabolic control mechanisms, and the biochemical basis of numerous human diseases. The mode of instruction for this course will incorporate active learning strategies and discussion-oriented lectures to enhance clinical correlation to basic science mechanisms.

  • Health Humanities

    A foundation in Health Humanities helps learners draw from the humanities disciplines to engage in critical thinking about issues in health care, the nature of the interaction between caregiver and patient, and those elements of virtue and character to be developed in the realization of professionalism.  Classes will feature Socratic discussion and regular small-group activities.

  • Research Methods and Design I 

    Students will evaluate and synthesize research findings from current literature by critiquing research design to include research problem, hypothesis, study type, independent and dependent variables and data collection methods.

  • Epidemiology

    Epidemiology is a discipline that identifies the determinants of defects, disease and injury in human populations and provides a means of assessing the magnitude of public health problems and the success of interventions designed to control them. Epidemiology is universally regarded as a discipline that is essential for understanding and solving public health problems, regardless one's area of concentration or specialization.

  • Professional  Development Seminar I

    This seminar is an interactive and dynamic course designed to foster professional development, communication and leadership training through classroom discussions, interactive group exercises and team building activities.  Learners are introduced to theory related to leadership and professionalism.

  • Human Anatomy II

    This course provides a framework to assist learners to continue organizing their study of anatomy with an emphasis on clinical relevance of basic anatomical knowledge.  The mode of instruction for this course will incorporate active learning strategies and discussion-oriented lectures to enhance clinical correlation to basic science mechanisms with a focus on the head and neck including the brain and spinal cord.

  • Medical Physiology

    This course is designed to enhance student knowledge and understanding of the body’s physiologic mechanisms and the underlying regulation. The focus of this course will be on the integrated function of organ systems in regulating the overall homeostasis of the human body, as well as the pathophysiological response of organ systems to injury and disease. The course is divided into several modules, including body fluids and compartments, membranes and transport, acid-base balance, neuromuscular, cardiovascular, pulmonary, renal, gastrointestinal, and endocrine systems.  The mode of instruction for this course will incorporate active learning strategies and discussion-oriented lectures to guide the application of physiologic principles and understanding of pathophysiology to enhance clinical correlations to basic science mechanisms. 

  • Introduction to Bioethics
    Drawing on the Health Humanities’ methods of inquiry (addressed in the previous course Health Humanities) and the multidisciplinary base of Bioethics, this course further explores clinical ethics, the ethics of scientific research, and ethical decision-making as it relates to the learner’s professional identity formation. Learners will be expected to complete regular reading and writing assignments; classroom activities will include Socratic engagements and small-group activities.
  • Microbial Pathogenesis

    This course is designed to focus on mechanisms of microbial pathogenesis that are critical to understanding infectious disease processes.  Students will study the transmission, pathogenesis, clinical presentation, treatment, and prevention of microbial infections.  Relevant clinical examples are used to cover the biological properties of bacterial, viral, fungal, and parasitic pathogens and the diseases they cause.  Basic concepts in innate and adaptive immunity will be introduced to foster the student’s understanding of mechanisms of pathogenicity and disease.  Fundamental principles of pathogenic mechanisms will be linked to the diagnosis and treatment of infections.  The mode of instruction for this course will incorporate active learning strategies and discussion-oriented lectures to enhance clinical correlation to basic science mechanisms.

  • Research Methods and Design II
    Students will design the overall strategy, methodology, and analyses to accomplish the specific aims of their grant proposal that were developed in Research Methods and Design I. Building upon their foundations of critical analysis, students will provide rationale for feasibility, anticipated outcomes, alternative strategies, and potential risks or limitations of their research approach.
  • Professional Development Seminar II
    This seminar is an interactive and dynamic course designed to foster professional development, communication and leadership training through classroom discussions, interactive group exercises and team building activities.  Learners continue their exposure to theory related to leadership and professionalism.
  • Genetics
    This course is designed to provide an overview of human genetic concepts and clinical disorders that have a genetic component. It surveys many areas including cytogenetics, as well as molecular, biochemical, population, and clinical genetics. The mode of instruction for this course will incorporate active learning strategies and discussion-oriented lectures to enhance clinical correlation to basic science mechanisms.
  • Capstone
    Students will assemble and critically evaluate their grant proposal that was developed throughout the Research Methods and Design I and II courses. Following peer review, students will construct and present their research proposal to peers and faculty mentors.
  • Medical Spanish
    This elective course is designed to help students develop Spanish language skills needed to effectively communicate with Spanish speaking individuals. The basic concepts of the Spanish language including vocabulary and correct pronunciation will be discussed and presented with a focus on the health care environment. Students will also learn to evaluate and understand the importance of linguistic and cultural appropriateness to minimize communication barriers in the medical setting. As conversational engagement skills and a deeper understanding of the Spanish language are acquired, students will be able to discuss patient concerns and conduct health assessments. The course will include online self-paced study, videos, readings, and small and large group discussions.
  • Success Skills
    This elective course is designed to help prepare students for the pre-professional or graduate level-entry test including the MCAT and GRE. The material will be offered through Princeton Review and will provide students with a team of subject-matter experts who will provide the comprehensive instruction for each section of the exam. The course will discuss test-taking strategies including Critical Analysis and Reasoning and Psychology and Sociology Coaching. Students will have access to online materials and full-length practice tests. The course requires some in-class instruction and self-directed learning.