2010 - 2012 Graduate Bulletin

XI. Course Descriptions

H-E-B SCHOOL OF BUSINESS & ADMINISTRATION

Accounting (ACCT)

ACCT 6311 Managerial Accounting
Using accounting information in organizations for: planning, leading, controlling, and decision-making. Includes impact on the entire organization and its members. Emphasis on volume-cost-profit analysis, budgeting, and decision-making. Alternative financial accounting procedures and their impact on financial statements are examined. Prerequisite: Principles of Accounting I (ACCT 2311) and II (ACCT 2312), or comparable courses. (Fall, Spring)

ACCT 6318 Ethics for Accounting & Business
This course examines the need for an ethical system in today’s society, including an examination of social problems and the role of business in their solution. Special emphasis is placed on the Rules of Professional Conduct of the accounting profession, ethical reasoning, integrity, objectivity, independence and other core values. Meets TSBPA examination requirement (Spring)

ACCT 6330 International Accounting
Accounting issues that are frequently encountered in the international environment are examined. These include differences between national accounting standards, accounting for foreign currency transactions, the translation of foreign currency financial statements, and accounting for changing prices, auditing, management accounting with a focus on cultural aspects, and taxation. International Accounting Standards are used as a principal example of non-US practice. Economic, business environment, cultural, historical accounting and auditing practices, and taxation policies are examined briefly, as they affect the development of national accounting standards around the world. Prerequisites: Principles of Accounting I (ACCT 2311) and II (ACCT 2312) or equivalent courses. Cross-referenced with BINT 6330. (Fall)

ACCT 6335 Law for Accountants
This course is designed to provide accountants with the technical competence required for the Business Law and related Professional Responsibility sections of the CPA examination.

ACCT 6336 Financial Statement Analysis
This course prepares students to analyze, interpret, and evaluate financial statements effectively. It emphasizes developing information to support decision making in the context of private equity investment, corporate mergers and acquisitions, investment banking, asset management, and securities analysis. This course examines the issues of how firms create or destroy value for their shareholders and how financial statements can be used to identify value-creating opportunities. Students must have a substantial understanding of accounting, especially in the areas of disclosure and reporting.

ACCT 6337 Managing and Accounting for Investments
This course focuses on the accounting issues of investments owned by business entities. It builds upon the knowledge gained in traditional corporate finance, investment management and intermediate accounting. It considers the financial accounting and investment management strategies related to investment vehicles such as common and preferred stocks, bonds, derivatives, futures contracts, puts, calls, warrants, options, insurance and venture capital. The course emphasizes practical, theoretical and ethical issues in making, managing, and accounting for investments.

ACCT 6338 Sustainability Performance and Reporting
This course examines business sustainability issues to encourage thoughtful and holistic participation in business by concerned and enlightened citizens through the exercise of critical thinking about important social, environmental and economic issues of the day. This course examines business sustainability issues, strategies being developed and deployed by firms and other organizations, measurement and reporting techniques and issues, and the interpretation of the results of sustainability reporting.

ACCT 6339 Business Communication
This course is a comprehensive study of current practices in business communications. Topics include: Business Writing Principles; Creating and Understanding Technical Communication Related to the Profession; Acquiring the Tools of Technical Communication Techniques for Co-Workers & Clients; Creating Effective Documents & Presentations; Developing and Communicating Evidence-Based Conclusions & Recommendations; Culture and Communication; The Role of Language in Intercultural Communication; and Organizing Messages to Other Cultures.

ACCT 6340 Advanced Financial Reporting
This advanced course examines the traditional major topics of advanced financial reporting including acquisitions and consolidated financial statements with foreign subsidiaries and the consolidated statement of cash flows. Students use accounting research techniques to apply concepts from intermediate and advanced undergraduate accounting courses to real world, problematic situations. Beyond the traditional advanced accounting topics, the course deals with topics such as derivatives and hedges, impairment of intangibles and other long-lived assets, stock based compensation, segment reporting and financial statement disclosures. (Fall)

ACCT 6341 Advanced Managerial Accounting
Using accounting information in organizations for budgeting, planning, directing, controlling, and decision-making. Includes impact on the entire organization and its members. Emphasis of the course is to understand how accounting information is useful for managing organizations. (Spring and Fall)

