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Celebrating Incarnate Word History During SA300

Posted: February 16, 2018
Filed Under: Faculty Profile

“Mi Casa es Su Casa: Come Celebrate With Us!” 

 

On Sunday, April 15, over 700 guests enjoyed a free, family-friendly festival on the campus of the Sisters of Charity of the Incarnate Word, the University of the Incarnate Word and Headwaters at Incarnate Word, the only nature sanctuary in the heart of  San Antonio. 

The day began with liturgy in the Chapel of the Incarnate Word which was followed by a tour of the Chapel lead by Sr. Mary Henry CCVI.  Guests were also treated to a tour of the  CCVI Heritage Center which is a sacred place that holds the story of the Congregation, told through the stories of the individuals who have participated in the mission of Jesus, through the ministries of the Congregation. The exhibit, The exhibit is designed to express the core values that have inspired many hundreds of Sisters of Charity of the Incarnate Word for nearly 150 years to live lives of dedicated service.

Chapel of the Incarnate Word

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The “Mi Casa Es Su Casa," festival featured various performances, art, nature, and culture along with glimpses of the rich history of the Sisters who have served the City of San Antonio since 1869 and continue to invite all to service today.

The Tricentennial High Education Series began chronologically with indigenous peoples who have come to the area around the Headwaters of the Yanaguana, the San Antonio River, for over 11,000 years. The American Indians in Texas at the Old Spanish Missions lead a ceremony at the Blue Hole which was then followed by a lecture titled  “Early Peoples, Spaniards, and Early Education." The presentation began with a welcome by UIW President Dr. Thomas Evans, who was followed by Steve Tomka, Kristi Nichols, Gerald Poyo, Jesse Borrego, Ramon Vasquez and Gilberto Hinojosa. 

Guests enjoyed “Hecho en San Antonio”, the music of the UIW Wind Ensembles special concert with works of San Antonio composers and they also enjoyed music at the outdoor stage. Young performers also shared their gift of dance throughout the day and all enjoyed food and drink from local food truck vendors. The CHRISTUS Children’s Hospital Mobile Unit and the mobile Mammography Unit were available to provide screenings to all who were interested. 

Whether drama and dance are shared by youth of St. Anthony Catholic High School and Incarnate Word High School, or dance is shared by the UIW Asian Indian dancers, or Turkish Dancers from Harmony Academy, performing arts are a part of Incarnate Word. https://www.ccviheritage.org/the-exhibit/music-and-art/ 

 Danza Guadalupana

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
The Danza Guadalupana Group (Photo: Mario Macias)

The Incarnate Word Congregation has always developed on both sides of the border.  This festival featured ten Matachines groups https://therivardreport.com/praising-god-with-drums-dancing-and-the-woman-clothed-with-the-sun/  dancing their prayer at the Grotto and a chance to see some of the works of the acclaimed Mexican art teacher and artist Sister Maria Del Socorro. “The Art of the Sacred Springs Exhibit” continues in the Kelso Art Center, next to the fine Spanish Colonial and Greek and Russian icon exhibit of the Kelso family. 

CCVI Flower Crowned Nun

In Mexico, there is a long tradition of beautiful portraits of nuns crowned with flowers. This comes from the idea of becoming “brides of Christ” when they take their vows.  The Kelso Gallery has two fine examples of these portraits.  

People were able to tour the historic George Brackenridge Villa and maybe even meet “Eleanor Brackenridge,” the mother of women’s suffrage in Texas, outside. 

As conversations and conflicts about immigrants go on today, the festival features “Immigrant Stories” a readers theatre play by Sister Germaine Corbin performed by the Extended Run Plays. The festival remember the immigrants who came to be Sisters---Irish, French, German, Mexican, Czechoslovakian, and Polish through exhibits and foods. 

For more information about programs planned by the Sisters of Charity of the Incarnate during 2018, visit www.sa300ccvi.org/festival

Below are important links to future Incarnate Word events, information on how to volunteer and ways to learn more about the Sisters of Charity of the Incarnate Word:

  • A historical tour remembering the Incarnate Word Sisters history and the history of San Antonio is scheduled for October 6, 2018. The tour, scheduled for 9:30 a.m., will begin and end at the Chapel of the Incarnate Word (4503 Broadway, San Antonio, TX 78209.) The tour is free for those with their own transportation. Participants may purchase or bring their lunch. Please register by writing eccl@uiwtx.edu. For more information on the tour, visit CCVI Historical Tour.
  • “Photo Septiembre” Exhibits: Simultaneous displays on Incarnate Word history created by historian Dr. Gilberto Hinojosa for the month of September. The one in the UIW Semmes Art Gallery will focus on education and the one at the Children’s Hospital of San Antonio will focus on health care in the development of the city.

  • To find out more about the history of the Sisters of Charity of the Incarnate Word, visit the Heritage Center exhibit next to Chapel of the Incarnate Word. The exhibit is 2,300 square feet, presented through the stories of the hundreds of Incarnate Word Sisters and the lay collaborators who have served side-by-side in our ministries of healthcare, education, and social and pastoral services. For more information, call (210) 828-2224 or visit CCVI Heritage.
  • A Historical Timeline of the Congregation can be viewed at CCVI Timeline.

For more information about how to volunteer for other events happening this year, please visit www.uiw.edu/300

Read about the city observance remembering that we are all a part of the year long celebration and community service initiative  https://www.sanantonio300.org/

 

 

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