ACCT 6342 Accounting for Non-profit Organizations
This course focuses on the accounting problems of nonprofit organizations. The course builds upon the knowledge gained in a traditional Governmental and Nonprofit Accounting course, emphasizing the complexities of meeting GAAP standards for nonprofit record keeping and disclosure. The course emphasizes both the practical and ethical issues of the practice of accounting for nonprofit organizations. (Spring)

ACCT 6345 Federal Tax Research
The principles, concepts and methods used to obtain an understanding of federal income taxation of business entities; specifically corporations, partnerships, and tax research. (Fall)

ACCT 6348 Advanced Auditing
This course provides advanced and graduate accounting students an in-depth look at the major topics in auditing from practical as well as theoretical and philosophical perspectives. These topics include such issues as the problems raised by e-commerce, the auditor’s responsibility with regard to fraud, risk assessment and internal control, working with audit committees, non-audit attest and assurance services, auditor independence, client acceptance and retention, and auditor’s liability. (Spring)

ACCT 6350 Problems in Accounting
This advanced course serves as the capstone for the Master of Science in Accounting program. It requires students to use all of the skills and knowledge gained during completion of the program by applying them to contemporary issues and problems facing the profession. Problems are drawn from a variety of sources, including publications of the AICPA Emerging Issues Task Force (EITF,) current published case studies from the AICPA, The American Accounting Association, Harvard Business School, and The North American Case Research Association, from prior CPA and CMA Exams, and from business reporting media such as The Wall Street Journal, Forbes, Business Week, and Barrons. The course emphasizes both the practical and ethical issues of the practice of accounting. (Spring)

ACCT 6388 Accounting Internship
Accounting internships provide an opportunity for students to gain valuable experience by applying the knowledge they have obtained in their course work. Internships generally take place over a 12- to 15-week period and the student must work a minimum of 140 hours at the employing organization in order to obtain three hours of academic credit. This approximates the amount of time that is devoted – inside and outside the classroom – to a typical three-hour class.

Administration (ADMN)

ADMN 6310/7310 Accounting Concepts & Issues
This course is designed to give non-accounting students usable accounting tools they can take to work. Besides study of the processes of accumulating and organizing data for executive decision making, emphasis is placed on the use of basic financial statements, and the use of ratios in their analysis. The focus of attention includes budgeting and the use of accounting information and cash flow information in business plans, the analysis and evaluation of publicly held companies for investment, and concepts such as the time value of money and other decision tools for evaluation of short term decisions and capital investments.

ADMN 6360/7360 Management Concepts and Issues.
Course is designed to develop knowledge and understanding of management functions. Through the use of current periodical literature, classroom presentations, case analysis, lecture and discussion, the course provides examples of management decision-making techniques for dealing with problems that commonly occur in the work setting. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

ADMN 6375/7375 Strategic Planning and Policy
Course provides a comprehensive study of theory and concepts applicable to the strategic management and decision-making process. Case studies and independent research projects provide practice in applying strategic assessment, decision making and implementation processes. Prerequisite: For MAA students this course will be taken as the immediate prerequisite to ORGD 63CS. MBA students require permission of advisor. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

Business Management Decision Sciences(BMDS)

BMDS 6340/7340 Business Research and Analysis
Emphasis is placed on the importance to management of business research and its role in the decision-making process. Analysis and communication of data gained through the research endeavor is stressed. Includes practical exercises in critiquing business research efforts, developing a research proposal, and conducting a research project. Use of a statistical software package is an integral part of the course. Prerequisite: Analytical Decision Making in Business I (BMDS 3370), or a comparable course, completed within the last 5 years. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

BMDS 6370/7370 Project Management I
The first in a sequence of two courses which will utilize qualitative and quantitative techniques in the analysis of project management problems, the design of improved management systems, and the implementation of results in order to achieve desired systems performance. The emphasis of project management is on initiating, planning, executing, controlling and closing of an organizational endeavor. These five categories will be further divided into several project-related topics: Integration Management, Scope Management, Time Management, and Risk Management. (Fall)

BMDS 6371 Project Management II
The second in a sequence of two courses which will utilize qualitative and quantitative techniques in the analysis of project management problems, the design of improved management systems, and the implementation of results in order to achieve desired systems performance. The emphasis of project management is on initiating planning, executing, controlling and closing of an organizational endeavor. These five categories will be further divided into several project-related topics: Integration Management, Scope Management, Time Management, and Risk Management. (Spring)

BMDS 6380/7380 Quantitative Methods in Business
Is an introduction of selected operations research techniques useful in the analysis of managerial problem situations, the design of new and improved systems, and the implementation of results in order to achieve desired system performance. The course emphases problem recognition, problem formulation, selection of proper techniques, problem solutions, and evaluation of results. Course topics are as follows: Linear Programming, Short-term and Long-term Forecasting, Decision Theory, Queuing Theory, Analytical Hierarchy Process, PERT/CPM, Economic Order Quantity, Economic Production Lot Size, and Simulation. Prerequisite: Analytical Decision Making in Business II (BMDS 3371), and Business Research and Analysis (BMDS 6340). (Fall, Spring, Summer)

Economics (ECON)

ECON 6311/7311 Managerial Economics
Application of microeconomic theory to managerial decision-making. Emphasis on the methodology of decision-making. Topics include demand analysis and estimation, cost analysis and estimation, input combination choice, pricing, managerial decision-making in various market structures, and the role of business in society. Prerequisite: Principles of Macroeconomics (ECON 2301), Microeconomics (ECON 2302), Quantitative Techniques (BMGT 3371), or comparable courses. (Fall, Spring)

ECON 6312/7312 International Economics
Analysis of economic issues encountered in the conduct of international business. Topics include international trade theory and policy, foreign exchange markets and the balance of payments, macroeconomic adjustment to trade deficits or surpluses, and current issues. Prerequisites: Principles of Macroeconomics (ECON 2301), and Microeconomics (ECON 2302). Cross-referenced with BINT 6312. (Fall)

ECON 6314 Price & Income Theory
The purpose of this course is to survey the principal models that have been developed by macroeconomists to explain the aggregate behavior of free-market economies and to investigate the implications of those models for policy-making decisions. In particular, it is concerned with how to model the determination of aggregate income, wages rates, exchange rates, inflation rates, interest rates, trade balances and unemployment levels over long and short time horizons. In addition, attention is given to the issue of how key macroeconomic aggregates are measured in practice.

Finance (BFIN)

BFIN 6320/7320 Financial Management
Study of the costs of capital, capital budgeting, working capital policy, financial theory, risk, and other financial topics necessary for understanding and managing the financial aspects of the firm. Prerequisite: Principles of Financial Management (BFIN 3321) or a comparable course. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

BFIN 6321/7321 International Finance
Role of financial institutions in foreign economic relations, including foreign markets, currency risk and management, interest rates, and both banking and non-banking institutions. Stressed are sources of funding, capital instruments, international transactions and commercial development. Prerequisite: Principles of Financial Management (BFIN 3321), International Business Management (BINT 3331), or comparable courses. Cross-referenced with BINT 6321. (Spring)
BFIN 6330/7330 Financial Cases and Problems
Analysis of the financial problems of business, case application to debt/equity choices, mergers, capital budgeting, and governmental regulations. Prerequisite: Financial Management (BFIN 6320). (as needed)

BFIN 6385/7385 Investment Seminar
Practical application of financial and investment techniques using computers, software, and sound financial judgment. Prerequisite: Financial Management (BFIN 6320) (Fall)

Healthcare Administration (HADM)

HADM 6301 Healthcare Organization and Delivery
The purpose of this course is to provide the student an understanding of the U.S. healthcare system through a discussion of the professional, political, social and economic forces that have shaped it. (As required)

HADM 6302 Healthcare Economics
This course orients students to the economic variables that influence market performance, management decision making, and the formulation, implementation, and evaluation of policy within the health services industry. (Fall)

HADM 6303 Population Health and Epidemiology
This course introduces students to the principles of epidemiology as a diagnostic discipline of population health. Emphasis is placed on understanding epidemiological information, the concept of risk, and the tools used to evaluate health problems and policies at a population level. (Fall)

HADM 6305 Healthcare Finance I
This course introduces the purpose and methods of financial accounting including for-profit, and governmental organizations, function and organization of the financial resource department, and special industry characteristics affecting financial management. Contemporary topics on third party payers and insurers, price or rate setting and cost shifting, taxation and healthcare incentives and alternative organizations will be discussed. Additionally, the course will provide students with an understanding of the use of accounting information in healthcare organizations for operational management including the functions of planning, leading, controlling and decision-making. (Spring)

HADM 6306 Healthcare Finance II
This course introduces concepts and develops skills in financial planning and controlling functions including time value of money, pro forma statements, budgets, and ratio analysis. Additional coverage of contemporary financial management topics include capital budgeting, capital structure analysis, cost management, apportioning methods and break even analysis. The course content is designed to give health administration managers the skills and abilities to analyze the financial implications of day to day operational decisions. The financial topics covered in this course provide the necessary foundation for understanding and managing the financial aspects of the modern healthcare organization. (Spring)

HADM 6310 Financing Healthcare Services
This course introduces students to foundational financial management concepts and skills necessary to succeed as managers in the increasingly competitive healthcare environment. (As required)

HADM 6311 Human Resource Management in Healthcare
This course introduces students to the fundamental principles of human resources management with a focus on issues confronting health care administrators. Emphasis is placed on the competencies necessary for effective recruitment, training, compensation, evaluation, retention, evaluation, and development of human resources within the healthcare industry. Special attention is given to issues related to the clinical workforce. (Spring)

HADM 6315 Information Systems Management in Healthcare
This course introduces students to the fundamental principles of collecting and analyzing data for the production of information that supports management operations, planning, and decision-making within healthcare organizations. (Spring)

HADM 6330 Legal and Ethical Issues in Healthcare
This course addresses risk management and legal issues pertaining to health services as they relate to providers and consumers within the health care system. It also provides an examination of managerial and clinical ethics as they relate to the provision of health services. (Fall)

HADM 6340 Quality and Continuous Improvement in Healthcare Organizations
This course introduces students to the fundamentals of quality management and continuous improvement within health services organizations. The purpose of this course is to introduce healthcare managers to the foundational concepts of quality in a healthcare environment in an effort to improve the effectiveness of healthcare delivery. (Fall)

HADM 6350 Quantitative Analysis for Healthcare Managers
This course introduces students to research method techniques and common statistical applications of importance to healthcare managers. Emphasis is placed on the study of statistical techniques for problem-solving and decision-making including the theoretical and applied statistical and quantitative skills required to understand, conduct and evaluate managerial research. (Summer)

HADM 6360 Managing Healthcare Organizations
This course introduces students to management and leadership roles, functions, and practices of health care managers. Emphasis is placed on the skills and competencies necessary for effective health services management. Skills, competencies and roles covered in the course include those related to motivation, leadership, governance, problem solving, power and influence, communication, and coordination. Additionally, students are introduced to the conceptual dimensions for health services organizations/systems at the macro and micro level. The course provides a conceptual framework for identifying, analyzing, evaluating and managing factors that influence the design, structure and effective operation of hospitals and other health care organizations. (Fall)

HADM 6370 Healthcare Marketing Management
This course presents students with the concepts and practices of marketing management within the health care industry. The course develops a comprehensive approach to translating the strategic plan of the health care organization into a functional marketing plan that can be implemented in an effective manner in order to increase the market share of the target public. (Fall)

HADM 6375 Healthcare Strategic Management
This course provides a comprehensive study of theory and concepts applicable to the strategic management and decision-making process in contemporary healthcare organizations. Case studies and independent research projects provide practice in applying strategic assessment, implementation processes, and organizational evaluation and control. The focus is on strategic management process as an institutional staff activity. Emphasis is placed on development of a conceptual model for strategic planning that is applicable to most organizational settings. (Spring)

HADM 6380 Healthcare Policy
This course presents a comprehensive model of health policy and analysis to include its major objectives and methods and its relationship to the field of health services research. An organizing framework is provided that integrates concepts and methods from the fields of epidemiology, economics, ethics, political science and related disciplines. Emphasis is on integrating policymaking with the major system performance objectives of effectiveness, efficiency, and equity. The prerequisites for this course are HADM 6302 and HADM 6303 (or equivalent courses) or permission of the instructor. (Spring)

HADM 6088 Health Administration Internship
The formal internship experience provides the student an opportunity to apply acquired academic knowledge, enhance skills and continue learning through the supervision of an experienced health care professional. The internship is a structured learning environment that allows the student to experience the roles and responsibilities of the health care administrator/manager while gaining an understanding of the organizational dynamics of a real-world health care organization. At the internship location, students will be expected to effectively integrate their efforts within the existing organizational setting. The internship is an optional component of the health administration curriculum, however, no credit is awarded. (Summer, as required)

HADM 6390 Leadership in Healthcare Organizations
This course introduces students to the attitudes, practices and skills necessary for effective health services leadership, with an emphasis on the roles and functions required of entry-level and middle managers. Course topics are discussed and explored within the context of key organizational dimensions to include environment, structure, process, human resources, performance and adaptability. (Fall)

HADM 63CS Health Administration Capstone
This project based course builds upon the knowledge, skills and abilities gained and developed in the core health administration coursework and the student’s employment experiences. The intent of the capstone is to assess student attainment of program competencies in relation to their understanding of healthcare administration. Actual organizational issues are analyzed; discussed and possible strategies are evaluated and defended. Student projects are based on healthcare organizational issues that are consistent with the student’s interests and academic emphasis. Prerequisite: Final semester and completion of HADM 6375, Healthcare Strategic Management. (Spring)

Information Systems (BINF)

BINF 6315/7315 Information Systems Seminar
Provides an overview of contemporary information systems management while exploring the impact technological change has had on evolving business models and strategy. Prerequisite: Information Systems (BINF 2321) or a comparable course. (Fall, Spring).

International Business (BINT)

BINT 6311/7311 International Business
Analysis of business opportunities and political climates, trade barriers, government incentives, currency flows, financial systems, and trade practices. Emphasis on seminar discussion of current issues and readings. Prerequisite: International Business Management (BINT 3331) or a comparable course. (Fall, Spring)

BINT 6312/7312 International Economics
Analysis of economic issues encountered in the conduct of international business. Topics include international trade theory and policy, foreign exchange markets and the balance of payments, macroeconomic adjustment to trade deficits or surpluses, and current issues. Prerequisite: Principles of Macroeconomics (ECON 2301), and Microeconomics (ECON 2302), or comparable courses. Cross-referenced with ECON 6312. (Fall)

BINT 6321/7321 International Finance
Role of financial institutions in foreign economic relations, including foreign markets, currency risk and management, interest rates, and both banking and non-banking institutions. Stressed are sources of funding, capital instruments, international transactions and commercial development. Prerequisite: Principles of Financial Management (BFIN 3321), International Business Management (BINT 3331) or comparable courses. Cross-referenced with BFIN 6321. (Spring)

BINT 6330 International Accounting
Accounting issues that are unique to or most frequently encountered in the international environment are examined. These include differences between national accounting standards, accounting for foreign currency transactions, the translation of foreign currency financial statements, and accounting for changing prices in the area of financial accounting; auditing; management accounting with a focus on cultural aspects; and taxation. Mexico is used as a principal example of non-U.S. practice throughout and its economic history, business environment, culture, accounting and auditing principles, and taxation policies are examined briefly. Prerequisite: Principles of Accounting I (ACCT 2311) and II (ACCT 2312) or their equivalents. Cross-referenced with ACCT 6330. (Fall)

BINT 6334 Sustainability Performance and Reporting (See ACCT 6334.)

BINT 6339 Business Communication (See ACCT 6339)

BINT 6340/7340 International Relations
Concentrated course offered in a host country to expose students to international cultural similarities and differences. May include stay with family, side trips from host location, visits to governmental and trade organizations. Class size limited. Permission of instructor required. (Spring)

BINT 6360 U.S./Mexico Trade Relations
An introduction to the bilateral trade issues and patterns, cultural and historical overview, and business opportunities linking the U.S. and Mexico. Emphasis on seminar discussion. Prerequisite: International Business Management (BINT 6311) (Summer)

BINT 6361/7361 International Marketing
Global marketing environment, research, logistics, cultural assessment, infrastructure, economic indicators, emerging markets, advertising, pricing applied to foreign markets. Developing an international marketing plan, emphasis upon research, group work, and written and verbal presentation skills. Prerequisite: Principles of Marketing (BMKT 3331) or a comparable course. Cross-referenced with BMKT 6361. (Spring)

BINT 6365 International Strategic Management
Analysis of strategic management issues and alternatives as applied to international organizations. Emphasis is upon (1) the use of data for analyzing strategy, and (2) understanding the options for converting strategic options into practical planning processes. Prerequisite: BINT 6311 or equivalent course or permission of instructor.

BINT 6370 Strategic International Advertising
Analysis of opportunities for strategic advertising execution. Emphasis is upon the use of data for analyzing advertising potential as an effective international marketing and sales support. Implementation of an international advertising campaign to reach strategic advertising goals. Discussion of current international situations that create advertising opportunities. Prerequisite: BINT 6311 or equivalent course or permission of instructor.

BINT 6372 International Business Law
This course presents the influence of law and resulting effects on the conduct of international business. It forces the student to understand how differing legal systems might influence trade. It addresses the various treaty agreements and several courts with jurisdiction for resolving disputes. It will incorporate research into recent trade agreements and trade cases. Prerequisite: Business Law (BLAW 3317) or comparable course. Cross-referenced with BLAW 6372. (Fall)

BINT 6375 Strategic Exporting
Analysis of export markets and opportunities for strategic export execution. Emphasis is upon the use of data for analyzing export market potential and upon support services of freight, insurance and financial instruments to reach export goals. Discussion of current international situations that create export potential relative to a home market. Prerequisite: BINT 6311 or equivalent course or permission of instructor.

BINT 6380 Strategic Importing
Analysis of import opportunities for strategic import execution. Emphasis is upon the use of data for analyzing importing market potential and upon support services of freight, insurance and financial instruments to reach strategic importing goals. Discussion of current international situations that create import market potential relative to a home market. Prerequisite: BINT 6311 or equivalent course or permission of instructor.

BINT 6385 Contemporary Issues in Global Trade
Analysis of contemporary issues in global trade for purposes of better planning and executing international trade programs. Emphasis is upon the use of data for analyzing trends and their impact upon international trade and investment. Discussion of issues and decision making in response to global trends that lead to strategic goal setting in international trade and investment. Prerequisite: BINT 6311 or equivalent course

BINT 63CS (Capstone) Seminar in International Business
Analysis, research, discussion, and presentation of alternative solutions to international problems in business. Student must have working command of Internet-based research, traditional print research, computer graphics and text presentation software, and ability to process survey data. Prerequisite: Student must be in final semester of enrollment or by permission of instructor. Cross-referenced with BMGT 63CS. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

Law (BLAW)

BLAW 6350 Employment Law
This course provides a comprehensive study of law as it applies to regulation and conditions of employment in both the private and public sector. (Fall, Spring)

BLAW 6372/7372 International Business Law
This course presents the influence of law and resulting effects on the conduct of international business. It forces the student to understand how differing legal systems might influence trade. It addresses the various treaty agreements and several courts with jurisdiction for resolving disputes. It will incorporate research into recent trade agreements and trade cases. Prerequisite: Business Law (BLAW 3317) or a comparable course. Cross-referenced with BINT 6372. (Fall)

Management (BMGT)

BMGT 6311/7311 Human Resources Management
Comprehensive study of current practices in human resources management. Topics include HR planning, recruitment, selection, performance evaluation, training, development, career management, compensation systems, labor relations, and legal constraints. Prerequisite: Management Theory and Practice (BMGT 3340) or a comparable course. (Fall, Spring, Summer)
BMGT 6334 Sustainability Performance and Reporting (See ACCT 6334)

BMGT 6339 Business Communication (See ACCT 6339)

BMGT 63CS/73CS (Capstone) Cases in Management Problems
Capstone course that combines all functional disciplines in business administration into a problem-solving course. Actual businesses are analyzed, discussed, and strategies defended. Prerequisite: Final semester or permission of instructor. Cross-referenced with BINT 63CS. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

BMGT 66CS (Capstone) Integrated Nursing – Management Problems
Capstone course for the combined MSN and MBA program to be taken in the last semester before graduation. Addresses the roles of nurse as practitioner, manager, and educator by integrating the functional disciplines in nursing, adult education, and business administration into a problem-solving case. Actual cases analyzed, discussed, and feasible solutions presented. Prerequisite: Final semester in MSN and MBA program. (As needed)

Marketing (BMKT)

BMKT 6311/7311 Marketing Management
Overview course stressing management of the marketing function: competition, pricing, distribution, promotion, and planning. Emphasis on strategic marketing issues. Prerequisite: Principles of Marketing (BMKT 3331) or a comparable course. (Fall, Spring)

BMKT 6361 International Marketing
Topics include global marketing environment, research, logistics, cultural assessment, infrastructure, economic indicators, emerging markets, advertising, and pricing applied to foreign markets. Emphasis upon research, group work, written and verbal presentation skills, and development of an international marketing plan. Prerequisite: Principles of Marketing (BMKT 3331) or a comparable course. Cross-referenced with BINT 6361. (Spring)

Organizational Development (ORGD)

ORGD 6320/7320 Organizational Behavior and Learning
Emphasis is placed on the contributions of the behavioral sciences toward improving individual and organizational productivity and well-being. Using a participative framework, students examine personal, group and organizational issues relevant to today’s changing workplace. Continuous learning anchors the applications orientation. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

ORGD 6330/7330 Foundations of Organizational Research and Assessment
Course emphasizes the development of quantitative and qualitative organizational research and analysis techniques. Interviewing, participant observation, artifact analysis and principles of survey design, administration and evaluation represent a few of the techniques covered in this course as they relate to organizational assessment and problem solving. Students will become familiar with the concepts, principles and techniques of research design, data collection, sampling, analysis and reporting. Students will also become familiar with the importance of ethical behavior as it relates to research activities. Students will develop the ability to produce and report descriptive statistics related to organizational survey assessment. (Fall, Spring,).

ORGD 6340/7340 Organizational Consulting
This course presents the fundamentals of organizational consulting, both as an internal and external consultant, including: the consulting process, tactic and strategies, client management, and ethics of consulting Prerequisite: ORGD 6320.

ORGD 6351/7351 Foundations of Organizational Development
Course will provide an overview of the discipline of Organizational Development (O.D.) including definitions; O.D. as normative discipline/an organic process/a planned sequence of activities; organization and change theory; the ethics and values of the O.D. professional. Self-assessment will be an integrative theme and experience during the semester. (Fall, Spring) Prerequisites: ORGD 6320 and ORGD 6330

ORGD 6352/7352 Organizational Development Interventions and Practices
Students will learn the role responsibilities and practices of the change agent/Organizational Development professional. Core interventions such as process consultation, survey feedback research, team building and facilitation will be examined. Other applications related to organizational transformation, the TQM movement, globalization, diversity and training will be explored as well. Student teams will initiate and carry out an Organizational Development project within an organization. Prerequisite: ORGD 6351 (Fall, Spring)

ORGD 6370/7370 Human Performance Technology
This course presents the fundamentals of Human Performance technology (HPT). There are multiple reasons for performance problems. HPT is a systematic process designed to understand the causes for the gap between desired performance and actual performance, and to recommend, implement and evaluate solutions to narrow that gap.

ORGD 63CS MAA Capstone: Integrative Analysis of Organizational Development.
This project based course builds upon the knowledge, skills and abilities gained and developed in the core and concentration coursework and the student’s employment experiences. Actual organizational issues are analyzed, discussed and possible strategies are evaluated and defended. Student projects are based on organizational issues that are consistent with the student’s area of concentration. Prerequisite: Final semester or permission of instructor. (Fall, Spring)


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